Florence Niemann – Fountainhead

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Posted 19 January 2013

As mentioned previously on CAMCheck, we do not usually identify the individual(s) responsible for the marketing/selling of unsubstantiated products. However once a company continues to ignore ASA rulings or displays clear evidence that the trust of consumers is being abused, by inter alia, continuing to promote these or similar products, then in our view it is fair that these individuals should be identified and exposed.

 Florence_Niemann Florence Niemann is the owner of Fountainhead. In spite of a number of rulings against her company’s Detox Patch products, Fountainhead continues to make nonsensical and scientific implausible claims for these products. 

In other words, a company that has at its mission statement, “Quality – Integrity – Effectiveness“, is clearly lacking integrity.


 

Significantly, not only is Florence ignoring the previous ASA rulings, but it has also been pointed out to her in the ASA complaint that “detox patches” have been ruled as scams by the USA Federal Trade Commission.

At http://www.thefountainhead.co.za/welcomenew.asp a list of products are advertised that scientifically are either nonsensical or simply baloney.

For example, it is scientifically impossible for a product to: “balance the body’s energy field”, “nurture a healthy DNA pattern”, and in particular use a “blood oxygenator” or in any other way which does not involve breathing to benefit from “dissolved oxygen”. [The exception of course is being linked up to a heart-lung machine.]

Here is a list of Fountainhead products that makes most bizarre claims.

  • Fountainhead Nutritive Body Lotion  – Contains 10% magnesium. Excellent for energy, healing, sports, pregnancy.
    Comment: Magnesium is not well absorbed through the skin.
  • Fountainhead Reflexology Mat – Stimulate reflexes a few minutes daily to enjoy benefits of reflexology.
    Comment: There is no evidence that the mat is equivalent to reflexology.
  • Fountainhead Upliftment Spray – Protects you from electromagnetic radiation and clears stagnant energy.
    Comment: What is stagnant energy!? A spray that can protect one from electomagnetic radiation? Baloney.
  • Aulterra – Neutralizies (sic) toxic chemicals and balances body’s energy field.
    Comment:  “formulated from two naturally occurring trace mineral deposits, kelp; and a proprietary homeopathic succession (sic) process.”
  • Etherium Gold – Balances Left and Right Hemispheres of the brain.
    Comment: What?!
  • Colloidal DNA Boost – Slows Cellular Degeneration. Nurtures healthy DNA pattern.
  • Oxygen Elements Plus™ – “Life Support Blood Oxygenator”: A concentration of 78 trace elements, 34 enzymes, 18 essential amino acids and dissolved oxygen – developed by Dr Everett Storey.
    Comment: This is remarkably similar to another product on the SA market called “Cellfood” – also developed by Dr Everett Storey (but Cellfood has only 17 essential amino acids). How any oxygen these drops generate travel from the intestine into cells of the body without being used up, has not yet been satisfactorily explained.
  • Oxy-Moxy™ – Blood oxygenator. Excellent for energy production, asthma, smokers, to prevent jet lag.
    Comment: A scientific explanation is needed for how putting drops under the tongue can increase oxygen in the blood!

Fountainhead CardioFlow Pomegranate Dietary Supplement makes among other, the following claims:  Lowers Cholesterol & Prevents Heart Disease, Reduces fatty deposits on artery walls, Reduces blood  pressure, Lowers Blood sugar, Reduces cell damage, Slows cartilage deterioration and osteoarthritis, May prevent the return of prostate cancer after surgery,  Promotes a healthy heart. Contrast this with the USA Federal Trade Commission who charged USA marketers of a pomegranate product for: “(a) deceptively advertised their products and (b) did not have adequate support for claims that their products were effective in preventing or treating heart disease, prostate cancer, and erectile dysfunction.” Furthermore, Florence Niemann has an ASA ruling against this product false claims in December 2009. So does Florence Niemann have “integrity”?

It should be noted that Fountainhead (and Florence?) also seem to support the widely discredited late Hulda Clark and her “zapper.” Somehow “Dr” Clark could not cure her own illness despite having written a book called “The cure for all diseases.”

Previous ASA rulings:

1)     Fountainhead Chi Detox Patches / Health Products South Africa / 3339

2)     Fountainhead Chi Detox Patches / Health Products South Africa / 3339 (Sanctions)

3)     Fountainhead Healing Bath Salts & Nutritive Lotion / HA Steinman / 14803

4)     Fountainhead Detox Patches / HA Steinman / 14684

5)     Whole Body Tonic / HA Steinman / 14800

6)     Fountainhead Detox Patches / HA Steinman / 14684

7)     Memoregain For Your Brain / HA Steinman / 14800

8.)    Cardio Flow Pomegranate / HA Steinman / 14804

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7 Responses to Florence Niemann – Fountainhead

  1. Florence Niemann 30 March, 2015 at 8:44 pm #

    I am shocked to this post as its the first time I come across it you do not send complaints openly like Hello Peter as I never received this complaint.

