Tag Archives | Allison Vienings

Vigro – ASA agrees, no evidence it works!

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Posted 10 October 2013

Consumers have a right to expect reasonable proof that a product delivers on its claims.

Natura, the maker of “famous” homeopathic remedies, purchased the Vigro product from PSN Brands, and ignoring the previous ASA ruling which found that Vigro was only beneficial for a very specific form of hair loss, started advertising that it was effective for all hair loss (makes one wonder about their ethics). A request that we made to the ASA for arbitration against the initial ruling, arguing that Vigro was completely ineffective, could therefore not proceed. However, it did allow a new complaint to be laid with the ASA arguing again that Vigro is ineffective for all forms of hair loss.

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Vigro – balderdash!

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Posted 05 July 2013

The ASA has previously ruled against the claims for Vigro. We had argued that preventing or curing hair loss would be a “holy grail” and on face value, the claims are impossible. Vigro’s expert, Mr John Knowlton, argued that the science in support of Vigro’s claims are valid for individuals who are affected by a specific form of hair loss and not all forms of hairloss. The product Vigro has subsequently been sold to Natura, a manufacturer of homeopathic products, and they are now aggressively marketing this product as being effective for hair loss.

Here we examine the ingredients and the “proof” supplied by Mr Knowles and the manufacturer, and show that the evidence in favour of this product working in ANY form of hairloss, is in fact balderdash.  A new complaint has been laid with the ASA.

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ASA opinion: Patrick Holford fails science again

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Posted 31 January 2012

A consumer lodged a complaint with the ASA against a radio commercial advertising Patrick Holford’s “Mood Food” as heard during 2011. The advertisement features Patrick Holford stating as follows:

“So you often suffer from a low mood or lack of motivation? My name is Patrick Holford and I’d like to tell you how to get back your Feel Good Factor. There are five essential nutrients that help to improve mood, by making the feel good chemicals in your brain. These are: Chromium, Vitamin D, and energising B Vitamins plus the amino acids Tyrosine and Tryptophan. All these are contained in my Mood Food Supplement. Visit holforddirect.co.za or your pharmacy, and ask for Patrick Holford’s Mood Food”. 

In essence, the complainant submitted that there is no evidence to show that any of the ingredients contained in the respondent’s product are effective at improving mood or reducing Read the rest

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Clicks Slim Drops Herbal Tincture: ASA ruling

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Posted 27 October 2011

This ruling is interesting for it brings up the issue of "scientific substantiation", "conflict of interest*", "recusal", and "a pharmacist's ethics" very clearly. 

I find it unfathomable and unconscionable that Ms Allison Vienings has yet again attempted to substantiate a highly dubious product (albeit unsuccessfully) on an ingredients basis and not "whole product" basis. 

Allison Vienings is a paid-up registered pharmacist with the SA Pharmacy Council and the Executive Director of the SMASA (Self Medication Manufacturers Association of South Africa). 

Although Clicks is not a member of SMASA, other companies selling similar unsubstantiated medicines, e.g., Dischem, are. Therefore this can be seen as a conflict  of interest. Should she not, ethically, have recused herself and not have accepted the "assignment" from Clicks to substantiate the product? Should she not at least have notified the ASA of a possible conflict of interest? Read the rest

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Clicks Apple Cider With Green Tea: ASA ruling

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Posted 27 October 2011

A consumer laid a complaint against packaging for Clicks’ Apple Cider with Green Tea. The packaging seen from the front promotes the product as “Weight Loss Support” and claims that it: “Helps to: • Promote energy levels to assist fat break down • Increase antioxidant levels”. In essence, the complainant submitted that the claims made on its packaging are misleading as there is no evidence in terms of the Code that the claims are true or possible. The complainant also searched the Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database (a source often used by practitioners of complementary medicine) but found nothing to show that the ingredients in the combination used have the claimed effects.

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ASA ruling: Slimbetti Fibre Slim

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Posted 07 September 2011

From the same scam artists (Jasmine and Christopher Grindlay) who brought you Hoodia Slender Gel, Slender Max. As soon as the ASA rules against their products, they relaunch them under new branding. Has the ASA bared it’s teeth? Will they believe Allison Vienings (“the expert”), who has “substantiated” a number of other products that I regard as scam products?

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ASA Ruling: Slimbetti Thermo Advance

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Posted: 07 September 2011

From the same scam artists (Jasmine and Christopher Grindlay) who brought you Hoodia Slender Gel, Slender Max. As soon as the ASA rules against their products, they relaunch them under new branding. Has the ASA bared it’s teeth? Will they believe Allison Vienings (“the expert”), who has “substantiated” a number of other products that I regard as scam products?

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