Tag Archives | Cosmetics

Are Anti-Aging Creams Legit?

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Posted 18 June 2017

Want a younger, more perfect-looking you? Skin can stay firm and stretchy thanks to protein fibers called collagen and elastin in the tissue beneath the surface. But environmental factors like smoking or ultraviolet rays from the sun can produce free radicals that damage skin cells’ ability to make more of these supports. Anti-wrinkle treatments claim they keep the skin surface fresh and rejuvenate these cells, but do anti-aging creams work?

A short but concise overview from Reactions

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ueEEwg7bck

 

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Advertising cosmetic services that include schedule 4 substances

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Posted 15 May 2017

A media release from the Australian TGA:

The following advice is for health professionals and cosmetic/beauty clinics who advertise cosmetic services that involve therapeutic goods containing Schedule 4 (prescription-only) substances.

These groups are reminded that advertising of prescription-only products to consumers is illegal. Generally, it is an offence under section 42DL(1)(f) of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 (the Act) for a person to publish or broadcast an advertisement about therapeutic goods that contains a statement referring to goods, or substances or preparations containing goods, included in Schedules 3, 4 or 8 of the Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons (SUSMP) (the Poisons Standard). This offence attracts a maximum penalty of $10,800 for an individual and $54,000 for a body corporate[1].

http://www.tga.gov.au/advertising-cosmetic-services-include-schedule-4-substances

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Hoodia Slender Gel – now called Slender Max

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This product has changed its name from Hoodia Slender Gel to Slender Max. However, there is still not a shred of evidence that Hoodia can be absorbed through the skin and result in appetite suppression or weight loss, and until this is proven with robust evidence, this product should be regarded as nothing but a scam. What is required is robust placebo controlled evidence that users will have their appetite suppressed, that this can be verified with decreased food intake (i.e., not simply a “feeling” that appetite is reduced), and that weight-loss has occurred. In other words, the claim “caution – use of this product will result in massive weight loss” needs to be proved, and the name “Slender Gel” implies weight loss – these claims need to be proved.

Update: 21 June 2011 – these scam artists have now changed the name of the product to SlimBetti

[note note_color=”#f8fddd”]CAMCheck Read the rest

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UK ASA ruling: Nivea DNAge Cell Renewal Day Cream

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A magazine ad, for Nivea DNAge Cell Renewal Day Cream, claimed, among other, that the product will result in "firmer skin" and "DNAGE CELL RENEWAL", a product "which boosts surface skin cell renewal leaving you with noticeably firmer looking skin." 

 A consumer laid a complaint with the UK ASA arguing that the claims were misleading, "because it failed to make clear that the cream may only have a temporary, visible effect on the skin", and the product name "DNAGE CELL RENEWAL" misleadingly implied that the product could in some way regenerate cells".

The UK ASA agreed, ruling in favour of the complainant (but not completely).

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Hoodia Slender Gel

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Posted 29 June 2009

A complaint of breach against the previous ASA ruling was laid with the ASA against this product.  To reiterate, there is simply no evidence that any of the ingredients in this product, when taken orally, can fulfil any of the claims being made for the product, and the chance that it therefore works via skin absorbption is simply ridiculous.

The ASA ruled against the product as there is no evidence that the product works, yet the ASA somehow has allowed this company to claim: “all claims for efficacy of Hoodia Slender Gel are based on consumer survey data. This product is not intended to treat, diagonose or cure any disease.” This is simply bizarre!

The ASA code states  very clearly in Clause 4.1 of Section II of the ASA’s Code states “Before advertising is published, advertisers shall hold in their possession documentary evidence as set out Read the rest

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