AllergoStop – no proof it works

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Posted 08 November 2013

AllergoStop is a product that claims to be an effective replacement for corticosteroids, anti-histamines and antibiotics, in that it is effective treatment “with immunoglobulins that play a dominant role at the time of the allergic reaction”. If you are going to claim that your product will reduce your need for among other, steroids, you better have good proof of this.

AllergoStop did not have. Dr Liezl Voshol-Botha of The Tygerberg Multicare Centre argued that this product is homeopathic and “the principles and practice followed at this practice are based on homeopathy, which is why one would not find any articles on conventional searches such as PubMed.” In other words, because Dr Voshol-Botha claims the product is “homeopathic”, that one does not need any proof that it works. The ASA agreed with the complainant’s argument that proof is required, (and in particular if you are going to compare yourself against a proven treatment). Furthermore, one does not become allergic to lactose as Dr Voshol-Botha claims! She also utilises “thermography (infrared imaging) for the early detection of signs of breast cancer” which is a dangerous and fairly useless form of detecting breast cancer – read more about this here.

[note note_color=”#fcfcb6″] AllergoStop / HA Steinman / 22598
Ruling of the : ASA Directorate
In the matter between:
Dr Harris Steinman Complainant(s)/Appellant(s)
Dr Liezl Voshol-Botha t/a AllergoStop Respondent [/note]

04 Nov 2013

Doctor Steinman lodged a consumer complaint against a print advertisement that was published in “Cape Town Get It” during September 2013. The advertisement is headed “Tired of cortisone, anti-histamines and antibiotics? Recurrent throat and ear infections? Asthma, sinus, eczema, hay fever and allergies?”

Directly below this, a large, bold banner reads “Allergostop is the answer!”

It then carries a body-copy explaining that the treatment protocol is based on a “German method” and that the product “… consists of treatment with immunoglobulins that play a dominant role at the time of the allergic reaction”.

It further states the following:

“The patient-specific reaction products such as allergic antibodies, auto-antibodies and enzymes responsible for the allergic reaction are changed by the serum activator and then returned to the patient’s body where these reactions products will be recognised as foreign, and specific counter-actions can therefore take place (anti-antibody reactions)”,

“Allergostop is recommended to both exogenous allergies (such as gluten, lactose, house dust mites, pollens, dairy and animal hairs, etc.) as well as endogenous anti-immune anti-bodies. There are two methods of administration of Allergostop i.e. sub-cutaneous injections or oral drops”.

COMPLAINT

The complainant submitted that the claims made are false and unsubstantiated. He has searched PubMed, which comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature, and was unable to find any evidence to support the advertising claims.

The complainant added that another website (www.allergyclinic.co.za) states “Allergostop is a new and as yet unproven allergy treatment which has taken off in South Africa but has never been proven to be of benefit and the explanation of how it works makes no physiological sense (Personal communication Prof P Potter)”. He explained that the “Prof Potter” referred to in this quotation is the head of allergy at Groote Schuur hospital and the University of Cape Town Medical School.

RELEVANT CLAUSE OF THE CODE OF ADVERTISING PRACTICE

In light of the complaint Clause 4.1 of Section II (Substantiation) of the Code was taken into account.

RESPONSE

The respondent submitted that there was a typing error, and that the bold claim should have read “Allergo may be the answer” as oppose to “is the answer.” The article merely explains how allergies are treated at her practice and most of the information is taken from the manufacturer’s website.

The principles and practice followed at this practice are based on homeopathy, which is why one would not find any articles on conventional searches such as PubMed.

During consultation, the procedure is explained to patients according to the scope of practice and it remains the patient’s choice whether they want to use it. It tendered a list of contact details of some patients that were treated successfully with the product if the ASA were interested.

ASA DIRECTORATE RULING

The ASA Directorate considered all the relevant documentation submitted by the respective parties.

While the Directorate notes the respondent’s undertaking to change the bold statement from “Allergostop is the answer!” to “Allergostop may be the answer!”, it is not convinced that this would address the concerns raised, as it does little (if anything) to change the overall tone and message of the advertisement.