    Please note that I sold The Fountainhead to new owners Cairine Van Heerden and Johnathan Shelley you may contact them on Tel 011 887-7212 or 5. [email protected] [email protected]

    Please remove me from this listing and note that the ASA have never been ignored.

    thank you
    Florence Niemann
    082 xxx xxxx

    • Harris 31 March, 2015 at 9:00 am #

      @Florence
      You are missing the point: It is under your watch, (i.e., you were the owner at the time), that these false claims were being made and which resulted in these ASA rulings. You yourself were responsible for selling these scams and duping South African consumers.

      Furthermore, in spite of the ASA rulings, you continued to make these false claims. If you had not ignored the ASA rulings, sanctions would not have been imposed on you.

      Whether you are no longer involved in Fountainhead is irrelevant to this posting – CamCheck bears witness to your past.

  2. Florence 31 March, 2015 at 10:18 am #

    Dear Dr Harris,

    I’m sure that what you are doing as a “consumer activist” must come from a place of good intention. However, I too feel sincere and passionate about The Fountainhead product offerings as do the users of these products – no one is out to dupe anyone.

    The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), accordingly to the last communication I had privy to felt that they did not have the expertise to interpret the data provided to them with regard to the case and as far as I know The Fountainhead new owners are dealing with The ASA. The rulings have been upheld and if you have an issue with them then surely the recourse is to address them directly as you have in the past.

    Your quote is inaccurate “Significantly, not only is Florence ignoring the previous ASA rulings, but it has also been pointed out to her in the ASA complaint that “detox patches” have been ruled as scams by the USA Federal Trade Commission.”

    Firstly I / The Fountainhead am not ignoring any ruling as per comment above, Secondly, This is not an ASA complaint but your own complaint and interpretation. Please provide the link to the USA Federal Trade quote as previously you misquoted an article for your benefit. I stand by The Fountainhead detox patches 100% and know that they do work and have both the scientific and anecdotal proof. In a previous ASA complaint from you against HomeMark detox patches an integrative doctor presented his findings in agreement for the patches and the ASA upheld his opinion that the detox patches do work, however you continued to disagree despite the ruling and in bad faith you ridiculed him and continue to harass The Fountainhead.

    The Fountainhead has many Drs as clients who embrace complimentary and alternative products.

    This genuinely does not seem to be in the interests of good medicine or enlightening the public.

    Most Sincerely,

    Florence Niemann
    M: 082 xxx xxxx
    [email protected]

    • Harris 31 March, 2015 at 11:08 am #

      @Florence
      The ASA simply evaluates the argument of the complainant and compares it with that of the respondent, then makes a ruling. At the time of the Fountainhead rulings, the ASA were simply accepting the “I say so” from the respondent’s ‘expert’ even if it contradicted the scientific evidence. Now the precedent is that they have to compare what the expert says with the evidence.

      Your point, “The Fountainhead am not ignoring any ruling as per comment above“, should be contrasted with the sanctions that were requested – sanctions are considered when a company does not comply with the ASA ruling.

      The link to the USA Federal Trade is here: “At the request of the Federal Trade Commission, a federal judge has banned marketers of Kinoki “Detox” Foot Pads – that would purportedly remove toxins from the body through a person’s feet – from selling a wide variety of products. The FTC charged that the marketers falsely claimed the pads could treat numerous illnesses and medical conditions”, and, “The defendants falsely claimed to have scientific proof that the foot pads removed toxic materials from the body, according to the FTC complaint. The defendants also advertised that when applied to the soles of consumers’ feet at night, the food pads could remove toxins, metabolic wastes, heavy metals, and chemicals from the body”

      Contrast that with your point: “I stand by The Fountainhead detox patches 100% and know that they do work and have both the scientific and anecdotal proof.” As you know, anecdotal proof is worthless: Readers of CamCheck have sometimes claimed a product works in spite of our testing that showed that there were no active ingredients in the product.

      We are not against “complimentary and alternative products” – we are against products that claim to fit this paradigm, but actually do not, or makes claims that are false or where there is no evidence to support the claims. “Detox” foot pads is one of these.

      And your point “This genuinely does not seem to be in the interests of good medicine or enlightening the public” is false. Readers will read your comments and compare them with mine, and then make up their own minds. The fact is there is sufficient physiological evidence to confirm that this product is a scam, and certainly no scientific evidence that it works, supports the FTC action taken in 2010.

    • Harris 31 March, 2015 at 11:15 am #

      @Florence
      On another point, on MedPages.co.za you are listed as a “Therapeutic Reflexologist”. However Ms Florence Reinartz Niemann is not registered with the Allied Health Practitioners Council of South Africa (AHPCSA) as a therapeutic reflexologist as required by law. Is there a satisfactory explanation for this?

