Sports nutrition position paper backs dietary protein over supplements

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There is no physical reason for athletes to increase protein intake with supplements, says the German Nutrition Society (DGE), who recommend a balanced diet to achieve all protein requirements.

In the last of seven position papers by the society, the paper recommends that protein intake depending on training conditions and goals should be at approx. 1.2-2.0 grams per kilogram (g /kg) body weight.

Regarding supplementation. Dr Helmut Heseker, professor of nutritional science at the university of Paderborn states, “In the everyday nutritional routine of athletes there is no physiological reason to supplement protein intake with supplements and a balanced diet is usually superior to supplements.”

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FDA warns consumers to avoid HCG weight-loss products

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Posted 30 July 2020

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is advising consumers to avoid human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) weight-loss products. These products are typically sold in the form of oral drops, pellets and sprays, and can be found online, at weight loss clinics and in some retail stores. Claims that HCG can “reset your metabolism” and change abnormal eating patterns are unsubstantiated. HCG is a hormone produced by the placenta during pregnancy. The FDA has approved HCG as a prescription drug for the treatment of female infertility and for other medical conditions, but not for weight loss and not for use without a prescription for any purpose. Marketing of HCG for weight loss is typically accompanied by the recommendation to limit calorie intake to 500 per day, which is dangerous.

Avoid dangerous HCG products. FDA consumer update, July 13, 2020

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Evidence for using bioidentical hormones found lacking

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Posted 14 July 2020

An ad hoc committee convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support the clinical utility of custom-compounded bioidentical hormone therapy (cBHT). Unlike the dozens of hormone therapy products that have been reviewed for safety and efficacy and are FDA-approved for treating symptoms resulting from natural, age-related hormone changes or other endocrine-based disorders, cBHT preparations are not required to be proven safe or effective before they are dispensed to patients. The NAS committee recommends: (a) restricting the use of cBHT preparations, (b) assessment of their difficulty to compound, and (c) additional education, oversight, and research. An estimated 26 to 33 million prescriptions for cBHT preparations cost upwards of $2 billion annually.

Reference: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Highlights: The clinical utility of compounded bioidentical hormone therapy (cBHT): A review of safety, effectiveness, and useRead the rest

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Criminal charges against promoters of MMS as COVID-19 cure

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Posted 14 July 2020

Mark Grenon, 62, and his sons, Jonathan Grenon, 34, Jordan Grenon, 26, and Joseph Grenon, 32, who allegedly marketed “Miracle Mineral Solution” (MMS), a toxic bleach, as a cure for COVID-19, have been charged with conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and criminal contempt.

Reference: Father and sons charged in Miami federal court with selling toxic bleach as fake “miracle” cure for covid-19 and violating court orders. US Attorney’s Office Southern District of Florida news release. July 8, 2020

According to the criminal complaint affidavit, the Grenons allegedly:

  • directed their customers to ingest MMS, a solution that contains sodium chlorite and water, which causes the solution to become chlorine dioxide, a powerful bleach
  • claimed that MMS can treat, prevent, and cure COVID-19
  • marketed MMS as a miracle cure-all for dozens of other serious diseases
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No evidence that vitamin D prevents coronavirus, say experts

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Posted 30 June 2020

Nice says topic is under review, but still advises taking supplements for bone health

Haroon Siddique Published on Mon 29 Jun 2020 18.12 BST

The Guardian

No evidence exists to support taking vitamin D supplements to prevent Covid-19, UK public health experts have found.

A rapid review of evidence for claims that the so-called sunshine vitamin could reduce the risk of coronavirus was launched amid concerns about the disproportionate number of black, Asian and minority ethnic people contracting and dying from the disease. Higher levels of melanin in the skin lead to less absorption of vitamin D from sunlight.

However, on Monday, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) said that, having examined five studies, it had not found evidence to support any benefit from vitamin D with respect to Covid-19.

“While there are health benefits associated with vitamin D, our rapid evidence summary Read the rest

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Ketovatru – Major scam – beware!