The overwhelming impression is that this product would be beneficial in instances where cortisone, anti-histamines and antibiotics are not, or are not desired by the patient. The advertisement lists specific conditions such as “Asthma, sinus, eczema, hay fever and allergies” and explains how using the product would produce an “anti-antibody reaction”. In addition, it pertinently states that this product is “recommended to both exogenous … as well as endogenous anti-immune anti-bodies …”

It is therefore clear that the overall message is that this product will work. The respondent is correct in stating that not all medicine is effective 100% of the time in all patients, but this is not the point currently. The question still arises whether the respondent has any evidence to support the notion that this product is beneficial (or even that it “may” be beneficial).

The proposed undertaking to change “is the answer!” to “may be the answer!” is therefore rejected, as it will not address the concerns raised. The Directorate is therefore obliged to consider the advertising and determine whether or not it contravenes the provisions of Clause 4.1 of Section II of the Code.

Clause 4.1 of Section II states, inter alia, that an advertiser must hold documentary evidence to support all claims that are capable of objective substantiation. In addition, it clarifies that such documentary evidence shall emanate from or be evaluated by an independent and credible expert in the particular field to which the claims relate.

The respondent’s claims are clearly capable of objective verification as outlined in the provisions of Clause 4.1 of Section II of the Code.

However, aside from submitting a brief explanation on the theory of countersensitisation, the respondent has submitted nothing to show that this product has ever even been tested.

It is specifically noted that the Code places the onus of proof at the respondent’s door. Accordingly, the respondent bears the responsibility of proving that its claims are valid and true. The Directorate requires unequivocal confirmation from an independent and credible expert in the relevant field (allergies and related treatments) to support the exact claims made in the advertising. Such unequivocal verification should apply specifically to the respondent’s product as sold to customers.

There is currently nothing before the Directorate to show that the product is able to (or even that it “may” be able to) deliver on the efficacy claims made.

As a result, the advertising is currently unsubstantiated and in contravention of Clause 4.1 of Section II of the Code.

As a result of the above finding:

The advertising and relevant claims must be withdrawn in its current format;
The process of withdrawing the advertising and relevant claims must be actioned with immediate effect;
The process of withdrawing the advertising and relevant claims must be completed within the deadlines stipulated by Clause 15.3 of the Procedural Guide, and
The advertising and relevant claims may not be used again in its current format in future until the respondent has submitted adequate substantiation in accordance with Clause 4.1 of Section II of the Code, which is accepted by means of a new Directorate ruling.
The complaint is upheld.

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32 Responses to AllergoStop – no proof it works

  1. Steyn Marais 4 December, 2013 at 12:10 am #

    I used Allergostop for the full 5 weeks. After 1 week I phoned dr Botha to tell her that the right hand side of my face is numb. She said it is normal. After about 2 months I now find out I had a mild str0ke. My face is still numb, as well as my right hand. Please help

  2. Harris 4 December, 2013 at 8:34 am #

    @Steyn
    I am so sorry to hear about what has happened to you. I am not an expert on neurology (strokes). It is important that you see a specialist who will be able to give you more help, confirm whether this was a stroke, see if your blood pressure is normal, and check other factors that can cause strokes. If you feel that Dr Botha was negligent, you can report her to the Allied Health Professions Council. Their contact details are here: http://www.ahpcsa.co.za/contact.htm

  3. Dr. Voshol-Botha 4 December, 2013 at 1:26 pm #

    Dear Mr. Steyn Marais, I am so sorry to hear that you have suffered a stroke. As per our telephonic discussion ( 1 week after the start of Allergostop), I have stated that numbness of the fingertips and the face have never been reported with the use of Allergostop. Also, the needles that are used to administer the Allergostop is a sub-cutaneous injection with small insulin syringes at the site of the elbow and can not cause numbness of the fingers or face. I have however said that a slight aggravation of existing symptoms may occur such as temporary worsening of the post nasal drip, sneezing, sinus headaches (facial pain in the frontal sinus), but not numbness. I have discussed this with you in our first consultation as well. I have never said that “it is normal” to experience numbness. Please correct your statement above. I have also referred you to a chiropractor to find the possible cause of the numbness. I pray for a speedy recovery and trust that your neurologist will soon find the cause of the stroke and that you will also keep me updated on your progress. Kind regards Dr. Voshol-Botha

