Herbex Attack the Fat – Scam?

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Posted 20 January 2013

The purpose of CAMCheck is to point out the scientific irrational basis for CAM products and the ethical and moral failures of those manufacturing, selling and regulating them.

As previously mentioned on CAMCheck, we do not usually identify owners of companies selling products with little to no proof of efficacy unless they give clear evidence of showing an unwillingness to take heed, i.e., by not withdrawing the product when exposed, and/or by rolling out further new products with little to no proof that they really work. (If there is no proof that a product works, it can be suspected of being no more than a scam – and many of Herbex’s products fit this description – see example below)

Eddie Bisset (CEO) and Diane Bisset (Financial Director) of Herbex have made a fortune from the misfortunes of consumers. Is this comment unfair? Compare our assessment of the evidence of Attack the Fat versus theirs, then decide for yourself. Are we “defaming” the Bissets? Read this for context.

As the Bissets image is copyrighted, we cannot show it here. It is however legal to have a click through link to an image of  Eddie and Diane Bisset or to view their images on Google.
Not only have they been selling inadequately  substantiated weight loss and other nonsense products for more than 15 years, but they continue to roll out new products – with zero proof of efficacy* – often using ingredients with no evidence of use for the claimed conditions and/or used at dosages that are too low to have any effect anyway!

* Not a single study has been conducted to see whether their alchemy of ingredients, used at miniscule doses, has any effect on users.

Instead of using evidence (proof) to silence their critics, they have used legal means to try to stop scrutiny of the products and legal means to try to block even regulatory bodies from examining the credentials of their “expert”, Dr Sandell, an unqualified retired homeopath. 

They are selling a food product, Herbex Slimmers Cereal, which is against Food Legislation (R146) (cannot make health claims). 

How much money do these products make for the Bissets? Here are the facts from Herbex’s own documents:

Herbex claimed, after the ASA ruled against the claims for their Attack the Fat Range, which is the biggest percentage contributor to their turnover, and if an immediate drop in sales had to occur when the advertising is stopped, that.

  1. The Attack the Fat Range is the biggest percentage contributor to Herbex’s turnover, and if an immediate drop in sales occurs when the advertising is stopped, that,
  2. Herbex expects a 30% drop in sales after the first month of the cessation of advertising with further reductions probable.
  3. Herbex estimates its potential loss as a consequence of being unable to advertise the products i.e. loss of sales and due to retail credits to be approximately R8 473 308 over a 3 month period.
  4. Herbex may also suffer a loss of approximately R3 532 078 in costs over the same period.

Yes, you read correctly – Sales of approximately 8.5 Million Rand over 3 months for product that simply does not have a snowball’s chance of working! See below.

We have the figures in our possession because of having access to the appeal documentation. Herbex is appealing the ASA ruling in our favour against Herbex, and Herbex has to give a strong argument (reasons) for appealing the ASA ruling.

Bisset’s lawyers have threatened us with legal action arguing that the above information (supplied to the ASA in their ASC appeal) is confidential and sub judice. Herbex used this data in order to convince the ASA to allow Herbex to continue advertising until their appeal is heard, pointing out how much money they would lose if not allowed to advertise. (The ASA ruling Herbex is appealing is one in which their “expert”, Dr Sandell, was stripped of his ASA status as a  “credible expert”) 

This is what the ASA code states:
In terms of the ASA Code and general procedure (see Clause 8.3 of the Procedural Guide) the ASA do not regard any submissions as confidential UNLESS confidentiality was specifically requested AND granted by us in terms of Clause 5 of Section I (ASA procedures for evaluating confidentiality are set out in Clause 5.2 and 5.3 of the Procedural Guide). Parties responding to ASA complaints are also advised in the correspondence sent to them when an official response is requested (by saying “Your response will be made available to the complainant” or something to that effect). The responses are shared with Complainants AFTER an ASA ruling has been made and therefore not regarded as sub judice.

Herbex Attack the Fat – Does it work?

The burning question is whether Herbex Attack the Fat really work or does not.

The fact is that this combination of ingredients has NEVER been tested on humans. Simply a case of someone throwing together some ingredients and hoping that they would work. Of course, the trick is to use ingredients that may do what you want them to!

