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FDA warns about tainted arthritis and pain products

Posted 10 Jan 2024

The FDA has identified 25 products promoted for arthritis and pain management that contain drug ingredients not listed on product labels, including some found in prescription drugs. The agency advises these products are only a small fraction of potentially dangerous products marketed online and in stores. Such products may cause serious side effects and may interact with medications or dietary supplements.

Tainted Arthritis | Pain Products

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/medication-health-fraud/tainted-arthritis-pain-products

FDA is notifying consumers of certain products promoted for arthritis and pain management that have been found to contain hidden ingredients and may pose a significant health risk. The public notifications listed below include those products FDA testing found to contain active drug ingredients not listed on the product labels, including some with ingredients found in prescription drugs. These products may cause potentially serious side effects and may interact with medications or dietary supplements a consumer is taking. Consumers … Read the rest

ASA Ruling: Arthro Joint Forte

The radio commercial states, inter alia, “Bioter Health’s Arthro Joint Forté is a clinically proven, natural solution for the treatment of Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis and lower back pain. Its triple-action effect assists with bone and cartilage regeneration, provides pain and inflammation relief and increased flexibility.”

The ASA ruled: "In light of the above, the respondent’s claims are currently unsubstantiated and in breach of Clause 4.1 of Section II."

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Herbal remedies for arthritis mostly ineffective, says study

Tuesday 10 February 2009

This article, from the Guardian, writes that many herbal medicines and other complementary therapies do nothing to help people with rheumatoid arthritis, referring  to a report published today. A review of published data on natural remedies found the majority were completely ineffective at relieving patients' symptoms, or had only tentative evidence to suggest they worked. Read more at the Guardian

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