  4. Tino 7 October, 2014 at 12:22 pm #

    Hi Dr. Botha

    If I am reading correctly you state that symptoms such as sinuses and allergies will increase when you start using this product? I started with the oral administration treatment, and since using it my sinuses and allergies are probally the worst it has been in years. Don’t get me wrong, I just want to find out if the treatment will cause this in the beginning and then stop or get better as the treatment goes on

    Tino

  5. Harris 7 October, 2014 at 3:34 pm #

    @Tino
    There is not a shred of evidence that this product works. I am not suprised that you are not feeling any better.

  6. Tino 8 October, 2014 at 11:23 am #

    Hi Harris

    Problem is that I am actually feeling far worse since I am on the program, thus the question is; is it because it is actually doing what it is suppose to do, a sort of a vaccination period, or is it a horrible side effect. Also I cannot find any testimonies for people that allready did the program, I just seem to find stuff from the people supplying the stuff. Maybe you can refer me to people that used the stuff, as their is two sides of the issue, a group of people claiming it works and a group that claims it doesn’t work, I need more “prove” to benchmark my decision to carry on or leave it completely.

    Cheers
    Tino

    • Harris 8 October, 2014 at 12:06 pm #

      @Tino
      I unfortunately am unable to refer you to anyone who has used this product. However, I do believe that before one uses ANY product, whether a CAM or Big Pharma product, that it is for the company to supply unbiased, independent evidence that the product works, and how well, and whether it is safe, etc. There is zero evidence for this product, and understanding the physiology of allergy, the claims make no sense either. Until the company supplies robust evidence to support their claims, it could be that they are simply selling you a product that contains only water, for all we know. The problem with one person saying that it works, or another saying that it does not, is that these will only be anecdotal responses and influenced by many factors: hence requesting proper independent proof – for which there is zero.

  7. Adele 13 October, 2014 at 5:19 pm #

    Allergostop DOES work!

    I was appalled to stumble upon such negativity linked to Allergostop when Allergostop is quite probably the only allergy treatment that actually works!

    I suffered from severe eczema and allergies for numerous years. I saw dermatologists and doctors and was offered no solution other than cortisone and anti-histamines – neither of which are a long term solution. I was desperate. I struggled to leave the house because of what my face and hands looked like.

    I was referred to Dr Voshol-Botha by one of her patient’s who had successfully completed a course of Allergostop oral drops and was enjoying a marked reduction of their allergic symptoms.
    Dr Voshol- Botha was extremely professional at all times and explained the treatment to me in detail. After just a few days of taking Allergostop, my eczema started to approve. Because of the severity of my symptoms, it was necessary for me to repeat the course of Allergostop sub-cutaneous injections – something which Dr Voshol-Botha had explained to me before the onset of treatment.

    After the second course of Allergostop, I was symptom free and I have been for the past 4 years!! I have absolutely no eczema on any part of my body. Is Allergostop a cure YES! I have never said that about any other treatment, but for me personally, Allergostop is a cure.

    I have subsequently referred numerous people to Dr Voshol-Botha, all of whom have had excellent results.

    There are so many treatments that promise success with allergies but this is the only treatment that delivers what it promises. I will continue to recommend Allergostop to anyone I encounter who is suffering from allergies. Unless you yourself have had a severe allergy, you might not fully understand how debilitating it can be. Surely it’s our responsibility to share the good news that Allergo stop does work???

    I hold Dr Voshol-Botha in extremely high regard. She is dedicated to her profession and committed to her patients and she has successfully treated me, my family and friends for numerous ailments.

    Anyone who is suffering from an allergy..anyone who can’t focus because of severe hay fever, or incessant itching…anyone who has lost confidence because their face is covered in red eczema weals…try Allergostop.

    For me Allergostop IS the answer!

