Proof – Herbex Slimmers For Men is a fat lie

,

Posted 07 March 2013

Do Herbex products have ANY efficacy?

My colleagues and I say absolutely NO!

Hebex Slimmers for Men has been scamming South African consumers for over 8 years. In November 2005 the ASA was asked to accept arbitration on this product, claimed by Herbex’s “expert”, Dr Sandell (an unqualified homeopath) to have efficacy, versus facts that shows that the claims for the product are highly unlikely. Arbitration was not allowed to proceed based on a legal trick. 

We argued that the dosages of the ingredients of the product were infinitesimally small, that many of the ingredients that Dr Sandell and Herbex claimed reduced appetite, were actually used to stimulate appetite, and that many ingredients had zero efficacy in weight loss and at best were no more than laxatives, and so on. Has a single study ever been performed on this product? No. A major scam product.

Below are the evidence and arguments to show what a major scam this product actually is.   

The claims were assessed by the ASA and thanks to Dr Sandell, accepted as proof that the product works. At that stage (2005), the ASA accepted “experts” at their word without checking the arguments or data. A request for arbitration was therefore requested (the next step in the ASA process). The document in support of arbitration is damning and shows clearly that the “expert”, Dr Sandell, either lied or was incompetent. Am I being unfair? For fairness, examine the evidence posted below yourself.

The arbitration which took place indicated that the word “effective” could not be supported in the claim “effective weight loss.” In other words – the arbiter indicated that the product does cause weight loss, but that it could not be described as effective. I would not want to buy a product that is not “effective” – and I don’t think most people would either.

Readers should be able to evaluate the evidence for themselves: I post my argument against Herbex Slimmers For Men submitted on 07 December 2005 to the ASA (with minor changes in order to make it more readable) where I request arbitration for the product. Note: Although a Dr Sandell (a retired homeopath) “substantiated” the product, my assessment and argument demonstrates without any doubt that reputable and credible evidence was abused and misinterpreted. In fact, there is ZERO proof that this product works, and indeed, the evidence supports that it does not/cannot (beyond a placebo response). In fact, three of the ingredients stimulate appetite and others are used in doses so minuscule that they simply cannot have an effect (and are not homeopathic)!

  For readers who do not want to read the complete posting, here is a summary of the evidence that shows that the ingredients in Herbex is highly unlikely to have ANY benefit (besides placebo response). The reputable Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (NMCD) (“Unbiased, Scientific Clinical Information on Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Therapies”) was used: 

IngredientUse by Herbex contradicts NMCDEffectiveness as rated in NMCD if claim made in HerbexComment
Agathosma (Barosma) betulinaYES – 
Berberis vulgaris cortex radYESEffectiveness unknownStimulates appetite
Capsicum frutescens fructYES Firms stools, not a laxative
Carduus marianus (Silybum) fructYESEffectiveness unknownStimulates appetite
Eleutherococcus senticosus radixNo“Insufficient reliable evidence to rate”Minuscule dose used
Garcinia cambogia 60% extract fructNo“Possibly Ineffective”Dose minuscule at any rate
Gentiana lutea radixYES“Insufficient reliable evidence to rate”Stimulates appetite
Guggul resinaNo“Possibly Ineffective”3,000 or 6,000 mg required per day – Herbex uses 20 mg
Paullinia sorbilisNo“Insufficient reliable evidence to rate”Miniscule dose used (caffeine equivalent less than 1 cup of coffee per day)
Rhamnus purshiana (Cascara) cortexNo“Insufficient reliable evidence to rate”Status revoked by the FDA
Sutherlandia frutescensYesNo effectMay enhance well being, no effect on weight loss
Taraxacum officinale planta totaNoEffectiveness unknownContradictory use, i.e. appetite suppressant / appetite stimulant

 

Advertising Standards Authority of South Africa
Box 41555
Craighall 2024

Re: Herbex Slimmers For Men / Dr HA Steinman / 879– request for arbitration

Your ruling of the 15th November states that the weight-loss claims are substantiated for Herbex Slimmers For Men. I contest the ruling and I submit that the independent, credible expert for this product has erred, and has not adequately substantiated this product. Clause 4.1 of Section II requires that I either disprove the independent, credible expert’s opinion or that I provide “evidence in support of inadequacies as to the validity of the research ….” I will submit evidence that:

  1. Dr Sandell is not credible or an expert in this field
  2. no acceptable clinical studies have validated either the individual ingredients or the composite of the ingredients.
  3. there is no credible evidence from a Complementary medicine or orthodox basis to support his interpretation of the product’s ingredients resulting in his substantiation of the product.

