Tag Archives | cancer

“Complementary medicine” (CM) use linked to worse outcomes for cancer patients

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Posted 23 July 2018

From a national database of more than 1.9 million patients, researchers identified 258 users of CM who were diagnosed with non-metastatic breast, prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer from 2004 through 2013. This group was compared to four times as many nonusers of CM who were similar in neighborhood of residence, age, stage of cancer, concurrent health problems, insurance type, race/ethnicity, year of diagnosis, and type of cancer. All patients in both groups had undergone chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, and/or hormone therapy. The modalities involved were herbs and botanicals; vitamins and minerals; probiotics; Ayurvedic medicine; traditional Chinese medicine; homeopathy and naturopathy; deep breathing; yoga; Tai Chi; Qi Gong; acupuncture; chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation; meditation; massage; prayer; special diets; progressive relaxation; and/or guided imagery. The findings included:

  • CM use was associated with higher stage of cancer, younger age, being female, having private insurance, higher socioeconomic status, higher income, and
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FDA Pursues Unproven Cancer Claims

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Posted 21 December 2017

December 19, 2017

FDA Pursues Unproven Cancer Claims

Rebecca Voelker, MSJ

JAMA.  2017;318(23):2288. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.19150

Four companies have received FDA warning letters for selling products online that agency officials said made unproven anticancer claims and contained a component of the marijuana plant.

The products reportedly contained cannabidiol (CBD), which isn’t FDA approved for any indication. Such products are marketed in a variety of forms including oil drops, capsules, syrup, tea, and topical lotion or cream. Selling unapproved products with unsubstantiated therapeutic claims violates the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and could harm patients, according to FDA officials.

Claims made on web pages, online stores, and social media touted the products’ abilities to combat tumor and cancer cells, make cancer cells “commit suicide” without killing other cells, and inhibit cell division and growth in certain types of cancer. Some of the products also were marketed as alternative Read the rest

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Products Claiming to “Cure” Cancer Are a Cruel Deception

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Posted 27 April 2017

Products Claiming to “Cure” Cancer Are a Cruel Deception

Food and Drug Administration

Beware of products claiming to cure cancer on websites or social media platforms, such as Facebook and Instagram. According to Nicole Kornspan, M.P.H., a consumer safety officer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), they’re rampant these days.

“Anyone who suffers from cancer, or knows someone who does, understands the fear and desperation that can set in,” says Kornspan. “There can be a great temptation to jump at anything that appears to offer a chance for a cure.”

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FDA cracks down on companies pushing fraudulent cancer claims

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Posted 26 April 2017

FDA cracks down on companies pushing fraudulent cancer claims

By Laurie McGinley April 25 at 4:55 PM

Washington Post

The Food and Drug Administration ordered 14 companies to stop making bogus claims about cancer cures – including asparagus extract, exotic teas and topical creams for pets – or face possible product seizures and criminal prosecution.

The letters covered more than five-dozen unapproved products that the companies touted as preventing, treating or curing cancer, a violation of federal law, the agency said. The items included pills, ointments, oils, drops, teas and diagnostic devices.

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Cancer patients are losing valuable time – and risking their lives – with alternative therapies, doctors say

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Posted 13 November 2015

This article written by Tom Blackwell and published in the National Post on November 11, 2015, may result in those against alternative medicines supporting it without question, and those supporting alternative medicines being highly critical and dismissive of it.

It is important to try to read an article like this with an open mind – and then formulate your opinion. Are the claims true, exaggerated, or devoid of truth? We are posting it simply to highlight a topical issue.

“Research from Alberta, never before publicly reported, suggests that at least one in every 100 breast-cancer patients rejects standard care and doubles her likelihood of death as a result”.

“There is no systematic, national tracking of the phenomenon, but apply those findings to everyone newly diagnosed with cancer, and they suggest almost 2,000 Canadians are exposing themselves to similar risk every year”.

Read the article at the … Read the rest

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More sex = a longer life? Really???

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The local South African magazine Health Intelligence Edition 12 proclaims on its cover: "Passion promotes health – sex for a longer life".

 

(Note: The highlighting box has been added.) On page 20 the article has the title: "Sex, so necessary for positive health: sex is a buzzword that defies trendsetting and social mores, staying top of mind and tip of tongue" and is written by Kirsten Alexander.  It is seemingly supported by 12 "scientific references" .

The Solal Technologies website Health Intelligence includes the following "product information": "Health Intelligence goes further and deeper [than other health magazines], because our focus falls squarely on the facts. Health Intelligence offers breakthrough science, enabling you to better protect your health. Thoroughly researched and using only the latest, peer-reviewed studies by leading international and local experts, Health Intelligence articles are not only credible, they are revolutionary, all the while offering life-enhancing Read the rest

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‘Sad facts about happy pills’ – not so many facts!

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Posted 23 August 2011; updated 17 December 2011


Edition 10 of a local magazine ‘Health Intelligence’ has on its cover a headline: ‘Antidepressant dangers exposed – The sad facts about happy pills’ – an article written by Morné Malan who has a PhD in English.

(The original article being deconstructed can be read here:
Sad Facts About Happy Pills – Health Intelligence Edition 10 page14)

UPDATE (17 December 2011)

Comment 8 of the comments section below contains the following statement by Brent Murphy the editor of Health Intelligence magazine: “Therefore we will be publishing the following statement in edition 12 (edition 11 is already in circulation so it can’t appear in that)”. (emphasis added) This is followed by the promised  “CLARIFICATION” which reads:

In an article Sad Facts about Happy Pills featured in Health Intelligence 10,  it was reported as “FACTS” that antidepressants cause death, Read the rest

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Solal, Sugar Association, ASA – again

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Posted 6 May 2011

The South African Sugar Association (“SASA”) lodged a complaint with the ASA against Solal’s Naturally Sweet product in 2009. The advertisement was headed, “Too much sugar or artificial sweeteners can cause cancer.” On 01 Dec 2009, the ASA ruled against Solal.  Solal appealed and on the 17 May 2010, the ASA accepting the substantiation of the claims by Mr Rael Koping (a dietitian), ruling in favour of Solal. SASA requested arbitration but Solal argued the product had been sold to another company (also Solal owned). So SASA put in a new complaint against the advertising claims for this product now under the auspices of the “new” Solal company.

First ruling (opens in new window)

Second  ruling (opens in new window)

The ASA have ruled against Solal. See the full ruling below.

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Distorting Evidence: A South African Example

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One of the cardinal sins of any researcher is to tamper with their data to make them ‘fit’ the results they were wanting. A recent international example is that of Dr Andrew Wakefield, who published articles in the reputable Journal ‘The Lancet’, which apparently showed a causal link between the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine and autism. Fortunately his deception was uncovered; he was struck off the roll of the General Medical Council in the UK; and The Lancet retracted his articles. The tragedy is that many people did not have their children vaccinated because of this deception, and a number of these unvaccinated children went on to develop measles and some even died. Others may have to cope with the consequences for years to come.

Hot on the heels of the sin of such deceptive fraud must surely be when other persons’ legitimate research results are misrepresented to promote a … Read the rest

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