Herbex has put together a bunch of ingredients that some people CLAIM has positive effects. But Herbex uses these ingredients at such LOW doses, that they are very, very unlikely to have any effect. For example, we know that panado assists in taking away pain, but research shows one needs around 250mg or more. What if Herbex used 1 mg as the dose and claimed that it would take away your headache?

Well that is EXACTLY what they have done for this product. Worse, there is even no good proof that the ingredients can do what Herbex claims that they do!

What you ask? Is this a SCAM?! Here we give you the arguments, ours and Dr Robin Sandell, the so called Herbex “expert”. You be the judge.

At http://herbexhealth.com/attack-the-fat-300ml.html, this product is advertised which makes the following claims:

“Herbex attack the fat is a powerful herbal syrup that will help you lose weight. A few teaspoons a day will help you look your best and boost your confidence.” 

* Breaks down fat
* Controls appetite
* Burns calories
* Cleanses the body
* Improves digestion 

At http://herbexhealth.com/attack-the-fat-300ml.html under the tab “How it works”, the following claims are made:

Buchu:

Buchu will assist in efficiently ridding the body of water weight. It will also help relieve gas and bloating and assist in normalising blood sugar levels.

Green Tea:

Green Tea plays an important role in weight control by reducing appetite and boosting metabolism, which assists the body in burning consumed calories. It contains ingredients that will reduce
the appetite and stimulate the central nervous system. It is also a potent antioxidant to assist in the prevention of chronic diseases associated with obesity.

Citrin:

Citrin satisfies the body’s demands for energy and causes the liver to signal to the brain when enough food has been taken. It also discourages fat storage and encourages calorie burning.

Aloe ferox bitters:

Aloe ferox bitters will assist in cleansing the body. It has a strong laxative and detox effect.

Lemon concentrate:

Lemon concentrate, extracted from pure lemon juice, will assist in digestion and cleansing of the body. 

Not all the claims can be proven – they are what people have used the ingredients for, hoping that they would treat that condition. In some instances, the claims are valid but when used in an appropriate dose – not in the case of this product. For example, if the claim that “panado relieves headache” is made, it is a valid claim when used at 250 mg-500 mg.  However, if used at 1 mg, then the claim “panado relieves headache” becomes misleading for the claim is used to induce you to purchase the product with the belief that the product will relieve headache – but the dose is infinitesimally too small to do so.

Under the Tab “How to use” it states:

1 household teaspoon = 3 ml
For weight loss: Take 3 teaspoons before each meal, morning and evening.
For weight control: Take 2 teaspoons before each meal, morning and evening. 

Each 300ml the product contains (6 ml is the dose per meal):

INGREDIENT   

QUANTITY per 300 ml

Per 9ml dose

Isalene

2621.30 mg

78.6 mg

Purified water

811.90 mg

24 mg

Caramel Colour

1.90 mg

 

Lemon concentrate

262.50 mg

7.9 mg

Agathosma betulina (Buchu)

10.00 mg

0,3 mg

Camellia sinensis 50% extract (Green tea)

18.80 mg

0.56 mg

Garcinia cambogia 60% extract (Citrin)

18.80 mg

0.56 mg

Lemon emulsion

262.50 mg

7.9 mg

Aloe ferox bitters

1.90 mg

0.06 mg

Ascorbic acid

1.10 mg

 

Eucalyptus Flavour

0.90 mg

 

Potassium Sorbate (preservative)

0.05%

 

Sodium Benzoate (preservative)

0.05%

 

A. Any evidence that the product works as a whole?

There is not a single p study throughout the world that has tested this combination of ingredients, or even some of them. This is fantasy land, cloud cuckoo land, mix and match and hope that your mix will work.

And there is no evidence that Herbex have conducted their own internal study; if indeed conducted, they would have had to get permission from the Medicines Control Council to conduct the study. 

B.Any evidence that the individual ingredients works?

Only the following ingredients have potential therapeutic effects:

  • Buchu
  • Green tea
  • Citrin (Garcinia cambogia)
  • Aloe ferox bitters
  • Lemon concentrate

Isalene, the largest ingredient, is an invert sugar chemically modified to form a combination sucrose, glucose and fructose. Significantly, on the product package it claims to not contain isaline but sorbitol!