This was based on the following claims: [The website and the claims have now changed in minor ways.]

  • Effective weight-loss for men
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Reduces appetite
  • Increased energy

“The herb Guggul will lower cholesterol as part of the prevention of heart disease. Milk Thistle detoxifies the liver, while Taraxacum stimulates the spleen and eliminates harmful substances from the blood. Herbs such as Berberis and Taraxacum assist as diuretics and laxatives. This slimming and reshaping formula for men contains 12 carefully selected and highly effective herbs in an easy to take “two-a-day” tablet. This product provides eight specific benefits to assist men of any age and lifestyle to lose their excess weight and improve appearance and general health.

  • Effective weight loss for men
  • Stimulating activity
  • Burning calories
  • Reduces appetite
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Cleanses and detoxes
  • Diuretic
  • Gentle laxative
  • Stress reducing

 

Agathosma (Barosma) betulina20 mg
Berberis vulgaris cortex rad30 mg
Capsicum frutescens fruct20 mg
Carduus marianus (Silybum) fruct10 mg
Eleutherococcus senticosus radix10 mg
Garcinia cambogia 60% extract fruct10 mg
Gentiana lutea radix10 mg
Guggul resina10 mg
Paullinia sorbilis10 mg
Rhamnus purshiana (Cascara) cortex10 mg
Sutherlandia frutescens20 mg
Taraxacum officinale planta tota20 mg
A. Dr Sandell is not credible or an expert in this field 

There is no evidence that Dr Sandell is an expert in the field of obesity or weight loss, as required by the ASA’ regulations. In the authorative PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) which enables a search of peer reviewed articles published in orthodox or complementary journals, not a single reference for a publication on obesity or weight loss is credited to Dr Sandell. Similarly, a Google search for publications in non-peer reviewed articles found no references for Dr Sandell. Although Dr Sandell is registered for working as a homoeopathist and in Chinese medicine, it is apparent from his letterhead that he has no special qualifications in these areas (and in particular in herbal remedies).  

B. No acceptable clinical studies have validated this or a similar product 

The first inadequacy of the validity of the research used to substantiate the products is that there is NOT a single published clinical study that has evaluated the efficacy of Herbex weight loss products, and in particular, Herbex Slimmers for Men. The substantiation for its claims of efficacy are based purely on a theoretical evaluation of the efficacy of individual ingredients as set out in the literature (by a doctor with no expertise in herbal remedies or pharmacology). Importantly, there is no published literature in existence that has evaluated the effectiveness (or safety) of the specific combinations of ingredients in the formulation of this product.  

Herbex claims that “the statement that the product is ‘therapeutically effective’ for, inter alia, ‘Reducing Appetite’, or “Increasing Energy” implies the product would deliver beneficial results to the effect of the claims made.” “Therapeutically effective” still requires evidence for substantiation of being therapeutically effective, and it is evident that Dr Sandell argues that this product can be substantiated by the theoretical argument that a combination of homeopathic and herbal ingredients will result in a weight-loss product. 

Herbex also states that “Dr Sandell also submitted that the product is targeted to address the main causes of weight gain in men, which he identifies as inactivity and overeating. He is therefore of the opinion that the product can claim to be a weight loss system for men”. The first and most obvious question is how a tablet, capsule or slimming drops can “target” and be of benefit to a man who is inactive! Does Dr Sandell really believe that “increasing energy” would resolve the issue? (Overwhelming scientific consensus shows that this approach does not work)  