    • Harris 13 October, 2014 at 8:49 pm #

      @Adele
      Is it not strange that I and my colleagues, who work “full-time” with allergic patients, have not had success stories with this treatment? Secondly, if this treatment is so successful, why is there no studies to confirm this?

      • Harris 14 October, 2014 at 7:49 am #

        @Tino (and Adele)
        In response to your last comment “Chris, where do work, you stated that you work with allergic patients full time”, I will assume that you are referring actually to me.
        My field of expertise is in allergy having worked for years in this area. My colleagues work at the Red Cross Children’s Hospital Allergy Clinic, Groote Schuur Hospital and other allergy centres. I also regularly attend the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology annual meetings where everything under the sun, allergy related, is presented, discussed and debated. There has been no evidence supplied to confirm that this product works.

        There are individuals who will argue in defense of AllergoStop, claiming that we are controlled by Big Pharma and that is why we do not support this product. Nonsense. I will use ANY product that has evidence that it is beneficial to my patients, and I can say the same for my colleagues.

    • Debbie Van Dyk 19 April, 2020 at 11:34 pm #

      Hi All

      I am a desperate mom of a 4 year old,
      We reside on a farm and he had unfortunately got all dad’s BAD allergies, we went for intense bloodtests when he was just over 2,he was ons chronic medicine eversince, but got regular upper airway infection and tonsilitis,
      We went to Dr AJ Ford in Pretoria, and we started with the Allergo stop,

      My question is the same than @Tino, we are now on bottle 3 and he has sever tonsillitis, worst he has ever had it, i went to multiple drs he does not have enlarged tonsils, ao a tonsillectomy is not the answer.

      My question: Does the serum make the symptoms worst??????
      If so is this a sign that it is working????

      And is he allowed to use antibiotics to get the tonsillitis away?

      I have honestly appreciated this page!!!!

      • Harris 20 April, 2020 at 8:17 am #

        @Debbie
        There is no evidence that this product has any benefit. At worse, it does exactly what you are experiencing – using an ineffective treatment and continuing to be frustrated because your child is not improving, hence delaying better treatment.

        If your child has tonsillitis, it may be due to a virus or a bacteria. If a virus, he will improve on his own and there is no effective treatment for this, unfortunately. However if bacterial, he will need an antibiotic. The right antibiotic is very effective. Generally if he has occasional tonsillitis, that is normal with growing up. However if he has frequent tonsillitis, then it is sometimes recommended to remove the tonsils even if they are not enlarged.

        Right now, one has to consider that he has a bacterial tonsillitis, especially if he has high fevers. In that case, I recommend he see a doctor who can visually look at the tonsils and decide whether an antibiotic is required.

  8. Tino 14 October, 2014 at 7:36 am #

    Adele

    Let’s get one thing straight, asking a very valid concern regarding the use of Allergostop is not negativity, it’s called debate. And to be honest, this very debate is the only one I could find on the entire web, which is a bit scary. Back to business, please read my concern again, but very slowly and try to keep calm. since I started with the treatment my allergy symptoms’ severity increased dramatically. Now any person with chronic sinuses will attest that this condition is really really not nice. I stopped after one week, and things went back to normal, which indicates that there is a definite link between the two (symptoms severity and allergostop treatment). ALL I want to know, is this normal, are there people who experienced the same reaction to the treatment and did it actually helped at the end. I want to know is it worth my while to go through all this with no results. Nowhere on the entire web to I find feedbacks and testimonies of people that underwent the treatment. Also remembered as Chris indicated no studies were conducted to at least find out what the side effects are, which could shed some light on my concerns and questions. It is wonderfull that the treatment cured you from eczema, as it is a nasty condition. However, it may be that it works for certain people, but on other people it is actually a waste of time, or even dangerous, and a holistic approach must be taken to determine the effects on people. So please, refer to my concern, and if you know if someone that experienced the same side effects please assist me in contacting this person to hear what he/she has to say.
    Chris, where do work, you stated that you work with allergic patients full time.

    Cheers everybody, let’s hope for a robust debate on Allergostop!