Ascorbic acid has been added either for its anti-oxidant value, or the alternative form, Vitamin C, in which case the dose is negligible.

The remaining ingredients are flavourants and preservatives. 

Is there any evidence that the individual ingredients can have any effect?

Herbex Attack the Fat’s main claims are claim is that the product “attacks fat”, i.e., Breaks down fat, Controls appetite, and Burns calories. 

1.  Buchu

Buchu is used in this ingredient at 0,3 mg per dose.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database [i] (NMCD) (“Unbiased, Scientific Clinical Information on Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Therapies”), a significant source of information used by “alternative medicine” health professionals and often cited as evidence in substantiation at the Advertising Standards Authority, states for buchu:

Orally, buchu is used as a urinary tract disinfectant in cystitis, urethritis, prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), acute cystitis, kidney infections, and venereal disease.  In manufacturing, the oil from buchu is used to give a fruit flavor (often black currant) to foods.

NMCD states the effectiveness of buchu for any conditions: Nil known.

A review by Moolla and Viljoen, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, and published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology does not confirm any efficacy for buchu in breaking down fat, controlling appetite and burning of calories.[ii] 

2.  Green tea

Green tea is used in this ingredient at 0.56 mg per dose.
Dosages used in independent published studies vary between 270 mg to 1200 mg/day [iii] a significant difference.

NMCD points out that people use green tea for a range of conditions, e.g., to improve cognitive performance and mental alertness, stomach disorders, vomiting, diarrhoea, and headaches, as well as weight loss.
 However, the rider is that people use in attempt to lose weight but that there is no proof from many studies that it is indeed effective for weight loss. 

“Effectiveness: INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE:

Obesity. There is conflicting evidence about the effectiveness of green tea for obesity and weight loss. Preliminary clinical research shows that a specific green tea extract (AR25, Exolise) standardized to 25% epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) reduces weight in moderately obese patients (8114). However, other clinical research shows that taking a green tea extract plus caffeine does not help maintain weight following a period of weight loss (14428). A meta-analysis of clinical studies suggests that, overall, taking green tea extract 576-714 mg/day along with caffeine seems to modestly reduce body mass index (BMI), body weight, and waist circumference compared to caffeine alone. But taking green tea extract without caffeine does not seem to significantly reduce weight or waist circumference (16892).” 

A recent review [iv] (2012) published in PubMed, concluded:

Green tea preparations appear to induce a small, statistically non-significant weight loss in overweight or obese adults. Because the amount of weight loss is small, it is not likely to be clinically important. Green tea had no
significant effect on the maintenance of weight loss. Of those studies recording information on adverse events, only two identified an adverse event requiring hospitalisation. The remaining adverse events were judged to be mild to moderate.
[my emphasis]

Other authors concur that “[T]here are a considerable number of RCTs (randomized controlled studies) to suggest that green tea does reduce body weight in the short term, but this not likely to be of clinical relevance.” [v] These studies used significantly greater levels than the dose used in this product.

A recent review summed up the efficacy of green tea in weight-loss/obesity but concluding: “An evaluation of the
available evidence supports a role of green tea in weight loss; however the extent of the effects obtained is still subject to debate, and requires more objective quantification in future research.”
[vi]

There is not a single study evaluating the efficacy of green tea at or near the dose used in this product, i.e., 1.7 mg per day versus 270 mg to 1200 mg/day as used in studies. 

3.  Garcinia cambogia

Garcinia cambogia is used in this ingredient at 0.56 mg per dose, i.e., 1.7 mg per day. Dosages used traditionally and in studies vary between 1,000 mg to 5,000 mg/day, a significant difference.

NMCD states that people use Garcinia for “weight loss, rheumatism, dysentery, as a purgative, and for treating worms and parasites. In foods, garcinia is used as a condiment in Thai and Indian cuisine.” However, NMCD states that its
effectiveness evaluated in numerous studies has not been proven:

“Effectiveness:  POSSIBLY INEFFECTIVE (2014)
[Update: INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE (2018)]

Obesity. Taking garcinia fruit rind extract orally doesn’t seem to help decrease weight, satiety, fat oxidation, or energy expenditure in obese people (728,8572,11407). There is some mixed evidence that garcinia might reduce food intake while sustaining satiety, but it’s too early to recommend it for this use (8572). There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of garcinia for its other uses.” 

