Archive | Alternative medicine

Genesis II operators arrested and ordered to stop selling MMS

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Posted 10 September 2020

Colombian officials say they have arrested Mark Grenon and his son Joseph Grenon who are wanted in the United States on charges they illegally sold chloride dioxide-releasing “Miracle Mineral Solution” (MMS) as a miracle cure for COVID-19 and other diseases under the guise of Genesis II Church of Health and Healing. The Colombian prosecutor’s office said the Grenons were shipping their products from the beach town of Santa Marta to clients in the United States, Colombia, and Africa.
[Associated Press. Floridians who promoted bleach cocktail as a COVID-19 cure arrested in Colombia. CBC, Aug 13, 2020]

In July, Mark and his sons Jonathan, Jordan, and Joseph, all of Brandenton, Florida, were charged with conspiracy to defraud the United States; conspiracy to violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act; and criminal contempt.
[Father and sons charged in Miami federal court with selling toxic bleach
Read the rest

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TGA initiates court proceedings against Oxymed Australia and director Malcolm Hooper for alleged unlawful advertising

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Posted 08 September 2020

In March 2019, Natasha Bolognesi wrote an article for GroundUp, making the point: “But practitioners of so-called mild hyperbaric oxygen therapy (mHBOT) are fraudulently cashing in on the science that supports medically-approved HBOT”.

She also wrote: “Former chiropractor Malcolm Hooper, who owned the hyperbaric treatment clinic Oxymed Australia, is to stand trial for unsafe practice following the death of a former client who was undergoing treatment for multiple sclerosis at Hooper’s facility.”

TGA initiates court proceedings against Oxymed Australia and director Malcolm Hooper

3 September 2020

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), part of the Department of Health, has initiated proceedings in the Federal Court of Australia (Federal Court) in response to Oxymed Australia Pty Ltd and its sole director, Mr Malcolm Hooper’s alleged unlawful advertising of hyperbaric oxygen therapy chambers.

The TGA alleges the advertising promoted the devices for the treatment of serious diseases Read the rest

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Immunadue – Unhealthy claims exposed

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Posted 08 September 2020

DOCTORS AGAINST QUACKERY: ALTERNATIVE BRANDS’ UNDUE CLAIMS

3 Feb 2020 +1 more Simnikiwe Hlatshaneni simnikiweh©citizen.

Complaint to advertising regulator says Immunadue’s ad claims are false, unscientific.

Despite the strides made in legislation protecting consumers against bogus herbal miracle cures and other quackery, one can still find any number of products claiming to treat life- threatening illnesses.

Freely available online and lining the shelves of big-name pharmaceutical retailers, some of these health brands claim their products cure diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.

What irks Dr Harris Steinman, a long-time public opponent of health supplement scams, is that this industry is only getting bigger and the actions of its operators more nefarious.

Steinman, who edits quackery debunking website CAMCheck, raised the alarm on a brand which has repeatedly been on his website, its supplements supposedly being the key to warding off such ailments as arthritis.

Supplement Read the rest

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Herbalife to pay $123 million to resolve criminal charges

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Posted 02 September 2020

Multilevel marketing company Herbalife Nutrition, Ltd. has entered into a deferred prosecution agreement to resolve federal charges that it conspired over a ten-year period to bribe to Chinese officials and falsify its accounting records to promote and expand its business in China. Under the agreement, Herbalife admitted to violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and promised to pay penalties totaling more than $123 million. By 2016, Herbalife’s business in China accounted for $850 million, which was about 20% of its worldwide annual net sales.

Reference: Herbalife agrees to pay $123 million to resolve Foreign Corrupt Practices Act case. US Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York news release, Aug 28, 2020

MLM Watch has an archive of information about Herbalife collected over more than 30 years that includes regulatory actions and lawsuits against the company.

Source: Consumer Health Digest #20-34, August Read the rest

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Evidence for using bioidentical hormones found lacking

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Posted 14 July 2020

An ad hoc committee convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support the clinical utility of custom-compounded bioidentical hormone therapy (cBHT). Unlike the dozens of hormone therapy products that have been reviewed for safety and efficacy and are FDA-approved for treating symptoms resulting from natural, age-related hormone changes or other endocrine-based disorders, cBHT preparations are not required to be proven safe or effective before they are dispensed to patients. The NAS committee recommends: (a) restricting the use of cBHT preparations, (b) assessment of their difficulty to compound, and (c) additional education, oversight, and research. An estimated 26 to 33 million prescriptions for cBHT preparations cost upwards of $2 billion annually.

