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Wondernut: ARB Ruling

Posted 28 March 2022

A consumer laid a complaint with the Advertising Regulatory Board against the claims being made for Wondernut arguing that there is no robust evidence to support the claims being made for this product.

The product claims, inter alia:

  • May Lose centimetres
  • May Improve Muscle tone, May Increase weight loss and detoxifies your system.
  • May Maintains Energy levels
  • May Enhances skin – Making it soft and shiny May increase your skin elasticity
  • Transform food into energy instead of fat

After a thorough consideration, the ARB agreed and ruled against the claims being made for this product.

Decision of the ADVERTISING REGULATORY BOARD

Complainant: Dr Harris Steinman
Advertiser: Wondernut (Pty) Ltd
Consumer/Competitor: Consumer
File reference: 1936 – Wondernut – Steinman
Outcome: Upheld

Date: 28 March 2022

The Directorate of the Advertising Regulatory Board has been called upon to consider claims made by the Advertiser for its “Wondernut Capsule” … Read the rest

Dangerous weight loss products for sale online with no health warnings

Posted 25 August 2021

Which? finds substances that can cause heart problems being sold on eBay, Wish and AliExpress

Denis Campbell Health policy editor, The Guardian

Wed 25 Aug 2021

“Dangerous” weight loss products containing substances that can induce a stroke or heart attack are being sold on websites such as eBay without any health warnings, an investigation has found.

The consumer group Which? found dozens of products on sale online containing plant extracts that can make users agitated or aggressive and increase their heart rate and blood pressure.

They all contained either yohimbine or synephrine, substances that the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has said have “considerable potential to cause harm if used without medical supervision or advice”.

Which? bought nine such products, which are used by some people seeking to lose weight, bodybuilders and gym-goers, through the online marketplaces eBay, Wish and AliExpress. Of those, two … Read the rest

Evidence lacking for “alternative” weight-loss therapies

Posted 07 July 2021

A systematic review of published research evaluating the efficacy of dietary supplements and “alternative therapies” for weight loss among people at least 18 years of age has found that supportive evidence is weak. Many clinical trials were also hampered by a significant risk of bias due to inconsistent testing methods. Problems with studies include small sample sizes, short follow-up periods, and poor study designs.
Reference: Batsis JA. A systematic review of dietary supplements and alternative therapies for weight loss. Obesity, June 23, 2021

Key findings included:

  • Out of 315 randomized controlled trials included in the review, 52 were classified as having a low risk of bias, of which 16 demonstrated significant weight changes for tested therapies compared to placebo.
  • No high-quality evidence supported acupuncture, calcium-vitamin D supplementation, chocolate/cocoa, phenylpropanolamineguar gumPhaseolus vulgarispyruvate, and mind-body interventions as weight-loss
Read the rest

Evidence for claims in weight-loss ads is slimmer than you’ll be

Posted 05 July 2021

Was Pinterest right to ban advertising for diet products on its platform?

Wendy Knowler TimesLive 04 July 2021

Pinterest has banned all weight loss ads on its platform, as part of its policy not to support body shaming advertising.

It will no longer allow ads containing testimonials about losing weight, references to body mass indexes, or those that “idealise or denigrate” certain body types.

The company is the first major tech platform to prohibit weight loss ads.

Apparently the US National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) advised Pinterest on the policy change.

“NEDA is encouraged by this necessary step in prioritising the mental health and wellbeing of Pinners, especially those affected by diet culture, body shaming and eating disorders,” said Elizabeth Thompson, interim CEO for the association, in the release.

“We are hopeful this global policy will encourage other organisations and companies to reflect on potentially harmful

Read the rest

Herbal and diet supplements ‘have no effect on weight loss’

10 May 2021

Visitors of CamCheck will be aware of my claim that Herbex is a useless product for weight-loss and my evidence for making this claim.

I have shown how Herbex uses ingredients that has not been shown to be effective for weight-loss, using them at miniscule dosages in their products. Recently Herbex has released Herbex UltraSlim, a product that has higher dosages but still no proof that the product works.

This systematic review, presented at a recent obesity congress, concludes that “Herbal and diet supplements ‘have no effect on weight loss'”.

