Do vitamin drips really work? The evidence says ‘no’, so save your money and eat real food

Posted 21 January 2020

By Emily Burch Fearon

The Conversation

Do vitamin drips really work? The evidence says ‘no’, so save your money and eat real food

Want to boost your immune system, reduce your physical signs of ageing, or cleanse your blood to get rid of toxins? Intravenous (IV) vitamin therapy, or vitamin drips, promise to help. Some claim they can even benefit serious conditions like cancer, Parkinson’s disease, the eye condition macular degeneration, the pain of fibromyalgia and depression.

Celebrities have promoted them on social media. The demand has led to alternative therapy lounges popping up around the world, including in Australia. Patients can kick back in comfy leather chairs while they’re hooked up to IVs in the infusion lounge, watch Netflix and have some tea.

But do they work? Or are you just paying for really expensive urine? Let’s look at what the science says.

What is

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Do Skin Supplements Really Work? Here’s What Dermatologists Say.

Do Skin Supplements Really Work? Here’s What Dermatologists Say.

The market is saturated with beauty pills and powders that claim to boost your skin care routine. But do you need them?

There’s The Beauty Chef, where you can buy Inner Beauty Powder for $70. The Nue Co. sells a powder called Skin Food and Prebiotic that promises to boost skin’s collagen production for $55. HUM nutrition sells a variety of specialized supplements and Moon Juice sells powders and capsules and “dusts” that do everything from clear acne to promote glowing skin.

“We believe in feeding your body (and skin) for optimal health, and the science is there to support the benefits of plants, vitamins, minerals and micronutrients (both topically and internally),” Amanda Chantal Bacon, the founder of Moon Juice, told HuffPost. “Skin care starts on a cellular level and what you

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Evidence for using Melatonin for jet lag remains poor

Posted 21 January 2020

The Guardian Nicola Davis Tue 14 Jan 2020 07.00 GMT

Melatonin should not be offered by NHS to treat jet lag – review Independent review says evidence for using hormone for jet lag remains poor

The hormone melatonin should not be available on the NHS to help treat jet lag, a review of the evidence has concluded.

Melatonin is a hormone produced in the body during darkness that plays a role in the body clock and helps to regulate sleep cycles.

It is available on the NHS as a treatment for some sleep problems, including in older people and children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Whether it helps with jet lag is less clear . However in 2019 two melatonin products were licensed as a prescription medication for managing short-term jet lag by the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

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Most doctors agree: You don’t need vitamin and mineral supplements

Posted 15 January 2020

By Malibongwe Tyilo• 14 January 2020

Daily Maverick

The wellness industry is a multi-billion dollar behemoth promising optimal health through supplementation and other methods. Does science back their claims?

“The marketing and selling of multivitamins, and supplements to the general population is perhaps one of the most successful marketing ploys of pharmaceutical companies since we started making medicine. If you have a normally working gut and you do not have a severe malabsorption disease, or if you don’t have a documented vitamin deficiency, like vitamin D or vitamin B12, you do not need routine vitamin supplementation,” says Cape Town-based endocrinologist, Dr Jocelyn Hellig.

“Our stance on that as a medical fraternity is quite clear: there is no evidence for routine multivitamin supplementation in people who do not have documented vitamin deficiencies, or a malabsorption syndrome.”

Dr Jacques Badenhorst, a gastroenterologist based at the Netcare Read the rest

“Brain health” supplements panned

Posted 04 January 2020

The Global Council on Brain Health (GCBH) has issued a 31-page report that summarizes 15 consensus statements; expert recommendations for individuals, health care providers, people with mild cognitive impairment, dementia, or other brain disorders; practical tips for consumers; a discussion of specific supplements promoted for brain health; issues in safety, efficacy, marketing, and regulation of dietary supplements; and this conclusion:

There is no convincing evidence to recommend dietary supplements for brain health in healthy older adults. The consensus statements and recommendations above are based on the current state of science as of May 2019. Supplements have not been demonstrated to delay the onset of dementia, nor can they prevent, treat or reverse Alzheimer’s disease or other neurological diseases that cause dementia. For most people, the best way to get your nutrients for brain health is from a healthy diet. Unless your health care provider has identified Read the rest