Archive | Blood tests

UK ASA Ruling on Yorktest Laboratories Ltd / IgG Food Intolerance testing

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Posted 12 July 2021

Three complainants challenged whether the claim “YorkTest define Food Intolerance as a food-specific IgG reaction”, and the overall impression of both ads that the test would inform consumers if they had a food intolerance, was misleading and could be substantiated. Another complainant challenged whether the efficacy claims about migraines in both ads and depression in ad (b) were misleading and could be substantiated.

The UK ASA concluded the evidence was insufficient to support the claims.

Similar companies in South Africa make the same unfair claims, .e.g., ImuPro.

ASA Ruling on YorkTest Laboratories Ltd

  • 23 June 2021 ASA

Background

Summary of Council decision:

Two issues were investigated, both of which were upheld.

Ad description

A TV ad and website for YorkTest:

a. The TV ad, seen on 29 January 2018, featured a woman described in on-screen text as a “Nutritionist YorkTest Laboratories” standing in a kitchen in

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UK ASA Ruling on DNAfit Life Sciences Ltd t/a DNAfit

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Posted 12 July 2021

Similar to the South African company, DNA Analysis, who claims that they are able to create a diet based on your DNA, this UK company made similar claims. The UK ASA found insufficient evidence to support their claims.

ASA Ruling on DNAfit Life Sciences Ltd t/a DNAfit

  • 31 March 2021 ASA

A paid-for ad on Instagram for DNAfit, seen on 29 September 2019, featured an animated double helix and captions that stated “We’re DNA. We know all about your body. Fast twitch muscle fibres give you power. Slow give you endurance. And that’s not all we can tell you. Order your kit now at DNAfit.com”. A caption under the animation stated “Unlock the secret to your ideal diet, vitamin need and exercise response”.

Issue

The complainant, who believed DNA testing could not be used to determine an individual’s diet, vitamin and exercise needs, challenged

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Chiropractor sentenced for allergy ALCAT testing scam

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Posted 04 September 2019

In February 2019, the California Board of Medical Examiners accused Benjamin Darrow, D.C. of unprofessional conduct related to criminal charges that he had defrauded insurance companies. The charges centered around his billing for ALCAT tests for “intolerances” to foods and other environmental substances. ALCAT tests are not recognized as valid by the scientific community and are not covered by most insurance programs.

Reference: Barrett S. Chiropractor prosecuted for false billing for ALCAT testing. Chirobase, Aug 30, 2019

According to the accusation, Darrow managed to get paid by using false billing codes and pretending that the tests were done in his offices. In May 2019, Darrow pleaded “no contest” to the criminal charges and agreed to pay restitution plus investigative and court costs. In August 2019, he was sentenced to serve a year in jail, ordered to pay $877,000 in restitution, and serve six years Read the rest

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‘There is no validity’: Unproven blood tests for food sensitivity widely offered in Canada

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Posted 15 November 2018

The IgG test, for ‘food intolerance, is being sold in South Africa by among other, ImuPro and Yorktest. As mentioned in other posts on CamCheck, the Allergy Society of South Africa, the American Academy of Allergy and the European counterparts, all state that there is no validity to this test. Yet they continue to be sold to the unsuspecting public.

This article describes this problematic test being marketed in Canada.

‘There is no validity’: Unproven blood tests for food sensitivity widely offered in Canada

More than 2 dozen health groups have warned about misuse, misinterpretation of IgG tests for food intolerance

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Quantum Logic: Dark Field Blood Analysis and Quantum Biofeedback food stress test

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Posted 02 August 2018

Quantum Logic’s website promotes a number of health modalities. Two in particular caught our interest: Dark Field Blood Analysis and Quantum Biofeedback food stress test.

Owner, Chris de Beer “recommends a Dark Field Blood Analysis and Quantum Biofeedback food stress test  as the first sensible step towards a 100% personalised diet, long term eating plan – determining which foods cause positive  or negative reactions for you – and an exercise regime. During the Dark Field Blood Analysis you will see a live drop of your blood magnified by a microscope on a computer screen; watch the activities, condition, and number of red as well as white blood cells; see what your cholesterol situation is; and whether there are parasites lurking in your blood –  the carrier of all nutritional and other matter to every nook and cranny of your body”.