C. No credible evidence to support his interpretation of the product’s ingredients 

Dr Sandell argues that “due to the combination formulation of Herbex Slimmers for Men there is a synergistic action between the ingredients, which enables them to be used in lower doses than if they had been prescribed individually.” How does Dr Sandell know this? How can he prove this if this combination has never been formulated before and this has never been substantiated? He claims that this is based on homeopathic principles but this argument cannot be sustained by the facts. Of the ingredients, only two claim an effect on weight-loss per se: Garcinia cambogia (weight loss, appetite suppressant) and Taraxacum officinale (appetite suppressant). The latter has a history of use as a homeopathic preparation and the former none whatsoever! As the former is not a traditional homeopathic preparation, one can turn to modern orthodox medicine to see if this ingredient has been evaluated. For the latter, if one accepts that it has had a homeopathic tradition of use, then one can compare Dr Sandell’s assertions with homeopathic articles and dosages. 

 

It is clear from the Herbex’s documents that the individual ingredients in Herbex slimmers for Men are regarded as a “Complementary medicine”. If this classification is accepted, I would recommend that information from the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database be used, as it is a highly reputable, widely consulted source for complementary medicines. 

How relevant is the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database? In a healthcare professions email discussion forum, Brent Murphy, regarded as an independent, credible expert by the ASA wrote: “that we should go ’Back to the science‘ and he ’STRONGLY recommend[ed] subscribing to a site called www.naturaldatabase.com “ (the website for Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database). I am a subscriber to this database. Ms Vienings, another “independent, credible expert” according to the ASA, has previously made use of information from this database. In her submission to the ASA on the 30th November 2004 for Bioslim Once a Day, she stated: “See attached monographs from Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database.”  

 

I therefore submit that Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database provides common ground and be used as a source of information for evidence in an arbitration process. Naturaldatabase.com has compiled a scientific review on weight-loss products. This review on the “natural” treatment of obesity can be accessed at: http://www.naturaldatabase.com/(ypheoa55mkhahqnxkb4x5145)/ce/ceCourse.aspx?s=ND&cs=&st=0&li=0&pc=04%2D21&cec=1&pm=5 Using evidence from this review of weight loss products, I would like to focus on certain specific constituents of the Herbex Slimmers for Men product in question: 

 

Summary of effectiveness and use according to Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (NMCD):  

IngredientUse by Herbex contradicts NMCDEffectiveness as rated in NMCD if claim made in HerbexComment
Agathosma (Barosma) betulinaYES – 
Berberis vulgaris cortex radYESEffectiveness unknownStimulates appetite
Capsicum frutescens fructYES Firms stools, not a laxative
Carduus marianus (Silybum) fructYESEffectiveness unknownStimulates appetite
Eleutherococcus senticosus radixNo“Insufficient reliable evidence to rate”Miniscule dose used
Garcinia cambogia 60% extract fructNo“Possibly Ineffective”Dose miniscule at any rate
Gentiana lutea radixYES“Insufficient reliable evidence to rate”Stimulates appetite
Guggul resinaNo“Possibly Ineffective”3,000 or 6,000 mg required per day – Herbex uses 20 mg
Paullinia sorbilisNo“Insufficient reliable evidence to rate”Miniscule dose used (caffeine equivalent less than 1 cup of coffee per day)
Rhamnus purshiana (Cascara) cortexNo“Insufficient reliable evidence to rate”Status revoked by the FDA
Sutherlandia frutescensYesNo effectMay enhance well being, no effect on weight loss
Taraxacum officinale planta totaNoEffectiveness unknownContradictory use, i.e. appetite suppressant / appetite stimulant

    1. Garcinia cambogia 60% extract fruct (HCA) 10 mg (20 mg per day)

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“Effectiveness: POSSIBLY INEFFECTIVE. Obesity. Taking garcinia fruit rind extract orally doesn’t seem to help decrease weight, satiety, fat oxidation, or energy expenditure in obese people. There is some mixed evidence that garcinia might reduce food intake while sustaining satiety, but it’s too early to recommend it for this use. There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of garcinia for its other uses.” (my emphasis) Note, the recommended dose suggested is “For weight loss, an extract containing 50% hydroxycitric acid, 1000 mg three times daily has been used. Hydroxycitric acid, 500 mg four times daily has also been used for weight loss.”  