Herbex claims that their mix of herbs does. I would rather believe evidence, of which they have zero.

Herbal and diet supplements ‘have no effect on weight loss’

Popular aids sold by £29bn industry don’t cut obesity, says Australian study

Robin McKie Sun 9 May 2021 07.15 BST

The Guardian

There is insufficient evidence to justify recommending … Read the rest

Ketovatru – Major scam – beware!

Posted 29 June 2020

Ketovatru is promoted as a weight-loss product. The company claims that Prof Tim Noakes and Dr Moll endorse this product.

The scam even appears to show Prof Noakes responding to comments – but these are lies – they are not his comments.

Neither Dr Moll nor Prof Noakes have endorsed this product, and the scam artists are using their names and photos without permission. Furthermore, there are many comments on Facebook pointing out that money was taken and no product delivered.

Beware, avoid.

Ketovatru advert

Read the rest

Evidence for weight loss herbal supplements branded ‘insufficient’

Posted 20 February 2020

A global review of herbal supplements for weight loss has concluded that although statistical differences have been observed there is ‘insufficient evidence’ to recommend any current herbal weight loss treatments…

Read further at NutraIngredients

The above article is based on the research article below:

Effectiveness of herbal medicines for weight loss: A systematic review and meta‐analysis of randomized controlled trials

First published:27 January 2020
Peer Review The peer review history for this article is available at https://publons.com/publon/10.1111/dom.13973.

Abstract

AIM:

To update the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of complementary medicines to assist in weight loss by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of herbal medicines for weight loss.

METHODS:

Four electronic databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL and

Read the rest

Science Has Shown These Five Weight Loss Supplements Are a Waste of Money

Posted 11 December 2019

By Clare Collins, Lee Ashton & Rebecca Williams

The Conversation 8 Dec 2019

When you google “weight loss” the challenge to sort fact from fiction begins.

These five supplements claim to speed up weight loss, but let’s see what the evidence says.

1. Raspberry ketones

Raspberry ketones, sold as weight loss tablets, are chemicals found in red raspberries responsible for that distinct raspberry flavour and smell. You can also make raspberry ketones in a lab.

A study in obese rats found raspberry ketones reduced their total body fat content.

In one study, 70 adults with obesity were put on a weight loss diet and exercise program, and randomised to take a supplement containing either raspberry ketones, or other supplements such as caffeine or garlic, or a placebo.

Only 45 participants completed the study. The 27 who took a supplement lost about 1.9 kilos, compared Read the rest

Wondernut: If this diet aid is dangerous, why is it still on the market?

Posted 04 May 2018

By Katharine Child Times Select

Activist puts the blame on SA’s new drugs regulator, which in turn claims it is under-resourced

Desperate to lose weight, a Joburg woman was eager to try a weight-loss pill readily available online – one that promised to be a herbal remedy. But then things took a turn for the worse for her health.

Four days after starting to use Wondernut, she started shaking all over. The woman has severe bipolar disorder but has been stable for years on a range of psychiatric medications.

“We thought she was having a ‘depressive’ episode as she was a wreck and couldn’t talk properly. This was accompanied by gastritis with nausea, vomiting, inability to eat and severe pain. She was in bed for 10 days. She stopped using the product, and is only just getting better now, physically and emotionally,” her daughter explained.

Read the rest

Wondernut, Zemiente, Nuez de la India, Indian Walnut – all the same and toxic

Posted 25 April 2018

We have pointed out a toxic nut being sold as a weight-loss product. Most of our postings are about Wondernut. However, the same nut is being sold on other websites and Facebook under different names: Zemiente (zemiente.com); Nuez de la India (nuezdelaindia.co.za); Indian Walnuts (indianwalnutsa.co.za); Leynate (indianwalnutsa.co.za); Magic Nut (magicnut.co.za); and others.

They are all the same ingredient: the nut from Aleurites Moluccanus, or closely related. They all have the same degree of toxicity.

Almost all make the same argument:

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). On the official website of the USDA there is a page specially made for Nuez de la India (Indian Walnut), This page contains information that indicates more than 50 physical and morphological characteristics of this seed, the most important being the one that indicates that:
A) Nuez de la India is NOT TOXIC
B) Nuez de la India Read the rest