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Vitamins and supplements: what you need to know before taking them

Posted 03 February 2023

The Conversation

If you were to open your medicine cabinet right now, there’s a fair chance that you’d find at least one bottle of vitamins alongside the painkillers, plasters and cough syrup.

After all, people are definitely buying vitamins: in 2020, the global market for complementary and alternative medicines, which includes multivitamin supplements, had an estimated value of US$82.27 billion. The use of natural health products such as minerals and amino acids has increased – and continues to rise, partly driven by consumers’ buying habits during the COVID-19 pandemic.

People sought out vitamins C and D, as well as zinc supplements, as potential preventive measures against the virus – even though the evidence for their efficacy was, and remains, inconclusive.

Multivitamins and mineral supplements are easily accessible to consumers. They are often marketed for their health claims and benefits – sometimes unsubstantiated. But their … Read the rest

Sixty seconds on . . . vitamin drips

Posted 27 July 2019

From the British Medical Journal

Sixty seconds on . . . vitamin drips

Abi Rimmer The BMJ
BMJ 2019; 366 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l4596 (Published 08 July 2019)

Vitamin what?

Vitamin drips. In the latest trend to sweep the “wellness” market, some people are now choosing to get their vitamin hit through “intravenous (IV) drip therapy.” Vitamin injections or “shots” are also available.

Why?

The companies offering these drips say that they have a whole host of benefits, ranging from basic hydration to anti-ageing. IV Boost UK, for example, offers “skin brightening IV therapy,” which it says “lightens and brightens for clear glowing skin”—for £180 (€201; $225).1 And REVIV says its IV infusion therapies “target a variety of wellness needs.”2

Are they a problem?

Some people have expressed concern over the claims these companies are making. On 2 July a company called Get A Drip withdrew its £250 … Read the rest

Vitamin infusion drips

Posted 14 March 2018

A recent craze spreading throughout the world is the use of ‘quickfix’ vitamin infusion ‘therapy’.

Danny Kaye Vitamin Infusion Danny Kaye promotes a vitamin infusion.

This company claims that for their Luminance Drip, costing only R1,500, helps keep your hair skin and nails looking pristine. It contains a high dose Glutathione, along with Vitamin C.

The company claims: “Vitamins and minerals used in our infusions are essential for biochemical reactions in every cell in our bodies. Our wide range of well-being treatments of vitamin infusions, are safe and most effective for sustaining long-term health and well-being”.

Consumers are bombarded by advertising for intravenous “therapy” products, with claims that appear to be truthful and believable.

This is pseudoscience at its best, for the statement seems to be true, but is actually not based on credible evidence for this specific ‘therapy’. For the average person, a balanced diet supplies all your Read the rest