Herbex Slimmers for Men uses this ingredient in a dose of 10 mg twice a day, a total of 20 mg per day. This controversial ingredient has been shown to have little or no effect in credible studies (see below). Nonetheless, there are a number of overseas manufactures using the controversial ingredient and making weight-loss claims, but significantly, “most manufacturer labels recommend consumption of 3-6 tablets per day of 500-1000 mg Garcinia cambogia per tablet (standardized to yield 250-500 mg HCA) for adults.”[1] In this context how does Herbex justify using a dose of 10 mg twice a day? This dose is insignificant in comparison to the dosage used by other manufacturers using this dubious ingredient.  

Significantly, well conducted clinical studies have shown that Garcinia cambogia has little or no clinical effect. This is summarised in a number of sources: “Present research indicates there is no conclusive evidence that Garcinia cambogia or HCA affects any significant changes in weight.” [1]  

In a twelve-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of G cambogia for body weight and fat mass loss in overweight human subjects, 135 overweight men and women received either active herbal compound (1,500 mg of HCA acid per day) or placebo, and both groups were prescribed a high-fiber, low-energy diet. The treatment period was 12 weeks. Patients in both groups lost a significant amount of weight during the 12-week treatment period but Garcinia cambogia failed to produce significant weight loss and fat mass loss beyond that observed with placebo and diet.[2]  

Hydroxycitric acid is available as a herbal supplement, and promoted as a weight loss agent. It is hypothesized that HCA can increase fat oxidation by inhibiting citrate lyase, an enzyme which plays a crucial role in energy metabolism during de novo lipogenesis. In a double blind, placebo controlled, randomized, crossover study involving three days of HCA (3,000 mg/day) or placebo, 10 sedentary adult male subjects were evaluated. The results do not support the hypothesis that HCA alters the short-term rate of fat oxidation in the fasting state during rest or moderate exercise, with doses likely to be achieved in humans while subjects maintain a typical Western diet.[3]  

The Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute (NUTRIM), Department of Human Biology, MaastrichtUniversity, Maastricht, Netherlands, and the TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute, Food and Supplement Analysis Department, Zeist, Netherlands, conducted a study to investigate the acute effects of HCA supplementation on substrate utilization at rest and during exercise in endurance-trained humans. Their conclusion was that “HCA, even when provided in large quantities, does not increase total fat oxidation in vivo in endurance-trained humans.”[4]  

One study reported an extra loss of around 1.3 kg over a 12 week period for HCA at 100x the dose compared to the dose used in Herbex (2,400 mg/day vs 20 mg/day). Significantly, no appetite suppressive effect was noted: “HCA reportedly promotes weight loss, in part, through suppression of hunger. Eighty-nine mildly overweight females were prescribed 5020-kJ diets for 12 weeks as part of a double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel group study. Forty-two participants ingested 400 mg caplets of Garcinia cambogia 30-60 min prior to meals for a total dose of 2,400 mg/day (1.2 g/day HCA) and 47 participants ingested matched placebos.” Both groups lost body weight with the active group achieving a greater reduction (3. 7+/-3.1 kg versus 2.4+/-2.9 kg). No effects of the HCA were observed on appetitive variables. This study does not support a satiety effect of HCA.[5]  

 

2. Taraxacum officinale 20 mg (40 mg per day) Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states: “People Use This For: Orally, dandelion is used for loss of appetite, dyspepsia, flatulence, gallstones, bile stimulation, rheumatism, arthritic joints, muscle aches, eczema, and bruises. Dandelion is also used as a laxative, diuretic, circulatory tonic, skin toner, blood tonic, and digestive tonic.” “Effectiveness:” Not rated.  

Homeopathic texts do not list this plant as having any effect on weight-loss or appetite. The herb’s main effects are: “all parts of the plant have a mild stimulating effect on the liver, and aid congestion. It has diuretic and detoxifying properties.” (New Mexico State University: Medicinal plants of the South West.)[6] The few that do mention appetite claim that it is an appetite stimulant!

