Tag Archives | Homeopathy

Ethical pharmacists should not sell quackery

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Posted 09 May 2018

Last week, Ivo Vegter, the editor of Daily Maverick, posted an article arguing that ethical pharmacists should not sell quackery. 

This week, in response he writes: “Last week, I argued for an “ethical pharmacist” certification for pharmacists who do not sell quack remedies, miracle diets and detox cures. This week, let me consider two of the responses I’ve had; one from a pharmacist, and one from a homeopath. One makes a good point, the other does not”.

This article is a worth-while read for a variety of reasons, and in particular for all those arguing that CAMs should have a ‘place in the sun’.

My first reaction was that there is no need to seek a balance between fact and fiction, science and magic, medicine and quackery.

Although a great part of the article addresses homeopathy, much of his argument can be applied to many Read the rest

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UK National Health Service drops coverage of homeopathic, herbal, and supplement products

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Posted 12 December 2017

NHS England has decided to stop covering 18 “low value” treatments, a move the government believes will generate £141 million in annual savings. The list includes seven that have also also been referred to the Department of Health for blacklisting: homeopathy, herbal treatments, omega-3 fatty acid compounds (fish oil), co-proxamol, rubefacients (excluding topical NSAIDS), lutein and antioxidants, and glucosamine and chondroitin.

[Items which should not be routinely prescribed in primary care: Consultation and Report of Findings. NHS England, Nov 30, 2017] https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/items-which-should-not-be-routinely-precscribed-in-pc-consultation-report.pdf

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Australia ends insurance subsidies for naturopathy, homeopathy, and more

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Posted 23 October 2017

The Australian government has eliminated the insurance subsidy for 17 alternative health practices due to a lack of evidence for efficacy.

An article by Scott Gavura, published in Science Based Medicine, makes the following points (extracts):

Public health care systems face criticism when they spend money on treatments that don’t work. With ageing populations and the rising cost of treatments, there’s more and more scrutiny of what these programs pay for. One of the most effective ways that insurance programs can reduce the use of a health service or treatment is to simply stop paying for it. But this is relatively uncommon, because once a benefit’s in place, there tends to be a lot of resistance to change – even if the move was wrongheaded to begin with. That’s one of the (many) reasons this blog has been critical of permitting the licensing of alternative-to-health Read the rest

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NHS to stop paying for homeopathy, certain supplements, and many OTC drugs

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Posted 24 July 2017

NHS England has announced plans to stop paying for prescriptions for treatments that it considers “ineffective, over-priced and low value.” A formal public consultation has been launched on proposed guidelines.
[Items which should not routinely be prescribed in primary care: A Consultation on guidance for CCGs. NHS England, July 21, 2017]

The list includes homeopathic products, glucosamine, chondroitin, herbal products, lutein, certain antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids (some uses), gluten-free foods, and more than 3,200 nonprescription drugs.  
[NHS England launches action plan to drive out wasteful and ineffective drug prescriptions, saving NHS over £190 million a year
. NHS England news release, July 21, 2017] 

Public comments are welcome until October 21.

Source: Consumer Health Digest #17-29, July 23, 2017

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Russian Academy of Sciences Labels Homeopathy a ‘Health Hazard’

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Posted 07 February 2017

CamCheck does not focus on homeopathy but limits its focus to other CAMS. However, occasionally a relevant article that has broader implications, and may be of interest to our readers, will be posted.

It has just been reported that the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) has labelled homeopathic medicine a health hazard. The organization is now petitioning Russia’s Ministry of Health to abandon the use of homeopathic medicine in the country’s state hospitals.

A RAS committee warns that some patients were rejecting standard medicine for serious conditions in favour of homeopathic remedies, a move that almost inevitably puts their lives in danger. The committee also noted that, because of sloppy quality control during the manufacturing processes, some unlicensed homeopathic remedies contain toxic substances which harm patients in a direct fashion. edzardernst.com

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USA: Homeopathic ‘treatments’ to obey the same labelling standards as medicines

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Posted 22 November 2016

CamCheck does not focus on homeopathy but limits its focus to other CAMS.

