More regulatory woes for Herbalife

Posted 20 April 2020

Global direct sales company Herbalife Nutrition Ltd. has recently extended its decades-long record of being the subject of regulatory actions.

  • Last year, it agreed to pay $20 million to settle Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) charges that it made false and misleading statements in numerous U.S. regulatory filings about the compensation model for its China-based service providers. SEC alleged that the actual model used is multilevel and based on downline purchases rather than hours worked. While direct selling is permitted in China, multilevel marketing is not. SEC found that Herbalife’s misleading statements deprived investors of the information they needed to fully evaluate the risk of investing in Herbalife stock.
    Reference: Herbalife to pay $20 million for misleading investors. US Securities and Exchange Commission press release. Sept 27, 2019

  • Two former company executives, Yanliang Li and Hongwei Yang, were charged in November on criminal and
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Study finds diverse diet as effective as sports supplements for female athletes

Posted 19 April 2020

by University of Montana

The edge. Every athlete, from the professional to the weekend warrior, strives to obtain that ever-elusive element that leads to victory—sometimes sparing no expense to get there.

A lighter bike, a better training regimen, the newest shoes.

A recently released study from the University of Montana, however, has discovered that common “edge,” sports nutrition products, are no more effective at promoting  in female athletes as regular, carbohydrate-rich, often less-expensive potato-based foods.

“Athletes are vulnerable to strategic marketing. We are easily swayed,” said UM Research Professor Brent Ruby, a veteran endurance  who knows all too well the allure of sports powders and gels.

As director of UM’s Montana Center for Work Physiology and Exercise Metabolism, Ruby and his team have done extensive work in the field of athletic performance and examining the role that post-exercise carbohydrate nutrition plays in the replenishing Read the rest

Regulation 11 should prevent promotion of quack Covid-19 treatments, but does it?

Posted 14 April 2020

By Tendai Mafuma• 31 March 2020

Daily Maverick

Tendai Mafuma describes what happened when SECTION27 tried to use new regulations to bring an end to the promotion of an unproven treatment for Covid-19 in South Africa and compares the current situation with the TAC’s successful court battle against Matthias Rath’s promotion of unproven Aids treatments.

The worldwide spread of the Covid-19 virus has led to widespread anxiety and panic. There are many factors causing this anxiety and panic with the absence of a vaccine or cure among the biggest factors.

South Africa’s public health system (that supports 84% of the population), is already buckling under the high prevalence of HIV/Aids and TB. Further, some life-saving medicines are often priced beyond the reach of many. It therefore comes as no surprise that everyone would be on edge and will desperately be on the lookout for affordable medicines Read the rest

FDA Warns Seller Marketing Dangerous Chlorine Dioxide Products that Claim to Treat or Prevent COVID-19

Posted 13 April 2020

Agency Continues Effort to Protect Public Health from Fraudulent and Harmful Products For Immediate Release: April 08, 2020

FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning letter to a seller that markets fraudulent and dangerous chlorine dioxide products known as “Miracle Mineral Solution” for prevention and treatment of “Novel Coronavirus Disease 2019” (COVID-19). The FDA has previously warned consumers not to purchase or drink chlorine dioxide products sold online as medical treatments, as the agency is not aware of any scientific evidence supporting their safety or effectiveness and they pose significant risks to patient health. The FDA is taking this action to protect Americans as part of its response to the global COVID-19 pandemic.

“Despite previous warnings, the FDA is concerned that we are still seeing chlorine dioxide products being sold with misleading claims that they are safe and effective for the treatment Read the rest

Covid-19: Can ‘boosting’ your immune system protect you?

Posted 11 April 2020

Forget kombucha and trendy vitamin supplements – they are nothing more than magic potions for the modern age.

“Spanish Influenza – what it is and how it should be treated,” read the reassuringly factual headline to an advert for Vick’s VapoRub back in 1918. The text beneath included nuggets of wisdom such as “stay quiet” and “take a laxative”. Oh, and to apply their ointment liberally, of course.

The 1918 flu pandemic was the most lethal in recorded history, infecting up to 500 million people (a quarter of the world’s population at the time) and killing tens of millions worldwide.

But with crisis comes opportunity, and the – sometimes literal – snake oil salesmen were out in force. Vick’s VapoRub had stiff competition from a panoply of crackpot remedies, including Miller’s Antiseptic Snake Oil, Dr

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How to avoid becoming a super spreader of fake news on social media – Top tips

Posted 02 April 2020

10 ways to spot online misinformation

By H. Colleen Sinclair* The Conversation

Propagandists are already working to sow disinformation and social discord in the run-up to the November elections.

Many of their efforts have focused on social media, where people’s limited attention spans push them to share items before even reading them – in part because people react emotionally, not logically, to information they come across. That’s especially true when the topic confirms what a person already believes.

It’s tempting to blame bots and trolls for these problems. But really it’s our own fault for sharing so widely.
Research has confirmed that lies spread faster than truth – mainly because lies are not bound to the same rules as truth.

As a psychological scientist who studies propaganda, here is what I tell my friends, students and colleagues about what to watch out for. Read the rest