“The dosage in studies used, for weight loss, was an extract containing 50% hydroxycitric acid, 1000 mg three times daily has been used (728). Hydroxycitric acid, 500 mg four times daily has also been used for weight loss
(11407).” 

This Spanish review published in 2008 claimed some efficacy for Garcinia in one small study but using a large dose of 1,200 mg/day.[vii]   Other studies have utilised up to 4666.7 mg (providing 2,800 mg HCA) in three equally divided doses before meals.[viii]

However, five systematic reviews and meta-analyses and 25 additional trials evaluated for among other, Garcinia cambogia, concluded that the “. . . studies provide some encouraging data but no evidence beyond a reasonable doubt that any specific dietary supplement is effective for reducing body weight” and therefore that none of the reviewed dietary supplements can be recommended for over-the-counter use. [ix]

Similarly, a recent review evaluating, among other, Garcinia cambogia, concluded that “that many botanical species including crude extracts and isolated compounds from plants have been shown to provide potentially promising therapeutic effects including appetite control and weight loss. However, many of these crude extracts and compounds need to be further investigated to define the magnitude of the effects, optimal dosage, mechanisms of action, long term safety, and potential side effects.” [x]

This is supported by a second recent review that concluded that “[A]lthough several studies have found that the administration of G. cambogia extracts is associated with body weight and fat loss in both experimental animals and humans, we should be cautious when interpreting the results as other randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have not reported the same outcomes. Furthermore, most studies in humans have been conducted on small samples and mainly in the short term. None of them have shown whether these effects persist beyond 12 weeks of
intervention. Therefore, there is still little evidence to support the potential effectiveness and long-term benefits of G. cambogia extracts.
[xi]

Other recent reviews have come to the same conclusion [xii] and recent studies were not positive. Ten weeks of Glycine max leaves extract or Garcinia cambogia extract supplementation was shown to not promote weight-loss
 in overweight individuals. [xiii]

And significantly Herbex Attack the Fat uses 1.7 mg per day versus studies showing no benefit from 1,000 mg –
5,000mg per day!

4.Aloe ferox (Aloe)

Aloe ferox is used at 0.06 mg per dose.

Aloe ferox is used for among other, gastroduodenal ulcers, diabetes, asthma, and radiation-related mucositis, but not for weight loss. NMCD states for the effectiveness for Aloe:

POSSIBLY EFFECTIVE

Constipation. Taking aloe latex orally as a stimulant laxative seems to relieve constipation due to the cathartic effects of the anthraquinones in the aloe (4, 5, 8).

For constipation, the typical dose is 100-200 mg aloe or  50 mg aloe extract taken in the evening.

The most recent review by the South African experts, van Wyk et al, acknowledged that the most frequently cited medicinal uses were the treatment of infections and internal parasites, digestive ailments and injuries, but not for weight-loss or obesity. The dose used by Herbex appears to be negligable. [xiv]
Others have added that the gel may show promise in alleviating symptoms associated with/or prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, neurodegeneration, and diabetes. [xv]

Therefore, if Aloe ferox is used for weight-loss or “attacking the fat”, the effectiveness for this use is unproven.

Herbex/Dr Sandell claims that “Aloe ferox bitters will assist in cleansing the body. It has a strong laxative and detox effect” but the recommended dose for it to have a laxative effect is 100-200 mg aloe or 50 mg aloe extract and not 0.06 mg per dose as used in Herbex Attack the Fat. 

5.Lemon concentrate

Lemon concentrate is used at 7.9 mg per dose.

This ingredient is simply concentrated lemon juice which plays no role in weight loss at 7.9 mg – one can imagine how little this is. 1ml of water = 1,000 mg. 

