Tag Archives | The Conversation

What are antioxidants? And are they truly good for us?

Continue Reading 0

Posted 21 January 2018

Antioxidants seem to be everywhere; in superfoods and skincare, even chocolate and red wine. Products that contain antioxidants are marketed as essential for good health, with promises to fight disease and reverse ageing.

But are they really as good for us as we’re led to believe?

But it’s a different story when it comes to antioxidant supplements. Research has found antioxidant supplements may cause more harm than good. A 2012 meta analysis of over 70 trials found antioxidant supplements are ineffective or even detrimental to health. 

Read at The Conversation

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

Science or Snake Oil: do skinny teas boost weight loss?

Continue Reading 0

Posted 18 December 2017

From The Conversation:

Weight loss teas are becoming common, with advertisements claiming dramatic results often appearing online. Do the big promises match the results, or do they only match the price tag?

A search of the medical research database pubmed found there are no studies specifically on the use of “slimming teas” for weight loss, but there are studies on green and black tea.

One review of five research trials compared changes in body weight in more than 300 adults at high risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. They gave people either green tea, a fermented tea called Puehr or tea extracts and compared the weight change to people who were given either placebo (non-active) tea extracts or no tea at all.

Continue reading at The Conversation

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

Is apple cider vinegar really a wonder food?

Continue Reading 0

Posted 30 November 2017

By Rosemary Stanton

Published in The Conversation

Folk medicine has favoured apple cider vinegar for centuries and many claims are made for its supposed benefits.

Apple cider vinegar is made by chopping apples, covering them with water and leaving them at room temperature until the natural sugars ferment and form ethanol. Bacteria then convert this alcohol into acetic acid.

Strands of a “mother” will form in the cider. These are strained out of many products but left in others, and are often the target of health claims. The “mother” can also be used to start the production of the next batch of cider.

But will apple cider vinegar really help you lose weight, fight heart disease, control blood sugar and prevent cancer? And what about claims it is rich in enzymes and nutrients such as potassium?

Weight loss

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

Why people believe in conspiracy theories – and how to change their minds

Continue Reading 0

Posted 23 August 2017

This article published in The Conversation, makes the following argument: “The simple answer is that facts and rational arguments really aren’t very good at altering people’s beliefs”. 

We often see this to be true on CamCheck, where facts simply will not alter people’s belief in a CAM, scam or other nonsense claim.

The author adds the following:

“Another reason we are so keen to believe in conspiracy theories is that we are social animals and our status in that society is much more important (from an evolutionary standpoint) than being right. Consequently we constantly compare our actions and beliefs to those of our peers, and then alter them to fit in. This means that if our social group believes something, we are more likely to follow the herd.”

And:

“A related issue is the ever-present confirmation bias, that tendency for folks to seek out Read the rest

Continue Reading 0

Why an ineffective flu remedy (Oscillococcinum) is still being advertised in South Africa

Continue Reading 3

Posted 21 January 2016

This article, copied from The Conversation, asks the question why Oscillococcinum is even on our shelves when the evidence does not support its use for flu.

Prof Roy Jobson, an Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacology, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, writes “A homeopathic flu product is being advertised in South Africa despite the fact that an internationally based review, and an update to it, have found the product to be ineffective”.

It is essential to read his article with this CamCheck article in mind: Absurdity of Oscillococcinum: ASA FAC ruling (opens in a new browser window)

Read the rest
Continue Reading 3