Author Archive | Harris

Detox potion

Continue Reading 0

'Make-believe and outright quackery' – expert's verdict on prince's detox potion Sarah Boseley, health editor of The Guardian, wrote on Wednesday 11 March 2009:

"Britain's leading academic expert on complementary medicine (Edzard Ernst, professor of complementary medicine at Exeter University) has warned that the Duchy Herbals Detox Tincture – a food supplement, which combines artichoke and dandelion and promises to rid the body of toxins while aiding digestion – is based on notions which are 'implausible, unproven and dangerous'."

Prof. Ernst also stated: ""Nothing would be easier than to demonstrate that detox products work," Ernst said. "All one needed to do is to take a few blood samples from volunteers and test whether this or that toxin is eliminated from the body faster than normal. But where are the studies that demonstrate efficacy? They do not exist, and the reason is simple: these products have no real detoxification effects." Read … Read the rest

Continue Reading 0

ASA Ruling: Arthro Joint Forte

Continue Reading 4

The radio commercial states, inter alia, “Bioter Health’s Arthro Joint Forté is a clinically proven, natural solution for the treatment of Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis and lower back pain. Its triple-action effect assists with bone and cartilage regeneration, provides pain and inflammation relief and increased flexibility.”

The ASA ruled: "In light of the above, the respondent’s claims are currently unsubstantiated and in breach of Clause 4.1 of Section II."

Read the rest
Continue Reading 4

Herbex – ASA rulings

Continue Reading

Herbex makes a range of products which claim to be either homeopathic or herbal preparations. These include:

  • Herbex Slimmers a.k.a. Herbex Original
  • Herbex Slimmers for Men
  • Herbex Slimmers for Women
  • HerbAqua
  • Herbex Nerve Tonic

We intend deconstructing each of these illustrating common threads, including one or more of the following:

  1. No evidence based proof of efficacy for the individual ingredients, or the combination thereof.
  2. Even if there was proof of efficacy for the individual ingredients, the dosage used in the product are far less than that used in the original studies for the ingredient – imagine if evidence shows that you need 200 mg of aspirin to treat a headache, and you are sold a product containing 2mg and making the same claim
  3. Uses dosages greater than homeopathic range and much less than suggested by herbal texts
  4. Contains ingredients which according to references, are actually appetite stimulants
  5. Makes claims which
Read the rest
Continue Reading

Detox a waste of money

Continue Reading 0

Detox remedies are a waste of money, say scientists

Claims by multimillion pound industry queried 'Little evidence' to support makers' assertions By James Randerson, science correspondent The Guardian, Monday 5 January 2009 http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/jan/05/detox-science "The charity Sense About Science has compiled a dossier of information on claims made about 11 products including drinks, patches, diet supplements and even a "detox brush". A charity leaflet says: "The multimillion pound detox industry sells products with little evidence to support their use. These products trade on claims about the body which are often wrong." Our bodies are capable of recovering from binges on their own, the scientists argue."

This excellent article can be accessed here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/jan/05/detox-science

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

ASA Ruling: Homemark Detox Footpads

Continue Reading 0

Posted 23 February 2014

Homemark claims that Detox Footpads can remove toxins from your body. They are supported by Dr Frederick Motz, who claims this is true. 

We say this is rubbish.

The USA FDA/FTC says this is rubbish.

In fact, physiology and common sense tells us this is rubbish.

See what an investigative reporter has to say: Detox Con!

See also: Kinoki Foot Pad marketers charged

Then read how the ASA ruled.

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

FTC Charges Marketers of Kinoki Foot Pads

Continue Reading 0

FTC Charges Marketers of Kinoki Foot Pads With Deceptive Advertising; Seeks Funds for Consumer Redress For Release: January 28, 2009

The Federal Trade Commission has charged the marketers of Kinoki Foot Pads with deceptive advertising, including claims that use of the foot pads would remove toxins from the body; treat high blood pressure, depression, and a host of other medical conditions; and lead to weight loss.

In its complaint, the FTC charges that all the advertising claims either are false or did not have evidence to support them when they were made. The FTC seeks to bar the defendants permanently from deceptively marketing the foot pads. The FTC also asks the court to order the defendants to provide monetary redress to consumers or otherwise give up their ill-gotten gains.

Read the rest
Continue Reading 0

UK ASA ruling: Ionic Bracelet

Continue Reading 1

A magazine ad, for the Ionic Bracelet, was headed "Get rid of aches and pains by wearing this incredible bracelet".

Below, text stated "Try the Ionic Bracelet and see for yourself its incredible effects. The results are amazing. . You should wear it on the left wrist, with the little balls facing downwards if you suffer from menstrual pains, tachycardia, phlebitis, varicose veins, circulatory complaints, a tendency to obesity, digestive problems or constipation … After fifteen days, you will find that your well-being has been permanently restored … rediscover the pleasure of a pain-free life".

Read the rest
Continue Reading 1