Tag Archives | whey protein

Sports nutrition position paper backs dietary protein over supplements

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There is no physical reason for athletes to increase protein intake with supplements, says the German Nutrition Society (DGE), who recommend a balanced diet to achieve all protein requirements.

In the last of seven position papers by the society, the paper recommends that protein intake depending on training conditions and goals should be at approx. 1.2-2.0 grams per kilogram (g /kg) body weight.

Regarding supplementation. Dr Helmut Heseker, professor of nutritional science at the university of Paderborn states, “In the everyday nutritional routine of athletes there is no physiological reason to supplement protein intake with supplements and a balanced diet is usually superior to supplements.”

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Exposed! Muscle-building products are whey too low in the good stuff

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Posted 29 August 2018

Far too many protein supplements don’t live up to the claims on their labels and may be ineffective

Times Select – Wendy Knowler 27 August 2018

Most of SA’s bestselling whey protein products don’t live up to the protein content claims on their labels, or meet the amino acid levels stipulated the by health department.

The products (in powder form) are widely consumed by the sports and fitness community to help gain muscle and lose fat, and studies have shown they can be effective – but only if properly formulated.

As part of his Masters research in the field of pharmacy, Durban pharmacist Kiolan Naidoo, along with Varsha Bangalee and Rowena Naidoo, had an accredited lab in Pretoria analyse 15 of SA’s top selling whey protein products. They wanted to find out if they matched the protein analysis on their labels and whether they complied with Read the rest

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Protein hype: shoppers flushing money down the toilet, say experts

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Posted 28 December 2016

USN, Evox and other ‘sport-supplement’ sellers, have been making a range of unsubstantiated claims for high protein products, e.g., “100% Whey protein”. These vary from claiming to build muscle, make you bulk up, and “USN’s new 100% Whey Protein Plus provides the highest quality protein per serving for rapid uptake and its conversion into amino acids and muscle mass by your body” and “maximises muscle recovery & development”. CamCheck has constantly pointed out that these claims are unproven and rubbish (USN/Albe Geldenhuys is suing Dr Harris Steinman for R2 million for pointing out the falseness of his/their claims, among other, these).

An article published in The Guardian now also weighs in on this issue.

Some extracts:

“Consumers fuelling demand for high-protein products unlikely to see any benefits as people already eat more protein than they need, say dietitians. Experts have warned … Read the rest

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Diet supplements threat to liver

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Posted 25 January 2016

From the Medical Journal Australia:

CLINICIANS have been warned to be alert to the possible role of herbal and dietary supplements in cases of hepatotoxicity in the wake of a West Australian man experiencing severe drug-induced liver injury (DILI) after taking a protein and weight loss supplement.

A case report published in the Medical Journal of Australia outlined the experience of a 26-year-old Indigenous man who presented with severe liver injury 10 weeks after taking a whey protein supplement containing green tea extract as well as a dietary supplement containing Garcinia cambogia for just 1 week. The researchers reported that the patient had no previous medical history, did not drink to excess, was not taking medications regularly, and did not smoke or use illicit substances.

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Supplement use might be a sign of disordered eating in men

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Posted 08 October 2015

A recent study suggests that the growing use of dietary supplements in men, driven by the need to attain an ideal body image, might signal a new kind of disordered eating. Researchers found that of 195 men who had admitted to taking legal dietary supplements, such as whey protein, creatine, or L-carnitine, over 40% had increased supplement use over time, and 22% had replaced regular meals with dietary supplements that were not meant to be used that way. Furthermore, 29% of the men actually expressed concern about their increased supplement use, 8% had been advised by their physician to cut back on supplement use, and 3% had been admitted to the hospital for kidney or liver damage associated with dietary supplements.

From Natural Medicines Integrative Medicine Newsletter

Reference:
Achiro R. Excessive Workout Supplement Use: An Emerging Eating Disorder in Men. Aug. 8, … Read the rest

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