Archive | Sports Supplement

Consumer Watch: Killer gym supplements (DNP (2,4-Dinitrophenol)) widely available in SA

Continue Reading 0

Posted 30 September 2020

By Georgina Crouth  Sep 28, 2020

Cape Town – Marketed as a miracle weight-loss supplement targeting the bodybuilding community, the illegal drug DNP (2,4-Dinitrophenol) is widely available on the black market and doctors are warning that users often pay for their rapid weight loss with their lives.

It’s illegal and potentially lethal, yet unscrupulous sellers are promoting it as a “miracle fat burner”. DNP is said to accelerate the basal metabolic rate, thereby raising the internal body temperature, which can lead to rapid weight loss.

DNP is an industrial chemical, first used during World War I by the French in explosives production. It’s been used as a pesticide, a wood preserver and even a dye.

In 1933, scientists from Stanford University discovered the compound had some fat-shredding properties. It was then marketed as a miracle over-the-counter weight loss drug until reports of adverse effects such

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

The dangers of 2,4-Dinitrophenol (DNP)

Continue Reading 0

Posted 18 September 2020

DNP (2,4-dinitrophenol) is an industrial chemical used in making explosives, but sold with the claim that it is an effective fat burning drug. In South Africa, dinitrophenol is listed in Schedule 4, so is a prescription-only substance. Is that sufficient to prevent unauthorised access, as described in this Guardian story. And why is https://www.anabolics-sa.co.za/product/dnp/ flagrantly selling this product, in spite of bizarrely warning: “beyond dangerous is almost an understatement.’

‘Knowing it could kill you isn’t a deterrent’: the deadly trade in diet pills

DNP is an industrial chemical used in making explosives. If swallowed, it can cause a horrible death – and yet it is still being aggressively marketed to vulnerable people online.

By Susan McKay The Guardian

Published on Tue 21 Jul 2020 06.00 BST

On 11 April 2015, Ella Parry stood beside her small pink car, outside her council flat in Shrewsbury, watching the Read the rest

Continue Reading 0

Sports nutrition position paper backs dietary protein over supplements

Continue Reading 0

There is no physical reason for athletes to increase protein intake with supplements, says the German Nutrition Society (DGE), who recommend a balanced diet to achieve all protein requirements.

In the last of seven position papers by the society, the paper recommends that protein intake depending on training conditions and goals should be at approx. 1.2-2.0 grams per kilogram (g /kg) body weight.

Regarding supplementation. Dr Helmut Heseker, professor of nutritional science at the university of Paderborn states, “In the everyday nutritional routine of athletes there is no physiological reason to supplement protein intake with supplements and a balanced diet is usually superior to supplements.”

Read further

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

When Teen Boys Use Supplements

Continue Reading 0

Posted 23 May 2020

New York Times By May 21, 2020

“I’ve started cutting,” my son, a college freshman, recently told me. He meant he was temporarily restricting calories to lose body fat as part of his new focus on bodybuilding. He planned to alternate cutting with “bulking,” or building up muscle mass, aided by over-the-counter supplements like protein powder and creatine.

Everything he was doing was legal, but was it safe? I also have a teenage daughter, and I was attuned to body-image-related issues affecting girls. But I realized the risks for teenage boys were equally worrisome and decided to check with several experts.

“Almost a third of boys are trying to gain weight or bulk up,” said Dr. Jason Nagata, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco.

Many turn to protein supplements in an attempt to

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

Spain links death to MuscleTech Hydroxycut Hardcore Next Gen

Continue Reading 0

Spanish authorities have issued a warning about a food supplement from the United States after it was linked to a death in Spain.

HYDROXYCUT muscletech spain aesan IovateThe Spanish Agency for Food Safety and Nutrition (AESAN) reported the withdrawal of Hydroxycut Hardcore Next Gen for possible serious adverse reactions. The supplement is a MuscleTech brand, which is owned by Iovate Health Sciences International.

Iovate said it believes the product does not pose a risk to consumers as there have been no reports of adverse events relating to liver toxicity or death with almost half a million units sold.

Spanish authorities reported commercialization in the country is not allowed. However, the company said it confirmed with a local distributor that the product was notified and registered in Spain.

Death in Madrid
AESAN was informed by the Coordinated System for the Rapid Exchange of Information

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

Study finds diverse diet as effective as sports supplements for female athletes

Continue Reading 0

Posted 19 April 2020

by University of Montana

The edge. Every athlete, from the professional to the weekend warrior, strives to obtain that ever-elusive element that leads to victory—sometimes sparing no expense to get there.

