Tag Archives | Evox

Sports nutrition position paper backs dietary protein over supplements

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There is no physical reason for athletes to increase protein intake with supplements, says the German Nutrition Society (DGE), who recommend a balanced diet to achieve all protein requirements.

In the last of seven position papers by the society, the paper recommends that protein intake depending on training conditions and goals should be at approx. 1.2-2.0 grams per kilogram (g /kg) body weight.

Regarding supplementation. Dr Helmut Heseker, professor of nutritional science at the university of Paderborn states, “In the everyday nutritional routine of athletes there is no physiological reason to supplement protein intake with supplements and a balanced diet is usually superior to supplements.”

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South African Whey and Casein protein powders lack important amino acids

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Posted 07 November 2019

This South African study found that  the the majority of 100% Whey or Casein protein powders, e.g. made by USN, Nutritech, Evox , do not contain the levels of protein as indicated on the label. But more seriously, these products claim to build muscle – but have been stripped of essential amino acids so they are not “proper proteins” and therefore, cannot do so, but can only be utilised as fuel.

Subject: 12th IFDC 2017 Special Issue – High protein sports supplements: Protein quality and label compliance

ScienceDirect

12th IFDC 2017 Special Issue – High protein sports supplements: Protein quality and label compliance⋆ Hettie C.Schönfeld Nicolette Hall BeulahPretorius Journal of Food Composition and Analysis Volume 83, October 2019, 103293

Highlights

  • International harmonization of food-type supplement regulations is limited.
  • Protein supplements are not distinctly regulated in S. Africa by local food control.
  • Commercial high-protein sport supplement label
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We do not need nearly as much protein as we consume

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Posted 03 January 2019

USN, Evox, Nutritech and others claim that sportsmen and those wishing to tone their body, or lose weight, require 100% whey or supplementation with additional protein. BBC News reviewed these claims.

Many of us consciously eat a high-protein diet, with protein-rich products readily available, but how much protein do we really need? And does it actually help us lose weight? 

23 May 2018

This story is featured in BBC Future’s “Best of 2018” collection. Discover more of our picks.  

In the early 20th Century, Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson spent a collective five years eating just meat. This meant that his diet consisted of around 80% fat and 20% protein. Twenty years later, he did the same as part of a year-long experiment at the New York City’s Bellevue Hospital in 1928.

Stefansson wanted to disprove those who argued that humans cannot … Read the rest

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Exposed! Muscle-building products are whey too low in the good stuff

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Posted 29 August 2018

Far too many protein supplements don’t live up to the claims on their labels and may be ineffective

Times Select – Wendy Knowler 27 August 2018

Most of SA’s bestselling whey protein products don’t live up to the protein content claims on their labels, or meet the amino acid levels stipulated the by health department.

The products (in powder form) are widely consumed by the sports and fitness community to help gain muscle and lose fat, and studies have shown they can be effective – but only if properly formulated.

As part of his Masters research in the field of pharmacy, Durban pharmacist Kiolan Naidoo, along with Varsha Bangalee and Rowena Naidoo, had an accredited lab in Pretoria analyse 15 of SA’s top selling whey protein products. They wanted to find out if they matched the protein analysis on their labels and whether they complied with Read the rest

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Targeting school children in marketing campaigns for sports supplements: Is it ethical?

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Posted 31 May 2016

On 17 April 2016, the journalist, Elaine Swanepoel drew our attention in the Afrikaans Sunday newspaper, Die Rapport, to USN targeting and marketing to sport supplements to children. Bizarrely, according to the report: “Yet says Albe Geldenhuys, head of USN, to Die Rapport, that primary school children should not under any circumstances be using supplements”. The text of this article, and commentary, is reproduced here.

In the South African Sports Medicine Association (SASMA) May 2016 newsletter, the selling of sports supplements to schoolchildren is addressed.

“SASMA considers such aggressive marketing as highly irresponsible, dangerous and somewhat unethical as the youth who are involved in the schooling system are vulnerable targets”

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USN/Evox Protein supplements: what you need to know

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Posted 26 August 2015

Prof Associate Professor in Nutrition at Deakin University, wrote this piece for The Conversation. Titled, Health Check: here’s what you need to know about protein supplements,  it makes the point as we have pointed out on CamCheck before, that very few individuals, even sportsmen and women, need protein supplements.

But the decision to use them is based more on slick marketing claims than anything else; protein supplements offer few real performance benefits that an athlete’s normal diet isn’t already delivering.

Continue reading at The Conversation.

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Muscle-Building Supplements Linked to Testicular Cancer

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Posted 22 April 2015

This is a second perspective on a study that concluded that muscle-building supplements are linked to testicular cancer. The first was posted to CamCheck on 14 April 2015.

Men who use muscle-building supplements (MBSs) that contain creatine or androstenedione may have up to 65% increased risk of developing testicular cancer, according to a case-control study published online March 31 in the British Journal of Cancer.

This risk increased even more among men who began using MBSs before age 25, who used various kinds of MBSs, or who used them for a long duration.

Medscape [Requires registration]

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Study finds troubling link between use of muscle-building supplements and cancer

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Posted 14 April 2015

This article was published in the Washington Post, and reports on a “a troubling link between use of muscle-building supplements and cancer” concluded in a study published in the British Journal of Cancer.

Scientists consider observational data relevant but the conclusions are always open to question: is the product associated with or the cause of the findings. In this study, the presence of a dose-response relationship adds weight to any identified association, but still does not prove causality. However the findings are of great concern. How does this apply to you? If you are using USN, Evox, Biogen or any other product, can you be sure that you are safe?

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Evox 100% Whey Protein – not what it seems

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Posted 03 July 2013

Contrary to advertising, 100% whey powder does not build muscle, nor does one actually need so much extra protein for enough can be supplied by the diet. What if a company claims to contain less protein in the product than actually advertised? In our testing, we evaluated Evox and USN products and found both to be deficient. Below is the Evox ruling. The USN one is still pending.

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