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Why Too Many Vitamins Feels Just About Right

Posted 23 June 2022

This editorial published in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) asks:

“Essential nutrients plus clever marketing: it is clear why vitamin and mineral supplements are so appealing. But that begs the question of why it is so easy to market the unproven benefits of these products while it is so difficult to convince people to receive lifesaving vaccines.”

The article is though provoking and worth reading here

In the event of difficulty accessing the site, it is copied here.

JAMA Editorial
June 21, 2022

Why Too Many Vitamins Feels Just About Right

JAMA Intern Med. Published online June 21, 2022. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2022.0119

Currently, US adults spend more than $10 billion per year on vitamins and dietary supplements,1 believing against most evidence that fortified gummy bears and water infused with vitamins will improve their health and well-being.

Read the rest

Intravenous Nutrient Drips: An Expensive Solution to A Nonexistent Problem

Posted 02 March 2022

Nick Tiller
February 21, 2022

Skeptical Enquirer

On the ground floor of a shopping mall in southern California, nestled between a kiosk selling hot pretzels and another selling mobile phones, customers relax in carefully arranged leather sofas while drip bags containing clear liquids drain slowly through veins in their forearms.

These “treatments,” which cost between $200 and $500, are increasingly popular, with similar kiosks and pop-up stores found along high streets and strip malls in the United States and Europe. Even at the exhibition for the Los Angeles Marathon, where runners flock in tens-of-thousands each year to collect their race credentials, runners were waiting up to forty-five minutes to receive a Fitness Drip or an Energy Drip, convinced the infusion would improve their chances of an elusive personal record.

For every ailment, there’s a nutrient drip.

What Are Nutrient Infusions and How Do They Work?

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Evidence does not support vitamin supplementation for heart health

Posted 11 June 2021

Researchers who searched PubMed for the phrase “vitamin supplements and cardiovascular health” have found no significant evidence that supplementation with vitamins A, B6, B12, C, D, E, or K, folic acid, or multivitamins improved cardiovascular functioning or decreased the incidence of heart attacks or strokes in the general public. Their review, based on 87 studies that met their inclusion criteria, concluded:

A recommendation to suggest vitamin use to maintain and/or improve clinical cardiovascular outcomes cannot not be made for the general public. Instead, counseling people to follow a healthy diet, rich in fruits and vegetables seems more appropriate to improve and maintain cardiovascular health.

Reference: Simsek B. and others. Effects of vitamin supplements on clinical cardiovascular outcomes: Time to move on!—A comprehensive review. Clinical Nutrition ESPEN 42:1-14, April 2021

Source: Consumer Health Digest #21-22 June 6,, 2021

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Most doctors agree: You don’t need vitamin and mineral supplements

Posted 15 January 2020

By Malibongwe Tyilo• 14 January 2020

Daily Maverick

The wellness industry is a multi-billion dollar behemoth promising optimal health through supplementation and other methods. Does science back their claims?

“The marketing and selling of multivitamins, and supplements to the general population is perhaps one of the most successful marketing ploys of pharmaceutical companies since we started making medicine. If you have a normally working gut and you do not have a severe malabsorption disease, or if you don’t have a documented vitamin deficiency, like vitamin D or vitamin B12, you do not need routine vitamin supplementation,” says Cape Town-based endocrinologist, Dr Jocelyn Hellig.

“Our stance on that as a medical fraternity is quite clear: there is no evidence for routine multivitamin supplementation in people who do not have documented vitamin deficiencies, or a malabsorption syndrome.”

Dr Jacques Badenhorst, a gastroenterologist based at the Netcare Read the rest

16 supplements are useless when it came to heart health and longevity — even vitamin D, iron, and multivitamins

Posted 16 July 2019

Scientists looked at 16 supplements and found most were useless when it came to heart health and longevity — even vitamin D, iron, and multivitamins

Julia Naftulin , Business Insider US

Jul 14, 2019, 12:22 PM

  • A new study, published June 8 in Annals of Internal Medicine, further suggests that investing in supplement pills and powders won’t reduce your risk of heart-related disease or lengthen your life.
  • Researchers looked at more than 100 prior studies including 16 kinds of supplements and found that only two types, folic acid and omega-3, helped reduce people’s heart-related disease risks.
  • Supplements that combined vitamin D and calcium were found to increase a person’s risk of stroke.

