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Can Supplements Really Help With Depression or Anxiety?

Posted 17 June 2022

SCAM OR NOT

Here’s what the evidence says about what works (and what doesn’t).

St. John’s wort “promotes a positive mood.” Valerian root reduces “levels of anxiety and stress.” Lavender oil is “calming for body and mind.”

If you are among the tens of millions of people in the United States who suffer from depression or anxiety, it is easy to be captivated by the promise of mood-boosting supplements. Take these pills daily, their marketing suggests, and soon you’ll be happily bouncing through verdant, sun-soaked fields, no prescription required.

But, while experts say that some mood-lifting supplements are better studied than others, the wider evidence on their effectiveness is shaky at best. “I’m not saying that there’s evidence that these things aren’t useful,” said Dr. Gerard Sanacora, a professor of psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine

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15 Herbal Supplements You Shouldn’t Try – Infographic

Posted 31 October 2017

From the website, Positive Health Wellness, by Karen Reed

15 Herbal Supplements You Shouldn’t Try

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AHA Warning: Some Supplements can Worsen Heart Failure

Posted 11 August 2016

In a new scientific statement citing Natural Medicines, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns against the use of many supplements in people with heart failure. St. John’s wort, grapefruit juice, ginsenghawthorn, danshen, black cohosh, and green tea are among those discussed for their potential to cause significant interactions with commonly used heart failure medications. Other natural medicines, including aconitegossypol, licorice, and yohimbine are noted for their potential to cause harmful cardiovascular effects, including high blood pressure and decreased heart rate. Ephedra, a banned substance in the US, is also warned against as it raises blood pressure, can stimulate the heart, and make chest pain and irregular heartbeat worse.

For more details on specific drug interactions associated with these supplements, please review our scientific monographs on each product, or try our interaction checker.Read the rest

New York Attorney General targets herbal marketers

Posted 09 February 2015

New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman has sent letters ordering GNC, Target, Walmart, and Walgreens to stop selling store-brand herbal products that could not be verified to contain the labeled substance(s), or which were found to contain ingredients not listed on their labels. The products included echinacea, ginseng, and St. John’s wort. The letters were sent because DNA tests performed as part of the Attorney General’s ongoing investigation found that only 21% of the products contained ingredients listed on their labels. Quackwatch has more details plus links to the warning letters. The investigation was triggered by a New York Times report about a Canadian study which found widespread discrepancies between the ingredients listed on the labels of 44 popular products and those found in the products.

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