Archive | Oxygen therapy

TGA initiates court proceedings against Oxymed Australia and director Malcolm Hooper for alleged unlawful advertising

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Posted 08 September 2020

In March 2019, Natasha Bolognesi wrote an article for GroundUp, making the point: “But practitioners of so-called mild hyperbaric oxygen therapy (mHBOT) are fraudulently cashing in on the science that supports medically-approved HBOT”.

She also wrote: “Former chiropractor Malcolm Hooper, who owned the hyperbaric treatment clinic Oxymed Australia, is to stand trial for unsafe practice following the death of a former client who was undergoing treatment for multiple sclerosis at Hooper’s facility.”

TGA initiates court proceedings against Oxymed Australia and director Malcolm Hooper

3 September 2020

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), part of the Department of Health, has initiated proceedings in the Federal Court of Australia (Federal Court) in response to Oxymed Australia Pty Ltd and its sole director, Mr Malcolm Hooper’s alleged unlawful advertising of hyperbaric oxygen therapy chambers.

The TGA alleges the advertising promoted the devices for the treatment of serious diseases Read the rest

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Warning issued about unauthorized soft-shelled hyperbaric chambers. 

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Posted 11 November 2019

In March 2019, Natasha Bolognesi wrote an article for GroundUp, making the point: “But practitioners of so-called mild hyperbaric oxygen therapy (mHBOT) are fraudulently cashing in on the science that supports medically-approved HBOT”. She also stated that “The South African company O2xygenate claims mHBOT can be used for a string of indications including cancer, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, autism, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy amongst others – none of which is approved for treatment with HBOT or mHBOT”.

Now Health Canada is advising Canadians that this treatment needs to be avoided, making the point that “the operators of some private clinics claim it can also be used to treat such conditions as multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, cancer, AIDS, stroke and migraine headaches. There is no scientific proof to support these claims”.

Warning issued about unauthorized soft-shelled hyperbaric chambers.

Health Canada is advising Read the rest

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Quack claims about oxygen treatment are dangerous

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Posted 28 March 2019

Charlatans exploit patients for financial gain, say doctors

15 March 2019  GroundUp

By Natasha Bolognesi

If you go scuba-diving and come up to the surface too fast, you might need Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy. But, experts warn, it can’t treat cancer, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, autism, or arthritis, as some quack outfits are claiming.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is generally known as the treatment to cure “the bends” (decompression sickness) in underwater divers.

The therapy uses high concentrations of oxygen at high pressure, and has been approved for use in 14 conditions including decompression sickness, gas gangrene (caused by a bacterial infection and accompanied by an odorous gas), necrotising soft tissue wounds (as with diabetic foot wounds caused by severe bacterial infection) and thermal burns amongst others.

But practitioners of so-called mild hyperbaric oxygen therapy (mHBOT) are fraudulently cashing in on the science that supports medically-approved HBOT.

Dr Read the rest

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Oxygen therapy: Beware the snake oils sales spiel

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Posted 01 August 2018

Pretoria News / 30 July 2018, 07:36am / Georgina Crouth

Left: Owner, Andries Pieters, Medical Oxygen Supplies in Gordon’s Bay.

Right: Oxygen enclosure 

The King of Pop brought hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) into mainstream consciousness, claiming he slept in a glass chamber with his friend Bubbles the chimp, and gushing that the miracle anti-ageing treatment would help him live till 150.

But while pictures showing Michael Jackson apparently getting his beauty sleep à la Snow White in his home glass “coffin” caused a stir and entrenched his “Wacko Jacko” moniker, it all turned out to be a publicity stunt: Jackson reportedly spent no longer than two hours in the uncomfortable confines of the pressurised medical chamber as part of treatment for a scalp burn wound on a film set.

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