When Teen Boys Use Supplements

Posted 23 May 2020

New York Times By May 21, 2020

“I’ve started cutting,” my son, a college freshman, recently told me. He meant he was temporarily restricting calories to lose body fat as part of his new focus on bodybuilding. He planned to alternate cutting with “bulking,” or building up muscle mass, aided by over-the-counter supplements like protein powder and creatine.

Everything he was doing was legal, but was it safe? I also have a teenage daughter, and I was attuned to body-image-related issues affecting girls. But I realized the risks for teenage boys were equally worrisome and decided to check with several experts.

“Almost a third of boys are trying to gain weight or bulk up,” said Dr. Jason Nagata, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco.

Many turn to protein supplements in an attempt to

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It’s time to stop giving snake oil salesmen the benefit of the doubt.

Posted 20 May 2020

Centre for Enquiry April 13, 2020

[CamCheck does not focus on homeopathy. However, the points made in the article are appropriate for CamCheck by substituting ‘alternative medicine’ for homeopathy. Editor]

The makers of homeopathic medicine want it both ways.

  • They want their “drugs” to be treated like real medicine, to be able claim they can treat all kinds of ailments, and sell them right alongside evidence-based medicines on pharmacy shelves.
  • They also don’t want their products to be held to the same rigorous standards of safety and efficacy as real medicine. They don’t want to have to prove their stuff actually works, because, of course, they know it doesn’t.

Homeopathy is perhaps the most obviously phony form of alternative medicine, and we simply can’t assume that those who manufacture and market it are acting in good faith, any more than we assume positive intent from Read the rest

Spain links death to MuscleTech Hydroxycut Hardcore Next Gen

Spanish authorities have issued a warning about a food supplement from the United States after it was linked to a death in Spain.

HYDROXYCUT muscletech spain aesan IovateThe Spanish Agency for Food Safety and Nutrition (AESAN) reported the withdrawal of Hydroxycut Hardcore Next Gen for possible serious adverse reactions. The supplement is a MuscleTech brand, which is owned by Iovate Health Sciences International.

Iovate said it believes the product does not pose a risk to consumers as there have been no reports of adverse events relating to liver toxicity or death with almost half a million units sold.

Spanish authorities reported commercialization in the country is not allowed. However, the company said it confirmed with a local distributor that the product was notified and registered in Spain.

Death in Madrid
AESAN was informed by the Coordinated System for the Rapid Exchange of Information

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