C.  Conclusion

It is clear that the evidence in support of the claims of Herbex Attack the Fat being able to “attack fat”, i.e., break down fat, controls appetite, and burns calories, not only inadequately supported by numerous studies, but that the dosage used in the product simply absurd. This supports my argument that Herbex and Dr Robin Sandell, the individual who claims that there is adequate proof in support of the claims for this product, a product that will be sold to millions of consumers, is not credible and not an expert but simply a “hired gun”. Note, Dr Sandell is an unqualified registered homeopath – now retired. But the point is that these doses used are NOT homeopathic anyway. And if they were, one would still require proof. In this case, it is worse for Dr Sandell supports his arguments with monographs from the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, an excellent source of information – but ignores what the monograph states about the dose required or the efficacy for the ingredient in question! 

D.Herbex’s expert, Dr Sandell substantiated this product in response to a complaint laid with the ASA again this product’s claims.

a.)  In his submission he claimed that “[T]he herbal ingredients used in Herbex Attack The Fat (syrup), together with the clinically observed effects as documented in homeopathic and herbal literature, are as follows”, followed by a list of conditions.

Comment: This is not true. Many of the “effects” were not “clinically observed” and have no traditional, homeopathic or previous herbal use for the effects claimed. For example, Garcinia cambogia, used in Thai and Indian cuisine, and traditionally in Indian medicine to treat tumors, ulcers, hemorrhoids, diarrhea, dysentery, fever, open sores, and parasites. (National Cancer Institute (NCI)) [xvi] It is only in the last two decades that its use as a possible benefit in weight-loss became recognised based NOT on homeopathy or traditional use, but mainstream science. It is therefore that the principles of mainstream science be applied to evaluating this ingredient. And we showed you above that the claims are simply outlandish!

b.)  Dr Sandell’s claims for Herbex Attack the Fat argues among other, that “Due to the combination formulation of Herbex Attack The Fat (syrup) there is a synergistic action between the ingredients which enables them to be
used in lower doses than if they had been prescribed individually. As a result there is a therapeutic effect without side effects. This principle is also used in certain pharmaceutical medications in Western medicine and has been
extensively used in herbal medicines in Traditional Chinese Medicine, This latter practice, to the best of our knowledge, dates back for approximately 3000 years
.”

Comment:

I. Some of the ingredients in this product have NO traditional use in Chinese Medicine or a history of homeopathic use e.g., Garcinia.

II. Dr Sandell claims that “there is a synergistic action between the ingredients which enables them to be used in lower doses than if they had been prescribed individually. As a result there is a therapeutic effect without side effects”. There is no proof that this is true: not a single study has ever been published to
 confirm that this group of ingredients are synergistic or not. There is abundant evidence that demonstrates that some ingredients may be synergistic (and that the risk of side effects increases) or that they may be antagonistic. Until proof is supplied to support this contention, it is no more than an
unsubstantiated, unsupported contention.

III.More damning, Dr Sandell supports his claims with data from the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (NMCD) (as we do), but completely neglects to point out that NMCD states that there is NO efficacy demonstrated for the effects being claimed for the individual ingredient!

IV. Most importantly, the dosage of the individual ingredients used in Herbex Attack the Fat is used at an infinitesimally small amounts compared to those mentioned in NMCD based on the dosages evaluated in studies and shown to be ineffective.

For example: Dr Sandell claims efficacy for the ingredient Garcinia cambogia and supports this with data from the NMCD. An excerpt from the Respondents evaluation of Herbex Attack the Fat (see included annexure) notes the following from NMCD for Garcinia cambogia:

NMCD states that people use Garcinia for “weight loss, rheumatism, dysentery, as a purgative, and for treating worms and parasites. In foods, garcinia is used as a condiment in Thai and Indian cuisine.” However, NMCD states that its effectiveness evaluated in numerous studies has not been
proven:

“Effectiveness:  POSSIBLY INEFFECTIVE

Obesity. Taking garcinia fruit rind extract orally doesn’t seem to help decrease weight, satiety, fat oxidation, or energy expenditure in obese people (728,8572,11407). There is some mixed evidence that garcinia might reduce food intake while sustaining satiety, but it’s too early to recommend it for this use (8572). There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of garcinia for its other uses.”

“The dosage in studies used, for weight loss, was an extract containing 50% hydroxycitric acid, 1000 mg three times daily has been used (728). Hydroxycitric acid, 500 mg four times daily has also been used for weight loss (11407).”