  “Dandelion (the entire plant preparation) has been used for stimulating appetite and for relieving stomach fullness and gas (dyspepsia). Dandelion leaf has been used for stimulating the appetite, and for promoting water loss and blood circulation.” www.medicinenet.com [7]  

Taraxacum officinale is an appetite stimulant. Australian Naturopathic Network. [8]  

No clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate this plant’s effect on appetite or weight loss. One can only conclude that when so many diverse and conflicting opinions on the efficacy of an ingredient is given, that the efficacy of the ingredient is in doubt. Importantly, Herbex uses this ingredient in the dose of 20 mg twice a day. The recommended dose is 3,000-5,000 mg of dried root three times a day or 4,000-10,000 mg of dried leaf three times a day.  [9]  

 

3. Agathosma (Barosma) betulina: 20 mg (40mg per day)

Also known as Buchu

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“People Use This For: Orally, buchu is used as a urinary tract disinfectant in cystitis, urethritis, prostatitis, acute cystitis, kidney infections, and venereal disease.”

“Effectiveness: There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of buchu.”  

 

4. Berberis vulgaris cortex rad 30 mg (60 mg per day)

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“People Use This For: Orally, the fruit of European barberry is used for kidney, urinary tract, and gastrointestinal tract discomforts such as heartburn, stomach cramps, constipation, lack of appetite, etc.” (my emphasis, i.e., may stimulate appetite)

“Effectiveness: There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of European barberry.”

 

5. Capsicum frutescens fruct 20 mg (40 mg per day)

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“People Use This For: Orally, capsicum is used for dyspepsia, flatulence, colic, diarrhea, cramps, toothache, to improve peripheral circulation, for reducing blood clotting tendencies, seasickness, swallowing dysfunction, alcoholism, malaria, fever, hyperlipidemia, and preventing arteriosclerosis and heart disease.” (my emphasis, i.e., may result in firmer stools and not have a laxative effect)

Effectiveness: Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database does not mention weight loss or appetite suppression

 

6. Carduus marianus (Silybum) fruct 10 mg (20 mg per day)

Also known as Milk Thistle

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“People Use This For: Orally, milk thistle is used for liver disorders including toxic liver damage caused by chemicals, Amanita phalloides mushroom poisoning, jaundice, chronic inflammatory liver disease, hepatic cirrhosis, and chronic hepatitis. It is also used orally for loss of appetite, dyspepsia and gallbladder complaints, hangover, and diseases of the spleen. Milk thistle is used orally for prostate cancer, pleurisy, malaria, depression, uterine complaints, stimulating breast milk flow, and stimulating menstrual flow.” (my emphasis, i.e., may stimulate appetite)  

“Effectiveness:” only rated for Dyspepsia (POSSIBLY EFFECTIVE) and INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE for Amanita mushroom poisoning, Diabetes, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C and Toxin-induced liver damage.  

 

7. Eleutherococcus senticosus radix 10 mg (20 mg per day)

Also known as Ginseng, Siberian

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“People Use This For: Orally, people use Siberian ginseng as an adaptogen, for increasing resistance to environmental stress. It is also used orally for normalizing high or low blood pressure, atherosclerosis, pyelonephritis, craniocerebral trauma, rheumatic heart disease, neuroses, insomnia, and increasing work capacity. Other oral uses include Alzheimer’s disease, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), chronic fatigue syndrome, diabetes, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, influenza, chronic bronchitis, tuberculosis, improving athletic performance, reducing toxicity of chemotherapy, and symptomatic treatment of herpes simplex type II infections. It is also used orally as a general stimulant, diuretic, appetite stimulant, immune system stimulant, and for preventing colds and flu. In manufacturing, Siberian ginseng is added to skin care products.”

“Effectiveness:

POSSIBLY INEFFECTIVE Athletic performance.

INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE : Cognitive performance. There is preliminary evidence that suggests Siberian ginseng might improve memory and feelings of well-being in middle-aged people. Heart disease. There is preliminary evidence that suggests administering Siberian ginseng intravenously might be useful for hyperlipidemia, and arrhythmias. Ischemic stroke. There is preliminary evidence that suggests administering Siberian ginseng intravenously might be useful for treating acute cerebral infarction.”

