FDA warns consumers to avoid HCG weight-loss products

Posted 30 July 2020

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is advising consumers to avoid human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) weight-loss products. These products are typically sold in the form of oral drops, pellets and sprays, and can be found online, at weight loss clinics and in some retail stores. Claims that HCG can “reset your metabolism” and change abnormal eating patterns are unsubstantiated. HCG is a hormone produced by the placenta during pregnancy. The FDA has approved HCG as a prescription drug for the treatment of female infertility and for other medical conditions, but not for weight loss and not for use without a prescription for any purpose. Marketing of HCG for weight loss is typically accompanied by the recommendation to limit calorie intake to 500 per day, which is dangerous.

Avoid dangerous HCG products. FDA consumer update, July 13, 2020

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Evidence for using bioidentical hormones found lacking

Posted 14 July 2020

An ad hoc committee convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support the clinical utility of custom-compounded bioidentical hormone therapy (cBHT). Unlike the dozens of hormone therapy products that have been reviewed for safety and efficacy and are FDA-approved for treating symptoms resulting from natural, age-related hormone changes or other endocrine-based disorders, cBHT preparations are not required to be proven safe or effective before they are dispensed to patients. The NAS committee recommends: (a) restricting the use of cBHT preparations, (b) assessment of their difficulty to compound, and (c) additional education, oversight, and research. An estimated 26 to 33 million prescriptions for cBHT preparations cost upwards of $2 billion annually.

Reference: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Highlights: The clinical utility of compounded bioidentical hormone therapy (cBHT): A review of safety, effectiveness, and useRead the rest

Criminal charges against promoters of MMS as COVID-19 cure

Posted 14 July 2020

Mark Grenon, 62, and his sons, Jonathan Grenon, 34, Jordan Grenon, 26, and Joseph Grenon, 32, who allegedly marketed “Miracle Mineral Solution” (MMS), a toxic bleach, as a cure for COVID-19, have been charged with conspiracy to defraud the United States, conspiracy to violate the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and criminal contempt.

Reference: Father and sons charged in Miami federal court with selling toxic bleach as fake “miracle” cure for covid-19 and violating court orders. US Attorney’s Office Southern District of Florida news release. July 8, 2020

According to the criminal complaint affidavit, the Grenons allegedly:

  • directed their customers to ingest MMS, a solution that contains sodium chlorite and water, which causes the solution to become chlorine dioxide, a powerful bleach
  • claimed that MMS can treat, prevent, and cure COVID-19
  • marketed MMS as a miracle cure-all for dozens of other serious diseases
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