Garcinia cambogia is used in Herbex Attack the Fat at 0.38 mg per dose, i.e., 1.2 mg per day. Dosages used traditionally and in studies vary between 1,000 mg to 5,000 mg/day, a significant difference!

(NMCD states for “POSSIBLY INEFFECTIVE” = “This product has some clinical evidence showing ineffectiveness for a specific indication; however, the evidence is limited by quantity, quality, or
contradictory findings. People should be advised NOT to take products with a “Possibly Ineffective” rating.”)

c.)  In support for the claims for the ingredient, Camellia sinensis 50% extract (Green tea), Dr Sandell evaluates the monograph in NMCD for Black tea, also known as Camellia sinensis

Comment:

There are individual monographs for Green tea (Camellia sinensis) AND Black tea (Camellia sinensis), and
 although there are overlapping aspects, NMCD differentiates the two. For example: 

Effectiveness ratings (only conditions listed and not explanatory text):

Green Tea

Black Tea

LIKELY EFFECTIVE

Genital warts.

Mental alertness.

LIKELY EFFECTIVE

Mental alertness.

POSSIBLY EFFECTIVE

Bladder cancer, esophageal cancer, and
pancreatic cancer.

Cervical dysplasia.

Hyperlipidemia.

Hypotension.

Oral leukoplakia.

Ovarian cancer.

Parkinson’s disease.

POSSIBLY EFFECTIVE

Atherosclerosis.

Hypotension.

Kidney stones (nephrolithiasis).

Myocardial infarction (MI).

Ovarian cancer.

Parkinson’s disease.

POSSIBLY INEFFECTIVE

Colorectal cancer.

POSSIBLY INEFFECTIVE

Breast cancer.

Gastrointestinal cancer. 

INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE

Breast cancer.

Cardiovascular disease.

Diabetes.

Gastric cancer.

Gingivitis.

Hypertension.

Lung cancer.

Obesity. There is conflicting evidence about
the effectiveness of green tea for obesity and weight loss. Preliminary
clinical research shows that a specific green tea extract (AR25, Exolise)
standardized to 25% epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) reduces weight in
moderately obese patients (8114). However, other clinical research shows that
taking a green tea extract plus caffeine does not help maintain weight
following a period of weight loss (14428). A meta-analysis of clinical
studies suggests that, overall, taking green tea extract 576-714 mg/day along
with caffeine seems to modestly reduce body mass index (BMI), body weight,
and waist circumference compared to caffeine alone. But taking green tea
extract without caffeine does not seem to significantly reduce weight or
waist circumference (16892).

Osteoporosis.

Prostate cancer.

Stroke.

INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE

Diabetes.

Hypertension.

Lung cancer.

Osteoporosis.

 

This really questions the competence of Dr Sandell to evaluate Herbex products. According to his assessment, he argues that NMCD supports efficacy for weight-loss/obesity for Black tea, when it is not listed (the source of his information), and if he had used the correct monograph, Green tea, the monograph would have claimed that for weight loss / obesity, there is “Insufficient Reliable Evidence To Rate”

So you be the judge. Does this product make sense to you? Could this be a scam?

And as if this is not enough evidence of Herbex nonsense / non-science, Herbex Slimmers for Men claim that a number of ingredients suppress appetite when they are in fact traditionally used as appetite stimulants (when used in the correct dose).

Considering that Herbex claims to turnover “approximately R8 473 308 over a 3 month period for this range of products, there must be some spare cash to do a study to confirm that this product works. I suspect that the Bissets know their product cannot assist “attacking fat”, hence no point on wasting any money on a study.