Reference: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Highlights: The clinical utility of compounded bioidentical hormone therapy (cBHT): A review of safety, effectiveness, and useRead the rest

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Criminal charges against promoters of MMS as COVID-19 cure

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Posted 14 July 2020

Mark Grenon, 62, and his sons, Jonathan Grenon, 34, Jordan Grenon, 26, and Joseph Grenon, 32, who allegedly marketed “Miracle Mineral Solution” (MMS), a toxic bleach, as a cure for COVID-19, have been charged with conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and criminal contempt.

Reference: Father and sons charged in Miami federal court with selling toxic bleach as fake “miracle” cure for covid-19 and violating court orders. US Attorney’s Office Southern District of Florida news release. July 8, 2020

According to the criminal complaint affidavit, the Grenons allegedly:

  • directed their customers to ingest MMS, a solution that contains sodium chlorite and water, which causes the solution to become chlorine dioxide, a powerful bleach
  • claimed that MMS can treat, prevent, and cure COVID-19
  • marketed MMS as a miracle cure-all for dozens of other serious diseases
Read the rest
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Why do some registered medical practitioners promote CAM interventions?

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Posted 27 June 2020

An opinion, published in the Friends of Science in Medicine newsletter.

Why do some doctors, equipped with a science-based degree offering so many opportunities for a satisfying  professional  career,  join  the  ranks  of  raggle-taggle  quacks and  self-proclaimed experts?  These  range  from  outright  shonks  (eg  Gwyneth  Paltrow)  to  the  sincere,  but  befuddled, followers of rigid, ancient, pre-scientific belief systems.

I offer some thoughts on what might or might not answer this question.

  1. Science is hard work
    Learning can be described as ‘shallow’, ‘deep’ or ‘strategic’. Some students manage to scrape through  their  medical  degree  without  a  genuine  understanding  of  biomedical  science.  How  else could one explain their willingness to embrace pseudo-science?
  1. ‘Transactional’ medicine is unsatisfying
    Rather  than  simply  expanding  their  concept  of  good  medical  care,  some  make  a  ‘mind-body’  connection  through pseudo-science. They don’t realise that psychological medicine is as heavily reliant on science as is
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Why SECTION27 and TAC are involved in a court case about complementary medicines

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Posted 01 June 2020

28th May 2020 Tendai Mafuma and Julia Chaskalson

Those who manufacture or sell complementary medicines often make claims about what these medicines contain and all the diseases they prevent or cure. As the public, we might assume that the claims must be true since some authority would stop the sale of these products if the claims were untrue. Unfortunately that is not something we can take for granted.

A set of regulations published in 2017 tasked the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) with regulating complementary medicines – essentially so that the public can have confidence that these products contain what they are claimed to contain and that they do what they are claimed to do. This was an important step forward for the public’s right to know and right not to be misled by quacks.

But yesterday (27 May 2020) the Pretoria High Court Read the rest

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TGA initiates court proceedings against MMS Australia and director Charles Barton for alleged unlawful advertising

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Posted 01 June 2020

29 May 2020

TGA

The Department of Health’s Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has initiated proceedings in the Federal Court of Australia in response to the alleged unlawful advertising of Miracle Mineral Supplement (also referred to as Miracle Mineral Solution) (MMS), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and other medicines by Southern Cross Directories Pty Ltd trading as MMS Australia.

The TGA recently issued MMS Australia with twelve infringement notices totalling $151,200 for alleged unlawful advertising. The TGA also informed MMS Australia that it must immediately remove all advertisements in breach of the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 (the Act), and warned that court action may be initiated if the advertisements were not removed within two days.

MMS Australia did not remove the allegedly unlawful advertising. The TGA has therefore initiated court proceedings to obtain an injunction restraining MMS Australia and its director, Charles Barton, from advertising or supplying the relevant Read the rest

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It’s time to stop giving snake oil salesmen the benefit of the doubt.

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Posted 20 May 2020

Centre for Enquiry April 13, 2020

[CamCheck does not focus on homeopathy. However, the points made in the article are appropriate for CamCheck by substituting ‘alternative medicine’ for homeopathy. Editor]

The makers of homeopathic medicine want it both ways.

  • They want their “drugs” to be treated like real medicine, to be able claim they can treat all kinds of ailments, and sell them right alongside evidence-based medicines on pharmacy shelves.
  • They also don’t want their products to be held to the same rigorous standards of safety and efficacy as real medicine. They don’t want to have to prove their stuff actually works, because, of course, they know it doesn’t.

Homeopathy is perhaps the most obviously phony form of alternative medicine, and we simply can’t assume that those who manufacture and market it are acting in good faith, any more than we assume positive intent from Read the rest

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