“Dosage/Administration: ORAL: For herpes simplex type II infections, Siberian ginseng extract standardized to contain eleutheroside E 0.3% in doses of 400 mg per day has been used.”  

 

8. Gentiana lutea radix 10 mg (20 mg per day)

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“People Use This For: Orally, gentian is used for digestive disorders, such as loss of appetite, fullness, flatulence, diarrhea, gastritis, heartburn, and vomiting. It is used orally for fever; hysteria; hypertension; and stimulating menstrual flow; and as an antispasmodic, anthelmintic, and antiseptic.” (my emphasis, i.e., may stimulate appetite)  

“Effectiveness: POSSIBLY EFFECTIVE – Sinusitis. Taking gentian orally in a specific combination product that also contains elderflower, verbena, cowslip flower, and sorrel (SinuComp, Sinupret) seems to help treat acute or chronic sinusitis Clinical studies have used Sinupret. There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of gentian for its other uses.  

 

9. Guggul resina 10 mg (20 mg per day)

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“People Use This For: Orally, guggul gum resin is used for arthritis, lowering high cholesterol, atherosclerosis, nodulocystic acne, skin diseases, and weight loss.

“Effectiveness:

POSSIBLY EFFECTIVE – Nodulocystic acne.

POSSIBLY INEFFECTIVE – Hypercholesterolemia. Taking guggul orally in doses of 3000 or 6000 mg per day doesn’t seem to lower total cholesterol or triglycerides, or raise high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in people on Western diets. It seems to increase low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by 9% to 10%. This is in contrast to studies of guggul in Indian populations, where guggul seems to lower total cholesterol, LDL, and triglycerides.

INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE – Obesity. There’s some clinical evidence that suggests that guggul in combination with phosphate, hydroxycitric acid, and L-tyrosine plus exercise and calorie restriction might result in modest weight loss. Osteoarthritis. Preliminary clinical evidence suggests that guggul (containing 3.5% guggulsterones) 500 mg three times daily might improve osteoarthritis pain. More evidence is needed to rate guggul for these uses.”  

“Dosage/Administration: ORAL: For hypercholesterolemia, a guggul extract (guggulipid), providing 75 to 150 mg of guggulsterones daily, has been given as 1000 to 2000 mg doses 2 to 3 times daily for up to 8 weeks.”  

 

10. Paullinia sorbilis 10 mg (20 mg per day)

Also known as Guarana

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“Effectiveness: INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE – Obesity. Guarana taken orally might cause weight loss when used in combination with mate and damiana. There is also preliminary evidence that a specific combination product containing guarana, ephedra, and 17 other vitamins, minerals, and supplements might help reduce weight by approximately 2.7 kg over eight weeks when used with a low-fat diet and exercise. More evidence is needed to rate guarana for this use.  

Interactions with Diseases or Conditions: ANXIETY DISORDERS: The caffeine in guarana might aggravate anxiety disorders.
CARDIAC CONDITIONS: Caffeine in guarana can induce cardiac arrhythmias in sensitive individuals; use with caution.
DIABETES: Some research suggests that caffeine, a constituent of guarana, may impair postprandial glucose metabolism in people with diabetes and contribute to insulin resistance. The effect of caffeinated beverages and herbs has not been studied. Caffeine in guarana may enhance the frequency and intensity of hypoglycemic warning symptoms in type 1 diabetics. This may increase the ability of diabetics to detect and treat hypoglycemia early. However, it might also increase the frequency of hypoglycemic events.  

 

11. Rhamnus purshiana (Cascara) cortex 10 mg (20 mg per day)

Also known as Cascara or Buckthorn

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database states:

“Effectiveness: LIKELY EFFECTIVE – Constipation. Taking cascara orally has laxative effects and helps for treating constipation. Cascara was formerly FDA-approved as safe and effective, but this designation was removed in 2002 because of lack of supporting evidence. (my emphasis)

There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of cascara for its other uses. 20-30 mg per day of the active ingredient, hyroxyanthracene derivatives, has been used. This is calculated as cascaroside A, from the cut bark, powder, or extracts.  