E.  References:

[i] Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database
http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com/home.aspx?cs=&s=ND

[ii] Moolla A, Viljoen AM. ‘Buchu’ -Agathosma betulina and Agathosma crenulata (Rutaceae):
a review. J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Oct 28;119(3):413-9. doi:
10.1016/j.jep.2008.07.036. Epub 2008 Aug 3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18725278

 [iii] Rains TM, Agarwal S, Maki KC. Antiobesity effects of green tea catechins: a mechanistic review. J Nutr Biochem. 2011 Jan;22(1):1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2010.06.006. Epub 2010 Nov 5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21115335

[iv] Jurgens TM, Whelan AM, Killian L, Doucette S, Kirk S, Foy E. Green tea for weight loss and weight maintenance in overweight or obese adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Dec 12;12:CD008650. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD008650.pub2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23235664

[v] Johnson R, Bryant S, Huntley AL. Green tea and green tea catechin extracts: an overview of the clinical evidence. Maturitas. 2012 Dec;73(4):280-7. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2012.08.008. Epub 2012 Sep 15. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22986087

[vi] Thavanesan N. The putative effects of green tea on body fat: an evaluation of the evidence and a review of the potential mechanisms. Br J Nutr. 2011 Nov;106(9):1297-309. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21810286

[vii] de Lira-García C, Souto-Gallardo M, Bacardí-Gascón M, Jiménez-Cruz A. [A systematic review of the effectiveness of alternative weight-loss products’ ingredients]. [Article in Spanish] Rev Salud Publica (Bogota). 2008 Nov-Dec;10(5):818-30. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19360230

[viii] Preuss HG, Rao CV, Garis R, Bramble JD, Ohia SE, Bagchi M, Bagchi D. An overview of the safety and efficacy of a novel, natural(-)-hydroxycitric acid extract (HCA-SX) for weight management. J Med. 2004;35(1-6):33-48. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18084863

[ix] Pittler MH, Ernst E. Dietary supplements for body-weight reduction: a systematic review. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Apr;79(4):529-36. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15051593

[x] Astell KJ, Mathai ML, Su XQ. A review on botanical species and chemical compounds with appetite suppressing properties for body weight control. Plant Foods Hum Nutr. 2013 Sep;68(3):213-21. doi: 10.1007/s11130-013-0361-1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23666454

[xi] Márquez F, Babio N, Bulló M, Salas-Salvadó J. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of hydroxycitric acid or Garcinia cambogia extracts in humans. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2012;52(7):585-94. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2010.500551. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22530711

[xii] Egras AM, Hamilton WR, Lenz TL, Monaghan MS. An evidence-based review of fat modifying supplemental weight loss products. J Obes. 2011;2011. pii: 297315. doi: 10.1155/2011/297315. Epub 2010 Aug 10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20847896

[xiii] Kim JE, Jeon SM, Park KH, Lee WS, Jeong TS, McGregor RA, Choi MS. Does Glycine max leaves or Garcinia Cambogia promote weight-loss or lower plasma cholesterol in overweight individuals: a randomized control trial. Nutr J. 2011 Sep 21;10:94. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-10-94. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21936892

[xiv] Grace OM, Simmonds MS, Smith GF, van Wyk AE. Therapeutic uses of Aloe L. (Asphodelaceae) in southern Africa. J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Oct 28;119(3):604-14. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2008.07.002. Epub 2008 Jul 16. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18682283

[xv] Loots du T, van der Westhuizen FH, Botes L. Aloe ferox leaf gel phytochemical content, antioxidant capacity, and possible health benefits. J Agric Food Chem. 2007 Aug 22;55(17):6891-6. Epub 2007 Jul 28. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17661490

[xvi] http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/htdocs/Chem_Background/ExSumPdf/GarciniaCambogiaExt_508.pdf 

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One Response to Herbex Attack the Fat – Scam?

  1. Juanita 22 February, 2017 at 8:03 am #

    I started using Herbex 2 years ago, for about 6 weeks. I used the drop, as well as the syrup. After a while the muscle in my left shoulder started burning each time I drank it. I really wanted to lose weight, so I continued until the pain got too bad. I stopped using it, and went to the doctor. He didn’t know what it was, and put me on anti-inflammatories. It didn’t help. The muscle in my left arm tore all the way from my shoulder to my wrist. I started going for lymph node drainages, which did help, and she also strapped up my arm. I have been to see a naturopath, as I realised that I have leaky gut syndrome. I have been on medication, which seems to be helping. I tried to contact Herbex, and they were adamant that there was nothing wrong with their product. The same thing happened to my friend, and she is still sitting with the torn muscle. Whatever you do, DO NOT USE HERBEX!

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