  3. Florence Niemann 31 March, 2015 at 1:24 pm #

    Dear Dr Harris,

    The Fountainhead does not sell Kinoki detox foot pads or any other Kinoki product.

    With regard to anecdotal evidence, many medicines came into being from anectodal experience without which there would be no research of active ingredients and medicine produced.

    As one example – I heard from a client who suffered from debilitating arthritis and who had been taking the anti-inflammatory medicine – the now withdrawn Vioxx who used The Fountainhead detox patches to great effect for pain relief – the difference being that the detox patches helped and did not have any side effects as the Vioxx clearly did hence the ban.

    I am satisfied with the evidence provided to me by the manufacturers KJI in terms of thermographic before and after photos, Far Infra Red measurements, anti-oxidant measurements, as well as contents of patches before and after use clearly showing as containing toxins as well as their US FDA Certification and do accept all the anectodal evidence as important too.

    I am registered as a therapeutic reflexologist and am registered with the Allied Health Professions Council Reg No A5399. Reinartz is my maiden name and the registration is under Florence Niemann my married name.

    This is my final comment, The Fountainhead now has new owners and it is not my place to continue. You clearly have an issue with me evident from your personal attacks on my integrity although I have no idea why, a more sincere person you wont meet. Whilst at The Fountainhead and even now I have a passion for health (although I no longer practice as a reflexologist) and have always wished to assist people on their journey to health as I’m sure you do but from another angle.

    Most sincerely

    Florence Reinartz Niemann
    082 xxx xxxx
    florencer[email protected]

    • Harris 31 March, 2015 at 2:51 pm #

      @Florence
      Your argument is illogical. The expert FTC scientists did not only say that Kinoki product cannot support the claims, but that DETOX Foot pads cannot support the claims. The problem here is that you have simply accepted the claims of the manufacturers without conducting due diligence to find out whether the claims are even remotely possible, i.e, reading enough around this subject to know that the claims are contrary to what we know about the skin and its ability to excrete toxins, etc., for which there is a large body of evidence for.

      Far Infra Red measurements is a scientific process but its use has been abused to support claims for some products that are simply nonsense. And if you were sincere, you would have checked the claims for the “US FDA Certification” which I demonstrated to the ASA to be a slight of hand – all the certificate showed was that the foot pads were checked to see if they contained any bacteria and other harmful substances, NOT that they were valid products NOR whether they were effective. Also, there was a question about the validity of the lab that did the testing – I could not trace them except for an address which, when I checked, was a vacant office in a building! (I phoned the business next door to it).

      I stand corrected on your registration – You are absolutely correct and your registration is current. I apologise for that error.

      Most products with anecdotal evidence never become fully fledged products, that is why anecdotal evidence is not a reliable form of evidence. For example, there have been many ‘cures’ for AIDS/HIV that turned out to be bogus.

      I want to take issue with your final point: “You clearly have an issue with me evident from your personal attacks on my integrity although I have no idea why, a more sincere person you wont meet.” The fact is simply this: you as owner of Fountainhead, sold for a number of years a range of products that had (and has) no evidence to support their claims. I cannot say whether you truly believed the claims or were fully aware that you were selling products that could be no more than scams (without any proof to support their claims (except for ‘anecdotal’ claims) they could be nothing more than a scam – in fact, detox foot pads are in fact just this, a scam). This, nor the fact that the company has been sold to others frees you of this responsibility, for, at the time of these postings, your name and actions was associated with these products.

      Even Huisgenoot/You published an article pointing out what nonsense this product is, yet you continued to market and sell this product.

      And as I pointed out in the post above: “CardioFlow Pomegranate Dietary Supplement makes among other, the following claims: Lowers Cholesterol & Prevents Heart Disease, Reduces fatty deposits on artery walls, Reduces blood pressure, Lowers Blood sugar, Reduces cell damage, Slows cartilage deterioration and osteoarthritis, May prevent the return of prostate cancer after surgery, Promotes a healthy heart. Contrast this with the USA Federal Trade Commission who charged USA marketers of a pomegranate product for: “(a) deceptively advertised their products and (b) did not have adequate support for claims that their products were effective in preventing or treating heart disease, prostate cancer, and erectile dysfunction.” Here is a recent (2015) review published in a journal that supports ‘alternative’ medicine that concludes: “Future studies need to prove the clinical benefit”.

      Can you not appreciate the harm you may have caused to consumers of your product, who, instead of seeking out a product that has proven benefit, instead, were induced to utilise a product with no proven benefit?

      You may well be sincere but that does not diminish the fact that a range of products with unproven claims were sold to the public.

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