 

12. Sutherlandia frutescens 20 mg (40 mg per day)

No information in Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database.

However, the website of Sutherlandia frutescens at http://www.sutherlandia.org/ states that: “Sutherlandia frutescens is amongst other things used as a “tonic” for:

  • wasting from cancer, TB, and AIDS
  • appetite stimulant in wasted patients, but not in healthy people.

These purported claims have not yet been substantiated and are still being researched.  

 

Concluding remarks

Herbex slimmers name implies the major use of this product is for weight-loss. This is further stated “Effective weight-loss for men“. Other claims, e.g.; lowers cholesterol, reduces appetite, etc, are secondary to the weight loss claims. It is very clear that Dr Sandell’s cannot acceptably substantiate Herbex Slimmers for weight loss – the major ingredient for weight-loss is insignificant in dose, one ingredient reduces appetite but two stimulate appetite. The dosages used for the two most important ingredients are infinitesimally small compared to what is used by other manufacturers or recommended by reputable monographs or orthodox studies. Even if one accepts the argument that there is a “synergistic action between the ingredients”, there is simply no way that the other ingredients in this preparation will result in a 100 fold increase in the effectiveness of these two ingredients. It is also clear that the ingredient for lowering cholesterol has not been adequately validated, and in any event, is being used at an insignificant dose.      

 

References:


[1] USACHPPM Directorate of Health Promotion and Wellness http://chppm-www.apgea.army.mil/dhpw/Wellness.aspx
[2] Heymsfield S, Allison D, Vasselli J, Pietrobelli A, Greenfield D, Nunez C. Garcinia cambogia (hydroxycitric acid) as a potential antiobesity agent: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 1998;280(18):1596-600.
[3] Kriketos AD, Thompson HR, Greene H, Hill JO. (-)-Hydroxycitric acid does not affect energy expenditure and substrate oxidation in adult males in a post-absorptive state. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1999 Aug;23(8):867-73.
[4] Luc JC van Loon, Johannes JM van Rooijen, Bas Niesen, Hans Verhagen, Wim HM Saris and Anton JM Wagenmakers Effects of acute (-)-hydroxycitrate supplementation on substrate metabolism at rest and during exercise in humans. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2000;72(6):1445-1450
[5] Mattes RD, Bormann L. Effects of (-)-hydroxycitric acid on appetitive variables. Physiol Behav. 2000 Oct 1-15;71(1-2):87-94.
[6] http://medplant.nmsu.edu/taraxcum.html
[9] http://www.deliciouslivingmag.com/healthnotes/healthnotes.cfm?ContentID=2078009
[note note_color="#f6fdde" radius="4"]CamCheck posts related to Herbex
(Link opens in new browser window)
[/note]

 

,

2 Responses to Proof – Herbex Slimmers For Men is a fat lie

  1. jimmy franklin 7 September, 2017 at 3:29 am #

    I was diagnosed with HepB 3 months ago and was devastated by the news. I have been ill and sore for over 10 years, with no one being able to figure out what was wrong with me. It was always written off as a virus or infection. Then 2 years ago the severe muscle cramps started. I had them from scalp to toes, and it was when they ran the full spectrum of tests to figure the cramps out, that they discovered the HepB along with severe Vitamin D deficiency, which I link to the HepB. I was so tired and nauseous and in constant pain. I am just sick and tired of feeling sick and tired!!nothing was really working to help my condition.I went off the Sebivo (with the doctor’s knowledge) and started on hepatitis B herbal formula i ordered from Natural Herbs Center, my symptoms totally declined over a 5 weeks use of the hepatitis B virus natural herbal formula the disease is totally reversed!! Visit there website or email xxx xxx

    • Harris 7 September, 2017 at 8:08 am #

      The site Jimmy is referring to is PERFECT HEALTH HERBS. The website’s claims are false, and the treatment of the conditions claimed, a scam. For example, the website claims that they can cure Hep B, ALS, cancer, asthma, etc. These are blatant lies. One has to have a high degree of psychopathic traits to try to take advantage of people suffering with these conditions.

      Avoid this company and its products.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.