“Miracle Mineral Solution” Seller Convicted

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Posted 01 June 2015

Seller of “Miracle Mineral Solution” Convicted for Marketing Toxic Chemical as a Miracle Cure

A federal jury in the Eastern District of Washington returned a guilty verdict yesterday against a Spokane, Washington, man for selling industrial bleach as a miracle cure for numerous diseases and illnesses, including cancer, AIDS, malaria, hepatitis, lyme disease, asthma and the common cold, the Department of Justice announced.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, May 28, 2015

http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/seller-miracle-mineral-solution-convicted-marketing-toxic-chemical-miracle-cure

Seller of “Miracle Mineral Solution” Convicted for Marketing Toxic Chemical as a Miracle Cure

A federal jury in the Eastern District of Washington returned a guilty verdict yesterday against a Spokane, Washington, man for selling industrial bleach as a miracle cure for numerous diseases and illnesses, including cancer, AIDS, malaria, hepatitis, lyme disease, asthma and the common cold, the Department of Justice announced.

Louis Daniel Smith, 45, was convicted following a seven-day trial of conspiracy, smuggling, selling misbranded drugs and defrauding the United States. Evidence at trial showed that Smith operated a business called “Project GreenLife” (PGL) from 2007 to 2011.  PGL sold a product called “Miracle Mineral Supplement,” or MMS, over the Internet.  MMS is a mixture of sodium chlorite and water.  Sodium chlorite is an industrial chemical used as a pesticide and for hydraulic fracking and wastewater treatment.

Sodium chlorite cannot be sold for human consumption and suppliers of the chemical include a warning sheet stating that it can cause potentially fatal side effects if swallowed.

“This verdict demonstrates that the Department of Justice will prosecute those who sell dangerous chemicals as miracle cures to sick people and their desperate loved ones,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Benjamin C. Mizer of the Justice Department’s Civil Division.

“Consumers have the right to expect that the medicines that they purchase are safe and effective.”  Mizer thanked the jury for its service and its careful consideration of the evidence.

The government presented evidence that Smith instructed consumers to combine MMS with citric acid to create chlorine dioxide, add water and drink the resulting mixture to cure numerous illnesses. Chlorine dioxide is a potent agent used to bleach textiles, among other industrial applications.  Chlorine dioxide is a severe respiratory and eye irritant that can cause nausea, diarrhea and dehydration.  According to the instructions for use that Smith provided with his product, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting were all signs that the miracle cure was working.  The instructions also stated that despite a risk of possible brain damage, the product might still be appropriate for pregnant women or infants who were seriously ill.

According to the evidence presented at trial, Smith created phony “water purification” and “wastewater treatment” businesses in order to obtain sodium chlorite and ship his MMS without being detected by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or U.S. Customs and Border Protection.  The government also presented evidence that Smith hid evidence from FDA inspectors and destroyed evidence while law enforcement agents were executing search warrants on his residence and business.

Before trial, three of Smith’s alleged co-conspirators, Chris Olson, Tammy Olson and Karis DeLong, Smith’s wife, pleaded guilty to introducing misbranded drugs into interstate commerce.  Chris Olson, along with alleged co-conspirators Matthew Darjanny and Joseph Lachnit, testified at trial that Smith was the leader of PGL.

In all, the jury convicted Smith of one count of conspiracy to commit multiple crimes, three counts of introducing misbranded drugs into interstate commerce with intent to defraud or mislead and one count of fraudulently smuggling merchandise into the United States.  The jury found Smith not guilty on one out of four of the misbranded drug counts. He faces a statutory maximum of 34 years in prison at his Sept. 9 sentencing.

The case was investigated by agents of the FDA’s Office of Criminal Investigations and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service.  The case was prosecuted by Christopher E. Parisi and Timothy T. Finley of the Civil Division’s *Consumer Protection Branch* <http://www.justice.gov/civil/consumer-protection-branch>in Washington, D.C.

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6 Responses to “Miracle Mineral Solution” Seller Convicted

  1. Gavin 3 June, 2015 at 1:39 pm #

    Quote – “Sodium chlorite is an industrial chemical used as a pesticide and for hydraulic fracking and wastewater treatment.”

    The level of misguided information is mind boggling.

    A simple google search will reveal several approved products in the US alone that are approved formats of pathogen control, especially in dentistry and food(Meat)industries. It is also used in City water treatment, as it is more effective and (get this) less dangerous to use!

    Fact is – the compound is even generated in the body as a natural defense, but decreases with age due to toxification. Why should people not be allowed to use the material?

    How many deaths have been reported in the history of this disinformation campaign? None I posit.

    My question then is – “Who is protecting who in this misguided information war on health (or should I say profit?)?”

    The uninformed will not continue to be manipulated for benefit of the few for too much longer.

    • Harris 3 June, 2015 at 2:45 pm #

      @Gavin
      I frankly believe the Department of Justice over your point of view, not because I blindly follow what their courts decided, but because of the evidence. Your disinformation does you a disservice.

      You are basically arguing because, e.g., dettol is used for pathogen control, that it can be safely ingested. The same with sodium chlorite – safe outside the body, not so safe in the body. Also, you are confusing Sodium chlorite with Sodium hypochlorite used in dentistry (and dangerous if absorbed or getting into tissues.)

      You make the point that “the compound is even generated in the body as a natural defense” – please supply evidence of this, I cannot find any evidence this is true.

