Tag Archives | Testosterone

NYT: 10 Medical Myths We Should Stop Believing. Doctors, Too.

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Posted 25 September 2019

10 Medical Myths We Should Stop Believing. Doctors, Too.

Researchers identified nearly 400 common medical practices and theories that were contradicted by rigorous studies. Here are some of the most notable findings.

By Gina Kolata  – New York Times – July 1, 2019

You might assume that standard medical advice was supported by mounds of scientific research. But researchers recently discovered that nearly 400 routine practices were flatly contradicted by studies published in leading journals.

Of more than 3,000 studies published from 2003 through 2017 in JAMA and the Lancet, and from 2011 through 2017 in the New England Journal of Medicine, more than one of 10 amounted to a “medical reversal”: a conclusion opposite of what had been conventional wisdom among doctors.

“You come away with a sense of humility,” said Dr. Vinay Prasad of Oregon Health and Science University, who conceived of the study. Read the rest

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Sports nutrition: spoiled by ‘wrong and immoral’ marketing

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Posted 09 May 2018

This article, published in NutraIngredients.com, makes the point that “critics argue the [sports supplement] industry is still undermined by some of its practitioners peddling false advertising”.

“The British Dietetic Association (BDA) says that marketing across the industry is ‘wrong and immoral’ and
thousands of people are using protein powders as a ‘substitute not a supplement’.”

Quoting Graeme Close, professor of sports nutrition, John Moores University, pointed to “companies marketing ‘fat burners and testosterone boosters’ as particularly problematic, saying that the claims of purported health benefits were based on thin evidence”. “Some of the advertising by some of these companies is wrong and immoral,” he added.

“You will see some ridiculous claims that you can move from out of shape and overweight in four weeks by taking a pill,” he added.”

As readers of CamCheck will be aware, Dr Harris Steinman is being sued by USN Read the rest

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Teens Receiving Inaccurate Information on Supplements

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Posted 19 April 2017

A new study shows that teenage boys are frequently encouraged to use creatine and testosterone boosters by sales attendants at health food stores, despite American Academy of Pediatrics’ warnings.

Researchers pretending to be 15-year-old high school athletes asked sales attendants at 244 health food stores across the United States for advice on how to increase muscle strength. Creatine was recommended by 67.2% of the stores, 38.5% of which provided the recommendation without being asked specifically, while 28.7% recommended creatine when asked directly if it was not initially suggested. Furthermore, 74.2% of sales attendants stated that a 15-year-old could purchase creatine without a parent. Testosterone boosters were recommended by 9.8% of sales attendants. Study authors suggested that pediatricians should be educating teenage patients, particularly athletes, about these products and discourage their use.

References:

Herriman M, Fletcher L, Tchaconas A, et al. Dietary Supplements and Young Teens: Read the rest

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Drug companies facing massive lawsuit over deceptive “low-testosterone” campaigns

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Posted 20 March 2017

Six sets of defendants are being sued for inappropriate marketing of testosterone-replacement therapy (TRT) with misleading claims. Separate cases have been consolidated into a master complaint that is proceeding in proceeding in Illinois Federal Court. The third amended master complaint summarizes the case this way:

“TRTs were approved for use in the treatment of a medical condition known as hypogonadism, but widely marketed by Defendants for off-label use for a condition invented by Defendants and referred to as “Low T.” . . . Defendants marketed TRTs as safe and effective for this off-label use, when in fact (a) TRTs confer little or no benefit for so-called “Low T” in the absence of”classical hypogonadism”; and (b) the drugs cause serious medical problems, including life-threatening cardiac, cerebrovascular, and thromboembolic events, for which Defendants failed to provide adequate warnings.”

The fact that testosterone levels normally decline as men get … Read the rest

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Teens Receiving Inaccurate Information on Supplements

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Posted 28 February 2017

Teens Receiving Inaccurate Information on Supplements

A new study shows that teenage boys are frequently encouraged to use creatine and testosterone boosters by sales attendants at health food stores, despite American Academy of Pediatrics’ warnings.

Researchers pretending to be 15-year-old high school athletes asked sales attendants at 244 health food stores across the United States for advice on how to increase muscle strength. Creatine was recommended by 67.2% of the stores, 38.5% of which provided the recommendation without being asked specifically, while 28.7% recommended creatine when asked directly if it was not initially suggested. Furthermore, 74.2% of sales attendants stated that a 15-year-old could purchase creatine without a parent. Testosterone boosters were recommended by 9.8% of sales attendants. Study authors suggested that pediatricians should be educating teenage patients, particularly athletes, about these products and discourage their use.

Source: Integrative Medicine Newsletter

References:

Herriman M, Fletcher … Read the rest

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No benefits of testosterone treatments for men

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Posted 22 September 2016

Researchers say there are no benefits of testosterone treatments for men.

Analysis of more than 200 studies conducted since 1950 finds no validity to drug industry’s portrayal of testosterone as akin to a miracle drug for ageing men

“The benefits and safety” of testosterone treatments, the agency [FDA] said in the order that ground the marketing campaign to a halt, “have not been established”.

Now, a group of researchers have announced that they have established the benefits: none.

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Testosterone marketing

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Posted 12 September 2012 

Testosterone marketing frenzy draws skepticism

By MATTHEW PERRONE, AP Health Writer  WASHINGTON (AP) —

“Are you falling asleep after dinner?”
“Do you have a decrease in libido?”
“Have you noticed a recent deterioration in your ability to play sports?”
“It could be Low-T.”

Welcome to the latest big marketing push by U.S. drug companies. In this case, it’s a web page for Abbott Laboratories’ Androgel, a billion-dollar selling testosterone gel used by millions of American men struggling with the symptoms of growing older that are associated with low testosterone, such as poor sex drive, weight gain and fatigue.

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