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Posted 29 June 2020

Ketovatru is promoted as a weight-loss product. The company claims that Prof Tim Noakes and Dr Moll endorse this product.

The scam even appears to show Prof Noakes responding to comments – but these are lies – they are not his comments.

Neither Dr Moll nor Prof Noakes have endorsed this product, and the scam artists are using their names and photos without permission. Furthermore, there are many comments on Facebook pointing out that money was taken and no product delivered.

Beware, avoid.

Ketovatru advert

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Why do some registered medical practitioners promote CAM interventions?

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Posted 27 June 2020

An opinion, published in the Friends of Science in Medicine newsletter.

Why do some doctors, equipped with a science-based degree offering so many opportunities for a satisfying  professional  career,  join  the  ranks  of  raggle-taggle  quacks and  self-proclaimed experts?  These  range  from  outright  shonks  (eg  Gwyneth  Paltrow)  to  the  sincere,  but  befuddled, followers of rigid, ancient, pre-scientific belief systems.

I offer some thoughts on what might or might not answer this question.

  1. Science is hard work
    Learning can be described as ‘shallow’, ‘deep’ or ‘strategic’. Some students manage to scrape through  their  medical  degree  without  a  genuine  understanding  of  biomedical  science.  How  else could one explain their willingness to embrace pseudo-science?
  1. ‘Transactional’ medicine is unsatisfying
    Rather  than  simply  expanding  their  concept  of  good  medical  care,  some  make  a  ‘mind-body’  connection  through pseudo-science. They don’t realise that psychological medicine is as heavily reliant on science as is
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Why SECTION27 and TAC are involved in a court case about complementary medicines

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Posted 01 June 2020

28th May 2020 Tendai Mafuma and Julia Chaskalson

Those who manufacture or sell complementary medicines often make claims about what these medicines contain and all the diseases they prevent or cure. As the public, we might assume that the claims must be true since some authority would stop the sale of these products if the claims were untrue. Unfortunately that is not something we can take for granted.

A set of regulations published in 2017 tasked the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) with regulating complementary medicines – essentially so that the public can have confidence that these products contain what they are claimed to contain and that they do what they are claimed to do. This was an important step forward for the public’s right to know and right not to be misled by quacks.

But yesterday (27 May 2020) the Pretoria High Court Read the rest

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TGA initiates court proceedings against MMS Australia and director Charles Barton for alleged unlawful advertising

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Posted 01 June 2020

29 May 2020

TGA

The Department of Health’s Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has initiated proceedings in the Federal Court of Australia in response to the alleged unlawful advertising of Miracle Mineral Supplement (also referred to as Miracle Mineral Solution) (MMS), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and other medicines by Southern Cross Directories Pty Ltd trading as MMS Australia.

The TGA recently issued MMS Australia with twelve infringement notices totalling $151,200 for alleged unlawful advertising. The TGA also informed MMS Australia that it must immediately remove all advertisements in breach of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 (the Act), and warned that court action may be initiated if the advertisements were not removed within two days.

MMS Australia did not remove the allegedly unlawful advertising. The TGA has therefore initiated court proceedings to obtain an injunction restraining MMS Australia and its director, Charles Barton, from advertising or supplying the relevant Read the rest

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When Teen Boys Use Supplements

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Posted 23 May 2020

New York Times By May 21, 2020

“I’ve started cutting,” my son, a college freshman, recently told me. He meant he was temporarily restricting calories to lose body fat as part of his new focus on bodybuilding. He planned to alternate cutting with “bulking,” or building up muscle mass, aided by over-the-counter supplements like protein powder and creatine.

Everything he was doing was legal, but was it safe? I also have a teenage daughter, and I was attuned to body-image-related issues affecting girls. But I realized the risks for teenage boys were equally worrisome and decided to check with several experts.

“Almost a third of boys are trying to gain weight or bulk up,” said Dr. Jason Nagata, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco.

Many turn to protein supplements in an attempt to

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