Both these tests are unproven, unsubstantiated, Read the rest

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Dubious claims abound on Canadian naturopathy, homeopathy, acupuncture, and homeopathy clinic Web sites

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Posted 06 March 2017

A survey of 392 naturopathy, homeopathy, acupuncture, and homeopathy clinic Web sites has found that unsupportable claims for the management of asthma and allergy are widespread.
[Murdoch B and others. Selling falsehoods? A cross-sectional study of Canadian naturopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, and acupuncture clinic website claims relating to allergy and asthma]

The investigators concluded:

  • The majority of the clinics studied claim they can either diagnose or treat both allergy/sensitivity and asthma.
  • Naturopathic clinic websites have the highest rates of advertising at least one of diagnosis, treatment, or efficacy for allergy or sensitivity (85%) and asthma (64%), followed by acupuncturists (68% and 53%, respectively), homeopaths (60% and 54%) and chiropractors (33% and 38%).
  • The majority of the advertised interventions lack evidence of efficacy, and some are potentially harmful.
  • Food-specific IgG testing was commonly advertised, despite the fact that the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has
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British regulators restrict live blood analysis claims

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Posted 28 October 2015

From Consumer Health Digest #15-42, October 25, 2015:

The Committees of Advertising Practice (CAP), which provide the UK Advertising Codes administered by the Advertising Standards Authority, has issued a guidance statement on live blood analysis. The document states that advertisers of should not:

  • Make claims that live blood analysis can detect current or future health risks
  • Make claims for treatment of conditions or diseases detected with the test
  • Make any reference to the diagnosis or treatment of cancer
  • Use the title “Dr” unless you hold a general medical qualification
  • Discourage essential treatment for conditions for which medical supervision should be sought
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Live blood analysis – real ‘woo-woo’

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Posted 17 November 2014

“An evaluation of the cells of the blood can give hints to the presence or cause of many diseases, from vitamin deficiencies to infection to leukemia. The CBC (complete blood count) with or without a differential (the types of cells seen) is part of any initial evaluation of ill patients. With live blood analysis, practitioners take the seed of truth that the evaluation of the blood constituents can give valuable information and grow a forrest of fantasy and magic. It is something to behold.”

From the article, Live Blood Analysis: The Modern Auguries, by Dr Mark Crislip, posted to ScienceBasedMedicine. Dr Crislip explains exactly why this is a scam and how users take facts and extrapolate these into real bullsh_t.

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Bioresonance nonsense

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Posted 17 November 2014

At the website, Bioresonance Quit Smoking Therapy (www.bioresonance.co.za/), the claim is made that “Bioresonance Quit Smoking Therapy is one of the most advanced bioresonance technologies to help people give up smoking. Usually 3 or 4 sessions with BICOM 2000 is sufficient to make you stop smoking”. Further on the claims are made that “Modern German bioresonance technology has success rate over 90%. The stop smoking therapy helps you quit smoking without the desire for nicotine and without gaining weight”.

The owner appears to be  Jenny Lubasinski, 21 Nightingale Road, Atlasville, Gauteng, 1645

Our skeptic radar was triggered. How is it that such a remarkable success rate has not resulted in this product being more widely available and used?

Luckily for us, Dr Dave Gorski’s ‘insolence’ blog has done us a service by eloquently explaining why this is sheer nonsense, or as he describes Read the rest

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The blood-type diet? Just hype, says new research

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Posted 25 July 2014

The blood-type diet? Just hype, says new research

From: The Mosaic: the science of Life
In 1996 a naturopath named Peter D’Adamo published a book called Eat Right 4 Your Type. D’Adamo argued that we must eat according to our blood type, in order to harmonise with mankind’s evolutionary heritage. D’Adamo’s book has sold 7 million copies and has been translated into 60 languages. What does latest science say about this diet?

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