  9. Tino 14 October, 2014 at 7:58 am #

    Thanks Chris

    Do you know if Allergostop is patented? And do you know if there is any breakthrough treatment for allergies in the pipeline? ( one that is being clinically tested ) as you probally deduced from my posts I am really suffering from sinuses, which is affecting every part of my life. I also stay in Pretoria, but is considering to move to dry desert climate like Swakopmund.

    • Harris 14 October, 2014 at 3:27 pm #

      @Tino
      I do not know if AllergoStop is patented, but even if, many patents never work and were patented simply on the argument being a novel concept. It appears to be only used by homeopaths and “allied professionals” and not mainstream medicine. Furthermore, there is very little information on the Internet about this product or the company that makes it, which could be taken as warning bells. There is another product on the market also called AllergoStop, but has a very different ingredient (cromolyn sodium) in it – and is not injected.

      According to one site:
      “AllergoStop® consists of treatment with the antibodies that are playing a dominant role in the body at the time of an allergic reaction. It is based on the method of Counter-sensitization which combines the advantages of desensitization and autohemotherapy. Countersensitisation is a unique method of treatment. It differs from conventional therapy in that it is capable of suppressing antibodies in allergies by transforming the body’s own antibodies into antigens.”
      This is pseudoscientific nonsense (if one has studied how the immune system works and knows that this claim is frankly, bullsh_t).

  10. Adele 14 October, 2014 at 8:29 am #

    @Harris

    I am not a doctor. I am a patient – I patient who is now eczema free thanks to Allergostop and Dr Voshol-Botha. I can only speak from my personal experience and the experience of my friends and the people I have referred to Dr Voshol-Botha. I would strongly suggest that you further research Allergostop because in my humble opinion, it has been a miraculous solution to a terrible problem

    • Harris 14 October, 2014 at 3:16 pm #

      @Adele
      I do not contradict your positive experience. It may be simply a placebo response, or a real response that is useful only in a handful of people. However, I as a health professional would have liked to know whether this was only a placebo response, or if real, that the product helps 5%, or 10% or 90% of users. Would it not be unfair to sell a product when you do not know whether it helps some people, many people or the majority of people? Until one sees proper evidence, one cannot say. But most importantly, the physiology of the allergy response is well researched and well established, and the claims for this product simply do not make sense, therefore one could ask that for extraordinary claims, extraordinary evidence is required.

      • Adele 14 October, 2014 at 3:49 pm #

        @ Harris

        Thank you for acknowledging that my experience of Allergostop has been positive. To suggest that my cure was a placebo response is quite a stretch. I find it strange that I didn’t experience a placebo response to the countless other treatments that I tried prior to Allergostop?

        The physiology of the allergy response may be well researched, but do doctors offer any real solutions to allergic patients? Prior to seeing Dr Voshol-Botha, I sought out the help of numerous allopathic and homeopathic doctors and nobody was able to provide me with a solution to my eczema. Yes cortisone stopped the itching, but I am sure we all agree that cortisone isn’t a solution?

        I had an extreme case of eczema which was impacting on my quality of life. Should I have waited for ‘proper’ evidence on the efficacy of Allergostop? For me that wasn’t a valid choice.

        I truly hope that people who are struggling with allergies will try Allergostop. I am passionate about this subject because I know how debilitating it is to suffer from severe allergies.

        • Harris 14 October, 2014 at 4:10 pm #

          @Adele
          I am passionate about this subject because I know how debilitating it is to suffer from severe allergies and to be sold a scam.
          Does this product work? Maybe, maybe not, but I want proper evidence to confirm that it works. Let us assume that it does work for, say 5% of users, would it be fair to advertise that it works in general for people with allergies. The truth is we do not have any evidence to know whether all or only a handful of users will benefit from this product. It may be only a scam, it may not be. It is not for me to prove it does not work, but the person selling it to show that it does.

          • Adele 14 October, 2014 at 4:36 pm #

            What I do know for sure is that Allergostop is not a scam. My cure is testament to that.
            Does it work for everyone? I don’t know that answer, but I do know of a good number of people who have used Allergostop and enjoyed positive results. This might not constitute a scientific study, but it’s good enough for me.
            I have seen (and tried) many treatments that have been advertised to cure allergies. I believe that the responsibility lies on the consumer/patient to make decisions based on their particular set of circumstances.

