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Sports nutrition position paper backs dietary protein over supplements

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There is no physical reason for athletes to increase protein intake with supplements, says the German Nutrition Society (DGE), who recommend a balanced diet to achieve all protein requirements.

In the last of seven position papers by the society, the paper recommends that protein intake depending on training conditions and goals should be at approx. 1.2-2.0 grams per kilogram (g /kg) body weight.

Regarding supplementation. Dr Helmut Heseker, professor of nutritional science at the university of Paderborn states, “In the everyday nutritional routine of athletes there is no physiological reason to supplement protein intake with supplements and a balanced diet is usually superior to supplements.”

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South African Whey and Casein protein powders lack important amino acids

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Posted 07 November 2019

This South African study found that  the the majority of 100% Whey or Casein protein powders, e.g. made by USN, Nutritech, Evox , do not contain the levels of protein as indicated on the label. But more seriously, these products claim to build muscle – but have been stripped of essential amino acids so they are not “proper proteins” and therefore, cannot do so, but can only be utilised as fuel.

Subject: 12th IFDC 2017 Special Issue – High protein sports supplements: Protein quality and label compliance

ScienceDirect

12th IFDC 2017 Special Issue – High protein sports supplements: Protein quality and label compliance⋆ Hettie C.Schönfeld Nicolette Hall BeulahPretorius Journal of Food Composition and Analysis Volume 83, October 2019, 103293

Highlights

  • International harmonization of food-type supplement regulations is limited.
  • Protein supplements are not distinctly regulated in S. Africa by local food control.
  • Commercial high-protein sport supplement label
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3 Bodybuilding Supplements That Are An Absolute Waste Of Money

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Posted 16 October 2017

“Supplement companies have definitely mastered one thing- how to market & sell stupid supplements. Unfortunately, only a handful of supplements work and are worth your money. Most of them, sadly, only dig a hole in your pocket. Apart from a handful supplements, a ton of them that are being sold today in the name of hypertrophy are completely useless. If you are a beginner, or even an intermediate lifter, chances are that you don’t need a lot of supplements that you may just be using. Here are some of them. “

  1. Arginine
  2. Cla, L-Carnitine, Green Coffee Extract and Fat Burners 
  3. Hydrolysed Whey Protein

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Sports nutrition growth spoiled by ‘wrong and immoral’ marketing

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Posted 28 June 2017

Readers will be aware of the number of ASA rulings against USN and Biogen products making claims of being able to “boost testosterone”. Readers will also be aware of USN laying a charge of defamation against Dr Harris Steinman, who pointed out, among other, the falseness of these claims.

In this article titled “Sports nutrition growth spoiled by ‘wrong and immoral’ marketing” published in NutraIngredients.com, the following points are made:

Speaking to Nutralngredients, Graeme Close, professor of sports nutrition, John Moores University, said: “There are some great companies out there who understand the rules and regulations and abide by them and do give some good information out.” But the said the industry was being undermined by “the smaller brands or the less reputable ones trying to bring something what they think is unique and new to market”.

He pointed to companies marketing “fat burners and

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Protein hype: shoppers flushing money down the toilet, say experts

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Posted 28 December 2016

USN, Evox and other ‘sport-supplement’ sellers, have been making a range of unsubstantiated claims for high protein products, e.g., “100% Whey protein”. These vary from claiming to build muscle, make you bulk up, and “USN’s new 100% Whey Protein Plus provides the highest quality protein per serving for rapid uptake and its conversion into amino acids and muscle mass by your body” and “maximises muscle recovery & development”. CamCheck has constantly pointed out that these claims are unproven and rubbish (USN/Albe Geldenhuys is suing Dr Harris Steinman for R2 million for pointing out the falseness of his/their claims, among other, these).

An article published in The Guardian now also weighs in on this issue.

Some extracts:

“Consumers fuelling demand for high-protein products unlikely to see any benefits as people already eat more protein than they need, say dietitians. Experts have warned … Read the rest

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Muscle-building shakes don’t always have as much protein as they claim to

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Posted 10 July 2016

In a report in The Conversation, researchers elaborate on their research into whether protein supplements available in South Africa contained the level of protein indicated on the label.

The researchers report:

In our study we found a difference of up to 80% in the labelled protein content and the value determined during analysis. From the 70 products included in the study, 65 products – or 93% – fell within the regulations.

In 21 products the actual protein in the product was more than 10% less than that stated on the label, but five products over-reported protein content by more than the acceptable limit of 25%.

These five products had between 42% and 80% less protein in the tub than what they declared on their product labels.

In this study, Nutritech, BPI and Supplements SA fare extremely poorly. USN previously laid a complaint with the Read the rest

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Targeting school children in marketing campaigns for sports supplements: Is it ethical?

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Posted 31 May 2016

On 17 April 2016, the journalist, Elaine Swanepoel drew our attention in the Afrikaans Sunday newspaper, Die Rapport, to USN targeting and marketing to sport supplements to children. Bizarrely, according to the report: “Yet says Albe Geldenhuys, head of USN, to Die Rapport, that primary school children should not under any circumstances be using supplements”. The text of this article, and commentary, is reproduced here.

In the South African Sports Medicine Association (SASMA) May 2016 newsletter, the selling of sports supplements to schoolchildren is addressed.

“SASMA considers such aggressive marketing as highly irresponsible, dangerous and somewhat unethical as the youth who are involved in the schooling system are vulnerable targets”
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Diet supplements threat to liver

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Posted 25 January 2016

From the Medical Journal Australia:

CLINICIANS have been warned to be alert to the possible role of herbal and dietary supplements in cases of hepatotoxicity in the wake of a West Australian man experiencing severe drug-induced liver injury (DILI) after taking a protein and weight loss supplement.

A case report published in the Medical Journal of Australia outlined the experience of a 26-year-old Indigenous man who presented with severe liver injury 10 weeks after taking a whey protein supplement containing green tea extract as well as a dietary supplement containing Garcinia cambogia for just 1 week. The researchers reported that the patient had no previous medical history, did not drink to excess, was not taking medications regularly, and did not smoke or use illicit substances.

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Supplement use might be a sign of disordered eating in men

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Posted 08 October 2015

A recent study suggests that the growing use of dietary supplements in men, driven by the need to attain an ideal body image, might signal a new kind of disordered eating. Researchers found that of 195 men who had admitted to taking legal dietary supplements, such as whey protein, creatine, or L-carnitine, over 40% had increased supplement use over time, and 22% had replaced regular meals with dietary supplements that were not meant to be used that way. Furthermore, 29% of the men actually expressed concern about their increased supplement use, 8% had been advised by their physician to cut back on supplement use, and 3% had been admitted to the hospital for kidney or liver damage associated with dietary supplements.

From Natural Medicines Integrative Medicine Newsletter

Reference:
Achiro R. Excessive Workout Supplement Use: An Emerging Eating Disorder in Men. Aug. 8, … Read the rest

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Do sports drinks and energy bars make you a better athlete?

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Posted 15 September 2015

This video from CBC news, investigates whether sports drinks and energy bars make you a better athlete. Mmmm, not really. And the amount of sugar in the products!

So how much sugar in USN’s Ener-G Sports Energy Hydration Drink? Will you be surprised to know that 500 of drink contains  just over 18 gm of sugar, that is around 4.5  teaspoons of sugar? (4 grams of white sugar (granulated) is equal to 1 teaspoon of sugar)

http://www.usn.co.za/product/core-muscle/muscle-support/energ-sports-106.html

 

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