DNA Diet – Does it work??

Posted 04 April 2012

The individuals behind the DNA diet (Dr. Daniel Meyersfeld and Yael Joffe) give what may appear to be a "convincing" argument in favour of the DNA diet. The ASA have ruled against the claims for the product. Now one of South Africa's most respected nutrition experts, Prof. Marjanne Senekal, Associate Professor; Head: Division of Human Nutrition; Department of Human Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, weighs in:

"Of note is that the combined effect on body mass index of the  single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the currently confirmed 32 loci is a modest 1.45%, bearing in mind that the estimated heritability of obesity is 40-70%. Conclusions formulated by various researchers on the translation of nutrigenetics research into personalised nutrition, including obesity prevention and management, indicate that scientists hold the opinion that more research is necessary before evidence-based practice in this area can be guaranteed.


Article abstract

Marjanne Senekal. Genotype-based personalised nutrition for obesity prevention and treatment: are we there yet? South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2012 Vol 25, No 1, pages 9-14  

"Interactions between genotype and dietary intake include genetic moderation of the effect of dietary intake on disease development (nutrigenetics). Research on nutrigenetics has focused mainly on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and supports the notion that interactions between genes, diet, other lifestyle factors, disease, and time (life cycle span), contribute to the risk of most polygenic nutritionrelated diseases. Typically, genotype-based personalised nutrition involves genotyping for a number of susceptibility SNPs associated with the prevention, or management, of a particular disease. Dietary advice is then personalised to the individual’s genotype to ensure optimal prevention or treatment outcomes. To ensure evidence-based practice, research design and methodology, applied in the investigation of relevant associations, and confirmation of causality, should be appropriate and rigorous. The process of identifying SNPs associated with disease patterns is ongoing. Of note is that the combined effect on body mass index of the SNPs at the currently confirmed 32 loci is a modest 1.45%, bearing in mind that the estimated heritability of obesity is 40-70%. Conclusions formulated by various researchers on the translation of nutrigenetics research into personalised nutrition, including obesity prevention and management, indicate that scientists hold the opinion that more research is necessary before evidence-based practice in this area can be guaranteed."

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Relates to these posings:

http://www.camcheck.co.za/category/weight-loss/dna-diet/

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