            I must add that it’s wonderful that you invest so much time and energy in the field of allergy. Thank you for that.

            • Harris 14 October, 2014 at 4:48 pm #

              @Adele
              If you are better, great!
              However your post reminds me of the positive testimonials that I received for my claim that Slimbetti Slender Gel works for weight-loss. Pity I knew from testing the product that it contained no hoodia as claimed! Same for Celltone which users claimed helped them but when the company submitted the results of their own study to the ASA, it showed actually that it did not work! Same for Bioslim, and many other products, with glowing testimonials, till we analysed the product and found it had no active ingredients.

  11. Adele 14 October, 2014 at 8:39 am #

    @ Tino

    My apologies, my comment regarding negativity was not directed to you in any way. I do however feel that the efficacy of Allergostop could have been debated in a more constructive manner on this website. I can well imagine your frustration if your symptoms have intensified. Personally I would recommend that you persevere based on my incredible success with the treatment.
    Best of luck!

  12. Harris 14 October, 2014 at 3:46 pm #

    This response from Dr Liezl Voshol, was posted to me instead of this posting. I am posting her full unedited reply here.

    Frankly I do not believe her claim that “56 000 patients [were treated] with this product” by a single doctor. This would be 280 patients a day for one year, or 28 patients per day for 10 years. And considering that this product has not been around for 10 years (to my knowledge), and the doctor never published his results, makes simply no sense. For us to believe Dr Voshol, I would actually want to know who this doctor is so that I can check for myself. Furthermore, one does not need a great deal of money to do an honest, good study. There is not a single published study on this product.

    ==========
    Hi Tino,

    What you are probably experiencing is a healing crisis. I have seen this MANY times in the years that I have been practicing. (Not only during Allergostop, but also in other treatments, especially in homeopathy). I have had testimonials on my website, but had to reconstruct the entire website. It will soon be up and running again. I would also love to give you details of patients whom has used Allergostop and experienced a healing crisis as well. However, I cant publish their contact details on a website/blog. I suggest you email me your detail so I can forward you some contact details of patients (with their permission) who may be able to assist you. Allergostop is based on autohemotherapy and auto sanguineous therapy. You can read more about this as well if you please. I also suggest that you contact your treating physician for some of his/her contact details as well.

    I have never came across Allergostop in my years of study etc. Only when I did my internship and worked with a doctor who’s practice is based on allergostop and treating patients with great success that I came across this amazing therapy. He has to date treated well over 56 000 patients with this product. I have seen great success. That is why I am using it in my practice. I may add that this doctor has never advertised the product, but the patients came to him via word of mouth (some clients would fly from various destinations to get this treatment).

    The manufacturing company is a small German based company and is not a huge pharmaceutical company with millions of dollars/euros to fund clinical trials. (I hope that it will be the case in future). By saying this, I am not using this as an excuse for no studies on the product, but I will continue suggesting this to my patients as 56 000 patients and counting is enough evidence for me. Patients that start allergostop do so for a reason….usually because they don’t get results with the current treatment regime they were prescribed (and has been changed a couple of times). Many of these medications that did not yield satisfactory results, had clinical trials the length of my arm.

    Whether or not you would like to continue is totally up to you. I have also used allergostop myself in 2006 for severe sinus. Once I started, I had such bad post nasal drip, it was so thick and nauseating at times and also “lost my voice” for a day as the mucus draining was so thick. This usually happens around bottle 2 and 3 and will subside as you progress. It depends whether or not you are using the drops or injections, but you can reduce the dosage and the symptoms will be less. That is why I suggested that you contact your treating physician as he/she will be able to help you with this. You can also take your normal anti-histamines during the aggravation if this will help you.

    I truly hope that funding will one day be available for double blind clinical trials. As a suggestion, why don’t you contact the manufacturing company directly and raise your concerns there as well? I am sure that they will also be able to shed some light for you.