A lighter bike, a better training regimen, the newest shoes.

A recently released study from the University of Montana, however, has discovered that common “edge,” sports nutrition products, are no more effective at promoting  in female athletes as regular, carbohydrate-rich, often less-expensive potato-based foods.

“Athletes are vulnerable to strategic marketing. We are easily swayed,” said UM Research Professor Brent Ruby, a veteran endurance  who knows all too well the allure of sports powders and gels.

As director of UM’s Montana Center for Work Physiology and Exercise Metabolism, Ruby and his team have done extensive work in the field of athletic performance and examining the role that post-exercise carbohydrate nutrition plays in the replenishing Read the rest

Continue Reading 0

Prohibited drug found in dietary supplements

Continue Reading 0

Posted 11 December 2019

Piracetam has been touted as a brain-enhancing substance despite poor evidence of its efficacy. Although it is not approved as a drug and is prohibited as a dietary supplement ingredient in the United States, U. S.-based researchers were able to purchase two samples of each of 12 brands of piracetam products online from sellers they identified through a Google search.

Reference: Cohen P and others. Presence of piracetam in cognitive enhancement dietary supplements. JAMA Internal Medicine. doi:https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5507, Nov 25, 2019

Five of those brands were labeled as dietary supplements. Chemical analysis revealed that the piracetam content ranged from 85% to 188% of the labeled dosage. The researchers noted that (a) known adverse effects of piracetam include anxiety, insomnia, agitation, depression, drowsiness, and weight gain, and (b) the effects of the doses found, particularly in elderly consumers with poor kidney function are unknown. They Read the rest

Continue Reading 0

South African Whey and Casein protein powders lack important amino acids

Continue Reading 0

Posted 07 November 2019

This South African study found that  the the majority of 100% Whey or Casein protein powders, e.g. made by USN, Nutritech, Evox , do not contain the levels of protein as indicated on the label. But more seriously, these products claim to build muscle – but have been stripped of essential amino acids so they are not “proper proteins” and therefore, cannot do so, but can only be utilised as fuel.

Subject: 12th IFDC 2017 Special Issue – High protein sports supplements: Protein quality and label compliance

ScienceDirect

12th IFDC 2017 Special Issue – High protein sports supplements: Protein quality and label compliance⋆ Hettie C.Schönfeld Nicolette Hall BeulahPretorius Journal of Food Composition and Analysis Volume 83, October 2019, 103293

Highlights

  • International harmonization of food-type supplement regulations is limited.
  • Protein supplements are not distinctly regulated in S. Africa by local food control.
  • Commercial high-protein sport supplement label
Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

NYT: 10 Medical Myths We Should Stop Believing. Doctors, Too.

Continue Reading 0

Posted 25 September 2019

10 Medical Myths We Should Stop Believing. Doctors, Too.

Researchers identified nearly 400 common medical practices and theories that were contradicted by rigorous studies. Here are some of the most notable findings.

By Gina Kolata  – New York Times – July 1, 2019

You might assume that standard medical advice was supported by mounds of scientific research. But researchers recently discovered that nearly 400 routine practices were flatly contradicted by studies published in leading journals.

Of more than 3,000 studies published from 2003 through 2017 in JAMA and the Lancet, and from 2011 through 2017 in the New England Journal of Medicine, more than one of 10 amounted to a “medical reversal”: a conclusion opposite of what had been conventional wisdom among doctors.

“You come away with a sense of humility,” said Dr. Vinay Prasad of Oregon Health and Science University, who conceived of the study. Read the rest

Continue Reading 0

Fat burning supplements: doctors warned to look out for toxicity after six deaths

Continue Reading 0

Posted 09 July 2019

By Elisabeth Mahase

BMJ 2019; 365 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l2251 (Published 17 May 2019)

The UK has seen a sharp rise in cases of toxicity from 2,4 dinitrophenol (DNP)-an industrial chemical often marketed as a fat burning or weight loss supplement-with 20 recorded cases and six related deaths in 2018, the UK National Poisons Information Service (NPIS) has said.1

Although DNP is labelled “unfit for human consumption,” it is still available and sold to people attempting to change their appearance, such as body builders and those trying to rapidly lose weight.

The spike in cases has prompted Public Health England to send a national warning to all healthcare professionals, telling them to “remain vigilant” for cases of DNP poisoning, and advise any patients suspected of consuming the toxic chemical to “discontinue use immediately.”

The notice, which was sent out to NHS trusts, GP practices, and community pharmacies, outlined Read the rest

Continue Reading 0