Archive | Cosmetics

Nivea Luminous 630 – ARB Ruling

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Posted 24 June 2021

A consumer complaint was laid with the Advertising Regulatory Bureau against the advertising of Nivea “Perfect & Radiant Luminous630 Anti Dark Marks Serum”.

The complainant submitted that he contacted Nivea and asked for evidence of these “extraordinary” claims. Nivea was unwilling to provide any evidence, citing reasons of confidentiality, but assured him that “… the study was conducted in compliance with the necessary international and local standards applicable”.

The complainant therefore turned to the ARB arguing that without evidence, the claims cannot be justified.

Nivea supplied evidence.

Decision of the Advertising Regulatory Board

Complainant: Dr Harris Steinman
Advertiser: Beiersdorf Consumer Products (Pty) Ltd
Consumer/Competitor :Consumer
File reference: 1472 – Nivea Luminous 630 – Dr Harris Steinman
Outcome: Dismissed

Date: 24 June 2021

The Directorate of the Advertising Regulatory Board has been called upon to consider a consumer complaint against advertising promoting … Read the rest

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When consumer experience wildly differs from ‘market research’, apply truth serum

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Posted 17 May 2021

What test panels say about a product is often not an accurate reflection of how it is perceived and received by customers

TimesLive 16 May 2021

Remember when Unilever scrapped its traditional Sunlight dishwashing liquid bottle and replaced it with an upside-down one with a nozzle that dispensed a specific amount of the green stuff?

It was back in 2004, and I remember it well, mainly because there was huge public outcry about it – consumers hated not being able to control the amount dispensed, some said it leaked, and many complained that as it emptied it became very hard to squeeze.

The manufacturer relented and brought the old bottle back.

I mention this detergent packaging fail because Unilever said that before its launch extensive market research had revealed that South Africans absolutely loved that upside-down bottle.

Right. How many people
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Edible sunscreen – fraud?

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Posted 20 June 2018

Sunsafe RX is a product that promises “to help protect you from both UVA and UVB rays”. On its website, there are glowing user testimonials and photos of young, attractive people enjoying the weather. It’s the kind of marketing you might expect from a sunscreen brand, except that Sunsafe RX isn’t a cream or a spray – it’s a pill. 

It’s one of a number of products to be taken orally that make claims about protection from the sun – potentially heralding a new era when, instead of slathering yourself in lotion, you could swallow a pill and head to the beach.

It sounds too good to be true. According to the Federal Drug Administration (FDA), as well as Chuck Schumer, that’s because it probably is.

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You can’t use pills as a sunscreen

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Posted 24 May 2018

From ScienceAlert

You Can’t Use Pills as a Sunscreen, And Apparently The FDA Needs to Remind Us of That

By Mike McRae 24 May 2018

Owners of companies marketing ‘sun-protection’ pills have been warned by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to cease making spurious claims, or risk breaking the law.

Meanwhile the FDA also has a word of warning for the rest of us; a number of methods have been proven to reduce the risk of damage posed by the Sun’s UV radiation, and dietary supplements just aren’t one of them.

Four products have been specifically called out by the recent statement: Advanced Skin Brightening Formula by GliSODin Skin Nutrients, Sunsafe Rx by Napa Valley Bioscience, Solaricare by Pharmacy Direct, and Sunergized LLC’s Sunergetic.

It’s claimed that by taking these nutritional supplements, consumers can reduce the risks posed by UV radiation

For example, 

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Vaginas no place for wasps’ nests. No kidding

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Posted 21 May 2018

I RECENTLY came across a remarkable headline in the New York Post: “Doctors warn women against putting wasp nests in their vaginas”.

Those of us with the relevant anatomy are no doubt relieved to have been warned about this before we succumbed to the ever-present temptation to, well, put a wasp nest in our …

To be fair, the “all-natural” product being spruiked for vaginal rejuvenation does not actually contain live wasps, though it may contain remnants of larvae. The wasp nests, or oak galls, are ground up and turned into a paste for topical application.

As is so often the case with snake oil, the sites peddling this stuff use a bewildering blend of grand promises, ancient precedent and “sciency” language to support their marketing claims.

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Hair-straightening products contain potentially toxic mix

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Posted 18 May 2018

From CBC News

Women are being exposed to these chemicals weekly and sometimes even daily, without their knowledge

Hair products used primarily by black women and children contain a host of hazardous chemicals, a new study shows.
 
The findings could explain at least in part why African-American women go through puberty earlier and suffer from higher rates of asthma and reproductive diseases than other groups.
 
“The truly scary thing about this is that women are being exposed to these chemicals weekly and sometimes even daily, without their knowledge, because they assume a product is safe simply because it is on the shelf,” epidemiologist Tamarra James-Todd said after reviewing the report in Environmental Research.

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Alpecin “can actually help to reduce hair loss” – Not actually true

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Posted 10 April 2018

A a consultant trichologist submitted a complaint to the UK ASA challenging whether the claim that Alpecin Caffeine Shampoo could “help to reduce hair loss” could be substantiated.

“A regional press ad for Alpecin Caffeine C1 Shampoo stated “GERMAN ENGINEERING FOR YOUR HAIR” and “Shampoo is too small a word for it. Alpecin provides caffeine to your hair, so it can actually help to reduce hair loss. Simply apply daily and leave on for 2 minutes … to help the Caffeine Complex penetrate your hair and scalp”.”

The UK ASA concluded: “Taking into account the body of evidence as a whole, we considered that we had not seen any studies of the actual product as used by consumers on their scalp using an accurate and objective analysis of hair growth, in a well-designed and well-conducted trial. We concluded that the claim “it can actually help to Read the rest

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Essential Oils are linked to development of ‘Man Boobs’, scientists warn

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Posted 21 March 2018

Peter Dockrill 19 March 2018

Science Alert

Young boys receiving regular exposure to essential oils such as lavender or tea tree oil could be at risk of a rare condition that makes their breast tissue swell abnormally, a new study suggests. 

The findings, being presented this week, add further evidence that certain plant-derived oils contain chemicals capable of disrupting human hormones – a stark reminder that just because these extracts come from nature, they aren’t necessarily good for us.

“Our society deems essential oils as safe,” says developmental biologist J. Tyler Ramsey from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS).

“However, they possess a diverse amount of chemicals and should be used with caution because some of these chemicals are potential endocrine disruptors.”

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Nutraceuticals and skin appearance: Is there any evidence to support the claims?

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Posted 15 February 2018

“The rise of the nutraceutical market, specifically oral nutrition supplements claiming to improve skin appearance, is striking. This paper aims to examine the published scientific evidence for beneficial effects of nutraceuticals on skin appearance. An overview of skin physiology and intrinsic and extrinsic ageing is provided which underlies the potential physiological processes nutraceuticals purport to counter”.

“Current evidence for those without existing authorised claims (e.g. green tea extract, pomegranate extract, carotenoids, evening primrose oil, borage oil, fish oil, collagen and co-enzyme Q10) is reviewed, focussing primarily on evidence from randomised controlled trials where available, in relation to skin parameters including wrinkles and hydration”. 

“To date, the evidence for many ingredients in relation to skin appearance is limited, not sufficiently robust and/or inconsistent. Although there are a small number of human studies suggesting a potential benefit and some plausible biological mechanisms, much of the evidence Read the rest

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