Categories

Researchers warn of hazards of inadequately regulated dietary supplements

Posted 15 Jan 2024

After a review of several databases, researchers with Touro College of Pharmacy and Nova Southeastern University’s College of Pharmacy have identified a total of 79,071 reported adverse events related to the use of dietary supplements. The events were reported to U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) between 2004 and 2021. Their searches for adverse-event reports included the use of vitamin E (vitamin derivative), beta-sitosterol (plant sterol) yohimbine, kava kava, kratom, garcinia cambogia, herbal products, and OxyElite Pro (marketed for weight loss).

Key points made in their paper include:

  • Vitamin E supplementation has documented interaction with several routine medications.
  • Over a thousand adverse events regarding the use of a prostate support supplement called Super Beta Prostate containing beta-sitosterol were reported to CFSAN in the past two decades. Most of the reports involved finding blood in the urine.
  • Poison centers
Read the rest

Experts spotlight liver injury from herbal dietary supplements in the U.S

Posted 19 April 2023

Experts on natural products and toxicology have provided an overview of the problem of liver damage due to herbal dietary supplement (HDS) use in the United States. They suggest two strategies they hope will improve consumer safety and drive bad actors from the marketplace. One is a path for pre-clinical assessment and the other is the establishment of a list of products.
Reference: Gurley BJ, and others. Hepatoxicity due to herbal dietary supplements: Past, present, and the future. Food and Chemical Toxicology 169:113445, 2022

Their key points include:

  • The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 provides an insufficient framework for regulating HDS products.
  • 20% of adult Americans regularly consume HDS products.
  • Liver toxicity is among the most frequent serious events reported through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Adverse Event Reporting System.
  • 20% of all drug-induced
Read the rest

How to stay up-to-date on medical scams, quackery, deadly treatments

Posted on 25 February 2019

By Erin Blakemore February 23 2019

Washington Post

A “cure” that seems too good to be true. A doctor who profits from ineffective or dangerous “treatments.” A product that doesn’t do what it says. All three are health-care frauds – and they can cheat you out of more than money.

But how can you arm yourself against these hucksters and scams? The Food and Drug Administrations’s Health Fraud Scams website is a good start.

The site offers information on all sorts of medical scams, from unlawful sales of medication to new products and common consumer boondoggles. It collects news bites and news releases from the agency, including statements on the FDA’s newest product warning letters and updates on criminal investigations.

Conditions such as erectile dysfunction, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and obesity are represented among the FDA’s warnings. A variety of videos can help you boost your Read the rest

27-Year-Old Died After Using a Common Bodybuilding Supplement

Posted 05 October 2017

Supplements may be easily available, but that doesn’t mean they’re risk-free. Matthew Dana, a 27-year-old New York State Sergeant who died in August, overdosed on a supplement called kratom, according to a recent autopsy, calling into question how safe these types of pills really are.

Continue reading at Men’s Health

Read the rest

Kratom, an addict’s alternative, is found to be addictive itself

Posted 04 January 2016

Kratom is derived from Mitragyna speciosa (Wikipedia), a tropical deciduous and evergreen tree in the coffee family native to Southeast Asia in the Indochina and Malaysia floristic regions. Its leaves are used for traditional medicinal properties. It is psychoactive, and leaves are chewed to uplift mood and to treat health problems.

It is available in South Africa*. A recent article in the New York Times argues that it is as addictive as heroin, for which is was used as a recovery from heroin addiction.

* https://www.facebook.com/TranceKei/posts/270936819767355 and http://www.kratomsouthafrica.co.za

Read the rest