  13. Harris 14 October, 2014 at 4:04 pm #

    A second posting by Dr Liezl Voshol

    She claims that “Karl Georg Theurer qualified as a medical doctor in 1978” and “the company has been in existence for 60 years”. This makes no sense. Either they are not related, i.e., the company started 60 years ago, and not related, Theurer qualified in 1978″. She also states “founder and researcher is a qualified medical doctor and not a “fly by night’ con artist.” Many qualified doctors become scam artists. He may be one, or maybe not. Certainly I can say this with certainty, if he is so highly respected, why is he unknown by the allergy community? Why is this ‘miracle’ product not widely used?

    My research shows that Dr Theurer appears to have first proposed his ideas as far back as 1955. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Theurer%20K). Seems like no-one believed him for there is no further research on his ideas since? Here is the website: http://www.vitorgan.de/ The site promotes homeopathic products. Read for yourself, and make up your own mind.

    =====
    Dr Liezl Voshol writes:

    An abstract from the manufacturers website: “The vitOrgan pharmaceutical group is a medium-sized, family-run enterprise. Its founder, Dr Karl Eugen Theurer, was always ahead of his time – an ambitious pioneer inspired by an inquiring mind and heart, putting his ideas into practice with unshakable courage and conviction. His will and spirit have left their mark on the company until today. The vitOrgan therapy he developed makes use of natural regulatory and metabolically active organic substances which serve to stabilise the processes which have become imbalanced by disease.
    All this is founded upon the principle of awakening the power of the cells.

    Karl Georg Theurer qualified as a medical doctor in 1978 and went on to complete further studies in general surgery, amongst others at the University Hospital of Bonn. His early medical interests were immunotherapy and transplantation immunology. He has worked at the Institute for Histology at Hanover Medical School, Germany, under Prof. von Mayersbach, and at the Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York under Prof. Oettgen. He is a specialist for biomolecular therapy and autologous immunotherapy at the vitOrgan pharmaceutical group.
    Since August 2007, Dr Karl Georg Theurer has been the appointed qualified person as required by Section 14 of the German Medicines Act.”

    As you can see the founder and researcher is a qualified medical doctor and not a “fly by night’ con artist. The company has been in existence for 60 years. I think that if it was placebo or pseudoscience, the company would have closed down a long time ago. I think its excellent for a small family owned company without millions of dollars.

  14. Mags 14 October, 2014 at 4:34 pm #

    I have used Allergostop as a patient of Dr Liezl Voshol.
    When I began the treatment, I was unable to open my hands fully, as the eczema was so bad, it would crack and bleed. I also had eczema on my face and neck. I felt like a leper.
    Allergostop worked 100% for me and Dr Voshol was an attentive and professional practitioner, who I would highly recommend.
    When Dr Voshol’s website is back up and running again, mine will be some of the before and after pictures you will see.

  15. Tino 15 October, 2014 at 8:43 am #

    Hi all

    Seems we are having a robust debate regarding Allergostop

    Harris, it does seems that there is two Allergostops on the market…what the hell!!?? Maybe Dr Botha can shed some light on this, is it the same product? My physician is a Dr Brand in Pretoria (menlyn), maybe she knows the doctor. Just to make things clear to everyone, the reason I didn’t contact Dr. Brand is because I want to hear it from people who actually used the product what the results and side effects were.
    Dr Botha, the claim is that the treatment has no side effects, but then you state that I am probally experiencing a healing crisis, isn’t this a side effect in itself? It is all very confusing, and being a engineer myself that works with cold hard facts etc I tend to lean to Harris’ point of view, prove it or don’t make the claims. Maybe if you can send me your general contact details like an e-mail I can correspond with you directly on more private matters pertaining the treatment, but I would like to include Harris in this correspondence as a third party reviewer (if he agrees).
    Overall I believe this debate is much needed, and it is wonderfull to hear some people were cured from very nasty stuff, but if they could please include any side effects that occur during the treatment or after the treatment it would be great. After all, whether the product works for people or not, it’s up to us to decide to use or not, but we need quality information to help us decide.