Here are two articles that relate to homeopathy, scientific evidence, and claims:
“[T]he Federal Trade Commission issued a statement this month which said that homeopathic remedies have to be held to the same standard as other products that make similar claims. In other words, American companies must now have reliable scientific evidence for health-related claims that their products can treat specific conditions and illnesses”.

This is interesting for many other CAMS in the USA do not. Similarly in South Africa, as CamCheck points out, many CAMS do not have reliable scientific evidence for health-related claims.

  • The US government is finally telling people that homeopathy is a sham
    Vox
  • A new ruling finally requires homeopathic ‘treatments’ to obey the same labelling standards as real medicines
    BusinessInsider

The full wording of the US FTC’s … Read the rest

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“Natural therapies” panned in Australia

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Posted 02 December 2015

An Australian Department of Health review of 17 “natural” modalities could result in their exclusion from the partial subsidy Australians receive through their government’s private health insurance rebate. The 188-page Review of the Australian Government Rebate on Natural Therapies for Private Health Insurance covers Alexander technique, aromatherapy, ayurveda, Bowen therapy, Buteyko, Feldenkrais, herbalism/Western herbalism, homeopathy, iridology, kinesiology, massage therapy (including deep tissue, lymphatic drainage, myofascial release, myotherapy, remedial, shiatsu, sports therapy, Swedish, Thai, and therapeutic), naturopathy, Pilates, reflexology, Rolfing, tai chi, and yoga. In 2012, the Health Minister announced that the Private Health Insurance Rebate will be paid for insurance products that cover natural therapy services “only where the Chief Medical Officer finds clear evidence they are clinically effective.” The review concluded that “Such clear evidence has not been found.” However, the current Health Minister has expressed doubts about dropping the rebate on these services. … Read the rest

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Why pharmacists should not sell homeopathic medicines

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Posted 27 July 2015

Mr Scott Gavura, a Canadian pharmacist, has written an article criticising Canadian pharmacists for stocking homeopathic medicines alongside conventional medicines.

We have a similar situation here in South Africa.

Mr Gavura ends his article with this powerful admonition: “Pharmacists ought to know better, and they ought to do better. It’s time for the profession to act in the interests of patients. Homeopathy has no place in today’s pharmacy practice.”

The same applies to South African pharmacists.

You can read the full article at: https://sciencebasedpharmacy.wordpress.com/2015/07/26/pharmacies-professionalism-and-homeopathy/

Mr Gavura also has a facebook page worth looking at: https://www.facebook.com/ScienceBasedPharmacy

It should be noted that in South Africa, according to the standards of “Good Pharmacy Practice” (GPP) published by the South African Pharmacy Council, pharmacists  “. . . must not purchase, sell or supply any medicinal product where the pharmacist has any reason to doubt its safety, quality or … Read the rest

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‘Magic’ vs science: Matter of choice

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Posted 18 May 2015

This article titled ‘Magic’ vs science: Matter of choice, published in the Mail & Guardian on 14 May 2015, is written by Joan Koka, a master’s student from the University of Missouri, Columbia, and presently an intern with the Mail & Guardian’s health journalism centre, Bhekisisa. She discusses homeopathy, CAMS and the Health Products Association approach to the Pretoria High Court regarding the government’s legislative amendments governing CAMS.

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CBC Marketplace exposes homoeopathy

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". . . . the CBC's Marketplace had a show about homoeopathy. One cannot reasonably expect a 20 minute programme to completely explain anything and everything about homoeopathy. Nevertheless, the programme contains no blatant errors, not obvious bias and it is complete enough to give the lay person an idea about what homoeopathy is and what to expect from it."

This article, although re-hashing previous aspects of homeopathy, expresses these points in a novel and thought-provoking way and hence it is highly recommend reading.

http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/302583

The text is reproduced below, but does not contain the useful layout or hyperlinks as in the original article.

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