Archive | Detox

Fountainhead Detox Patches – ASA breach ruling

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Posted 11 March 2012

A complaint was laid against the website of Fountainhead Detox Patches arguing that the same claims were still being made for this product. The argument was made that the product was the same but the name simply changed. The ASA ruled in favour of the respondent, i.e., Fountainhead.

However, this allows the complainant to lay a complaint with the ASA against the bizarre and nonsense claims being made for these two products,  Chi Detox Patches / Heat Detox Patches .  In  the event that Fountainhead change their website and claims, the original web page can be viewed here.

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Homemark Detox Foot Pads

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Posted 11 August 2010

I have previously posted that Homemark continues to suggest that the FDA has approved these footpads, or that they were tested in an FDA approved laboratory. I have previously posted that the FDA have categorically stated that these claims are false. The ASA has shown my letter to Homemark who have dismissed it, and the ASA, not trusting me, have been trying to get a personal response from the FDA, to no avail they inform me. Out of frustration, I tried the FDA again, and on 10 August 2010, they responded (remember, Homemark have been using these claims for years!)

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ASA ruling: Homemark pre-clearance appeal

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In a previous ruling, Homemark Pure Magic Spa / HA Steinman / 13961 (FAC), Homemark was not able to substantiate this product, and the FAC agreed that Homemark continues to abuse the ASA regulations and therefore imposed a 6 months pre-clearance on them. In other words, for every advertisement, Homemark has to submit, at their own cost, their advert and copy for checking. 

Homemark appealed, arguing among other, that they should not be held to the same regulations as other marketers. The ASA did not agree. 

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Detoxing – or flushing out your wallet?

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By Wendy Knowler January 05 2009 http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&click_id=125&art_id=vn20090105072220349C467627

We are gratefull to the author, Wendy Knowler, and Independent Newspapers, for permission to reprint this article here.

'Do you look tired, old and fat?" Well, yes, since you ask. It's early January, and I have to admit I've looked and felt better. And when I opened my TV listings magazine in search of small screen solace, I was confronted by your full-page advert for detox foot pads. That tired, old and fat line really got my attention, thanks to the thick red circle around each of these depressing words. "Just imagine all those toxins, like caffeine, nicotine, alcohol and pollution, inside your body!" the advert reads.

Apparently all I have to do is stick a pad to my feet when I go to bed, and when I wake up it will be black, and that's how I'll know that I've purged those … Read the rest

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Detox potion

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'Make-believe and outright quackery' – expert's verdict on prince's detox potion Sarah Boseley, health editor of The Guardian, wrote on Wednesday 11 March 2009:

"Britain's leading academic expert on complementary medicine (Edzard Ernst, professor of complementary medicine at Exeter University) has warned that the Duchy Herbals Detox Tincture – a food supplement, which combines artichoke and dandelion and promises to rid the body of toxins while aiding digestion – is based on notions which are 'implausible, unproven and dangerous'."

Prof. Ernst also stated: ""Nothing would be easier than to demonstrate that detox products work," Ernst said. "All one needed to do is to take a few blood samples from volunteers and test whether this or that toxin is eliminated from the body faster than normal. But where are the studies that demonstrate efficacy? They do not exist, and the reason is simple: these products have no real detoxification effects." Read … Read the rest

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Detox a waste of money

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Detox remedies are a waste of money, say scientists

Claims by multimillion pound industry queried 'Little evidence' to support makers' assertions By James Randerson, science correspondent The Guardian, Monday 5 January 2009 http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/jan/05/detox-science "The charity Sense About Science has compiled a dossier of information on claims made about 11 products including drinks, patches, diet supplements and even a "detox brush". A charity leaflet says: "The multimillion pound detox industry sells products with little evidence to support their use. These products trade on claims about the body which are often wrong." Our bodies are capable of recovering from binges on their own, the scientists argue."

This excellent article can be accessed here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/jan/05/detox-science

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ASA Ruling: Homemark Detox Footpads

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Posted 23 February 2014

Homemark claims that Detox Footpads can remove toxins from your body. They are supported by Dr Frederick Motz, who claims this is true. 

We say this is rubbish.

The USA FDA/FTC says this is rubbish.

In fact, physiology and common sense tells us this is rubbish.

See what an investigative reporter has to say: Detox Con!

See also: Kinoki Foot Pad marketers charged

Then read how the ASA ruled.

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FTC Charges Marketers of Kinoki Foot Pads

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FTC Charges Marketers of Kinoki Foot Pads With Deceptive Advertising; Seeks Funds for Consumer Redress For Release: January 28, 2009

The Federal Trade Commission has charged the marketers of Kinoki Foot Pads with deceptive advertising, including claims that use of the foot pads would remove toxins from the body; treat high blood pressure, depression, and a host of other medical conditions; and lead to weight loss.

In its complaint, the FTC charges that all the advertising claims either are false or did not have evidence to support them when they were made. The FTC seeks to bar the defendants permanently from deceptively marketing the foot pads. The FTC also asks the court to order the defendants to provide monetary redress to consumers or otherwise give up their ill-gotten gains.

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