    Cheers all

    Tino

  16. Emma 9 November, 2014 at 12:55 am #

    Allergostop worked miracles for me.

    Having suffered from various allergy related problems since birth, I found myself still riddled with eczema in my twenties. I landed up trying Allergostop out of sheer desperation, roughly ten years ago, after following-up on a consultant that a fellow eczema sufferer had recommended. I had depression and insomnia as a result of the constant itching and stress that the eczema brought with it. My skin cleared COMPLETELY with the Allergostop treatment (my back, face and neck had been covered and I had ongoing secondary infections). My overall health/quality of life improved DRAMATICALLY as a result. My heart goes out to all those sufferers who are still being told to slather on cortisone and moisturise with emollients with no relief – neither of these avenues provided any real/long term solution for me.

    My skin was crystal clear for a long time after the Allergostop treatment and then after relocating to the the UK, I had one or two minor bouts of eczema on my back, but nothing compared to what I have experienced before. It is my understanding the the treatment only protects against allergens that you are responding to at the time of treatment and so it may need to be repeated if your environment/diet changes. Allergostop helped me so very much and I cannot be thankful enough that I stumbled upon it! I sincerely hope that it can do the same for others.

  17. Colin 17 December, 2016 at 8:43 pm #

    I started on Allergostop about 2 days ago and my sinus / post-nasal drip seems to be getting worse. I intend to stop use, because my condition (with sleep paralysis) caused me to suffocate about 2 weeks ago. I think sleep paralysis with a blocked nose is dangerous, so i’m reverting to nasal spray, seeing that the Allergostop thus far has rather aggravated the blocked nose, than relieved it.

  18. Ryan 2 February, 2017 at 1:49 pm #

    Hi All
    I thought I would add my two cents worth.
    I’ve had a chronic headache for 7 years and after much investigation have concluded that it is sinus related. (won’t go into all the detail) Still no closer to what the actual cause is and it was suspected that allergies might be the issue.
    I heard of the AllergoStop treatment working well for a friend’s young child with severe eczema so thought I might as well try this as I’ve tried everything else.
    Also being an Engineer and being a total Homeo-sceptic, I was not convinced that it could. I met with a Dr Alby Ford in Pretoria and after he explained how it was supposed to work I kind of though the reasoning made sense. So if my headache is caused by sinus issues caused ultimately by allergies, then a generic ‘fix all’ allergy solution sounds like a good plan!
    He looked into my eyes (Iridology) and said that yes, it appears that my sinuses are the issue. (again, Im convinced this is total hocus-pocus)

    I started and completed the ‘treatment’ with absolutely no positive effect on the headache whatsoever. So, I have concluded that If the AllergoStop treatment worked, I should have no allergies now if I had any before. If my headache is sinus related, and the treatment cured any allergies, these were not the cause anyway so I’m no better off!

    An obvious way to prove efficacy:
    Take known and tested allergy sufferers (a large number), let them do the treatment, test afterwards for the allergy they had before. Simple.
    This approach is used in ‘conventional’ medicine testing, why cant this be done for any other treatment homeopathic or otherwise.

    Regards

  19. Tienie 11 June, 2017 at 11:42 am #

    Hi all

    Yes, interesting viewpoints indeed and all valid, I dare say.

    I tried this product also (sinus and acne problems – 49 years old) and developed Ulcerative Colitis 7 months later ! I’m pretty sure my auto immune system is no buggered up by this product’s use. The sinus and acne issues are still present.

    Cheers

  20. Yusuf 22 February, 2018 at 11:45 am #

    Hi there

    I went on the AllergoStop treatment with Dr. Ford. I had puffiness under my eyes. The condition got worse and my face broke out into eczema. It was meant to get better but almost a year later it is still the same and I look worse off now than before I started treatment. IT DOES NOT WORK for everyone. Please be careful!

    Cheers

  21. Lakes 18 April, 2018 at 1:14 pm #

    I am now so skeptical about taking my 12 year old for sinus problems.
    This is scary and I wish Dr’s would be upfront with people instead of trying to make a quick buck on sick people who desperately need their help.

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