There’s plenty of evidence that suggests stocking up on vitamin supplements to stay healthy is a waste of money, if not harmful to health, and a robust new study adds even more weight to Read the rest

Large-scale study finds most vitamin and mineral supplements have no positive effect

Posted 12 September 2018

Many scientists claim that, for most people, the only outcome from taking vitamin supplements is expensive urine. Now an international team of scientists has added weight to that belief in a large-scale meta-analysis that has concluded that most common vitamin supplements provide no health benefits, particularly in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, stroke and premature death.

Perhaps the most fundamental takeaway from this study is defiantly unsurprising but always worth restating. For those eating a normal, healthy diet, vitamin and mineral supplements are simply a waste of money. Extra boosts of vitamins we do not need will not confer enhanced protective benefits from disease or help us live longer.

Read the article here

Read the rest

Older Americans Are ‘Hooked’ on Vitamins

Posted 18 April 2018

By Liz Szabo, Kaiser Health News April 3, 2018

When she was a young physician, Dr. Martha Gulati noticed that many of her mentors were prescribing vitamin E and folic acid to patients. Preliminary studies in the early 1990s had linked both supplements to a lower risk of heart disease.

She urged her father to pop the pills as well: “Dad, you should be on these vitamins, because every cardiologist is taking them or putting their patients on [them],” recalled Dr. Gulati, now chief of cardiology for the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix.

But just a few years later, she found herself reversing course, after rigorous clinical trials found neither vitamin E nor folic acid supplements did anything to protect the heart. Even worse, studies linked high-dose vitamin E to a higher risk of heart failure, prostate cancer and death from any cause.

Dr. Gulati Read the rest

Vitamin infusion drips

Posted 14 March 2018

A recent craze spreading throughout the world is the use of ‘quickfix’ vitamin infusion ‘therapy’.

Danny Kaye Vitamin Infusion Danny Kaye promotes a vitamin infusion.

This company claims that for their Luminance Drip, costing only R1,500, helps keep your hair skin and nails looking pristine. It contains a high dose Glutathione, along with Vitamin C.

The company claims: “Vitamins and minerals used in our infusions are essential for biochemical reactions in every cell in our bodies. Our wide range of well-being treatments of vitamin infusions, are safe and most effective for sustaining long-term health and well-being”.

Consumers are bombarded by advertising for intravenous “therapy” products, with claims that appear to be truthful and believable.

This is pseudoscience at its best, for the statement seems to be true, but is actually not based on credible evidence for this specific ‘therapy’. For the average person, a balanced diet supplies all your Read the rest

Vitamin and Mineral Supplements What Doctors Need to Know

Posted 8 February 2018

From JAMA

Dietary supplementation is approximately a $30 billion industry in the United States, with more than 90 000 products on the market. In recent national surveys, 52% of US adults reported use of at least 1 supplement product, and 10% reported use of at least 4 such products.1 Vitamins and minerals are among the most popular supplements and are taken by 48% and 39% of adults, respectively, typically to maintain health and prevent disease.

Despite this enthusiasm, most randomized clinical trials of vitamin and mineral supplements have not demonstrated clear benefits for primary or secondary prevention of chronic diseases not related to nutritional deficiency. Indeed, some trials suggest that micronutrient supplementation in amounts that exceed the recommended dietary allowance (RDA)—eg, high doses of beta carotene, folic acid, vitamin E, or selenium—may have harmful effects, including increased mortality, cancer, and hemorrhagic stroke.2

In this Read the rest

Defects found in 32% of multivitamins

Posted 29 November 2017

ConsumerLab.com, a USA company, regularly evaluates products being sold in the USA. Their mission: “to identify the best quality health and nutritional products through independent testing”.

In a report released today, they make these points:

If you’re not careful, you might not get what you’ve bargained for. We discovered problems in 46% of the multivitamins we selected for testing. More specifically, the test showed that…

  • 12 multivitamins contained much less (as low as 24%) or much more (as high as 157%) vitamin A, vitamin D, folate from folic acid, and/or calcium than listed on labels.
  • Many supplements exceeded upper tolerable intake levels — possibly doing more harm than good.
  • Gummy vitamins were especially problematic: 80% failed testing
  • Four multivitamins in tablet form failed to break apart within the required time. One needed 3 hours to fully disintegrate, 5 times the
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