      Even Wikipedia does not mention its benefits in the body or for treatment of conditions

      Pubmed, (comprises more than 24 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books) list over 220 articles on sodium chlorite and none show use, or benefit in humans or animals. A few listed show adverse effects following accidental exposure. For example, here is a study of a 65-year-old man presented to hospital after accidentally ingesting a small amount of a sodium chlorite solution.

      But besides the safety of this compound, there is not a SINGLE study confirming a single beneficial claim for sodium chlorite. The claims one reads of, like yours, are based on untested testimonials.

      You write “Who is protecting who in this misguided information war on health (or should I say profit?)?”
      Considering that you benefit from selling this product, that there is no evidence for your claims, that you are giving misguided and incorrect information, I would say this applies to you. I do not sell any competing product and do not earn a cent from pointing out this scam to consumers.

      Note: Gavin is a member of a Genesis II Forum of Health and Healing, Restoring Health, a website that promotes and sells this product, and among other, claim that this ingredient can cure malaria. If this was true, the World Health Organisation would be buying this product in litres. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation would NOT be wasting millions of dollars in research to find an effective treatment if this product, MMS, was effective.

  2. John Greg 7 May, 2018 at 9:46 pm #

    Dear Mr. Harris,
    Nearly 3 years have passed since your above comment. My comment may be too late to be noticed.
    Your final paragraph, postulating that if MMS really cured malaria, “the WHO would be buying the product in litres” and “Bill and Melinda Gates would not be wasting millions of dollars”, etc. reveals a very disturbing disconnect from the real world. I’m sorry, this is not how this world & its businesses operate. You would appear to be amongst the naive who also believe that benevolent Big Brother Pharma would jump at a known cure for any particular disease, if it existed. Yes—IF there was a profit. If there is no profit, Big Pharma will not touch it. You almost have to agree with their reasoning.–They just can’t afford to invest in it. (And if the drug companies don’t make it, the WHO and Bill can’t use it.) Unfortunately, an unprofitable cure is not only unattractive to them, but is a major threat to their bottom-line. If you don’t grasp this foundational principle, there is no need for further debate. I don’t mean to be demeaning, but, “dream on”.
    You reference Wikipedia. I’m sorry, but this also manifests an unfortunate naivety. Wikipedia is as biased & bought as any other world-influential organization. They do well with some “facts & figures”. But go to any issue that is subjective, or where the jury is still out, and try to introduce new information that conflicts with the consensus, and their editors will eat you alive. It is a hierarchy of yes-men. Its rules & structures preserve the status quo and are not accommodating to personal input by the most knowledgeable sources.
    I don’t sell MMS. But I have used it, not only harmlessly, but very successfully for 4 years. It always amazes me that people doubt someone who looks you in the eyes, and with nothing to gain, tells you, “I was sick. Now I’m well”; or are cynical of those who may make a few cents on selling a health product (MMS is extremely cheap); but believe with childish gullibility the pronouncements of corporations who (literally) spend more on advertising than they do on medical research, and then sell their questionable potions at exorbitantly high prices, and have stockholders to please & billions of dollars at stake. And who have been taken to court (and lost cases, often because of drug-induced deaths) hundreds of times. If you simply “follow the money”, sir, I assure you, it will not lead anywhere near MMS.
    The shame & utter scam of our day is not harmless individual product sellers, but the organized & bold-faced criminals who can lose civil suit after felony suit, yet bounce back with enough money to buy off the legal system, to put congressmen & judges in fear, and make sure that ONLY their views & news are represented in the media.
    In your case, it would be best to never touch MMS. Not because it’s dangerous to your health. But rather because the moment that you found out for your own self, with your own mind, and your own senses, and your own personal observations, how harmless, and yet how effective it can be, it would most certainly cast fatal doubt on the sources of every lie & bit of misinformation you & the public are being fed. It might be a mortal blow to the fairy tale worldview of big business, government institutions and all that you have been led to implicitly trust your whole life. A “dangerous” substance indeed. Every person that is helped or healed by MMS (or by other decent & effective natural remedies which are vilified) becomes one more prospect lost to the system’s fold. This is why they muster their top guns & dedicate large portions of their budgets (or the taxpayers’ money, in the case of the FDA) in the name of “public welfare” to quash these tiny alternative options.
    Prove me wrong, sir, not from what you read, but from your own experience. I speak what I know. You appear to speak (and fear) only what you have heard. Thank you for reading.

    • Harris 7 May, 2018 at 11:23 pm #

      @John Greg
      You appear to be a conspiracy theorist.

      Many, many good researchers work in academia and not beholden to Big Pharma. These researchers seek cures for diseases affecting their own country’s population, or for the whole world. These groups are funded by non-profit organisations or governmental agencies. One of these researchers, a family member of mine, was involved in malaria research. I can tell you MMS is bullshit.

  3. Gavin 8 May, 2018 at 7:41 am #

    “I can tell you MMS is bullshit.” – how very informative Mr Harris. And that from a person who can’t tell the difference between Sodium Chlorite and Sodium hypochlorite.

    MMS is not Sodium chlorite, but an exact combination ratio of Sodium chlorite and the activator used.

    I wish you a healthy and carefree day Mr Harris.

    • Harris 8 May, 2018 at 8:44 am #

      @Gavin
      Bullshit: “noun 1. nonsense, lies, or exaggeration. Dictionary.com

      For those that do not know, sodium chlorite (NaClO2) versus sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl).

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