Large-scale study finds most vitamin and mineral supplements have no positive effect

Posted 12 September 2018

Many scientists claim that, for most people, the only outcome from taking vitamin supplements is expensive urine. Now an international team of scientists has added weight to that belief in a large-scale meta-analysis that has concluded that most common vitamin supplements provide no health benefits, particularly in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, stroke and premature death.

Perhaps the most fundamental takeaway from this study is defiantly unsurprising but always worth restating. For those eating a normal, healthy diet, vitamin and mineral supplements are simply a waste of money. Extra boosts of vitamins we do not need will not confer enhanced protective benefits from disease or help us live longer.

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Banned sports stimulant, higenamine, found in supplements

Posted 10 September 2018

Higenamine is a stimulant that occurs naturally in a variety of traditional plant remedies. It has not been FDA-approved for any purpose, but is sold as an ingredient in supplement products.

In 2016, researchers made online purchases of 24 supplement products with higenamine as a labeled ingredient. Eleven of the products were marketed for weight loss, eleven were marketed as sports/energy supplements, and two were not labeled with a specific reason for use. Laboratory analyses revealed that the quantity of higenamine in the products ranged from trace amounts to 62 milligrams per serving with a margin of error of 6.0 milligrams.

Of the five products that listed a specific amount of higenamine on the label, none were accurate; the higenamine contents ranged from less than 0.01% to three times the quantity listed on the label. Clinical evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of higenamine is lacking. Read the rest

Boost Oxygen – Pseudoscience at its best

Posted 05 September 2018

Boost Oxygen is a new product launched which claims, among other:

Many BOOST Oxygen users experience increased concentration, as a result of improved Oxygen supply to the brain, and finds that breathing BOOST Oxygen helps them to relax and reduce their stress levels.  Using supplemental, portable Oxygen also supports and boosts the immune system.

More Oxygen, means more energy!  Stress – a common contributor to fatigue decreases the ability to absorb Oxygen into the blood, resulting in diminished oxygen to the tissues.  Breathing BOOST Oxygen will oxygenate tissues, restoring what has been depleted through exhaustion.

Oxygen deficiency symptoms include fatigue, stress, loss of energy, jet lag, and lack of focus and can be caused by physical activity, stress, poor air quality, travel, toxins and many other factors.

NO! NO! NO! This is unproven nonsense!

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Vitamin D: a pseudo-vitamin for a pseudo-disease

Posted 06 September 2018

This is an important and interesting perspective of Vitamin D supplementation. It is written by Prof Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology, King’s College London, and published in The Conversation.

He concludes:

About half the population take vitamins daily, despite zero benefits, with increasing evidence of harm. The worldwide trend of adding unregulated vitamins to processed food has now to be seriously questioned.

While vitamin D treatment still has a rare medical role in severe deficiency, or those bed bound, the rest of us should avoid being “treated” with this steroid for this pseudo-disease and focus on having a healthy lifestyle, sunshine and importantly save your money and energy on eating a rich diversity of real food.

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Herbalife sued by distributors

Posted 05 September 2018

Eight former Herbalife distributors have filed a class action complaint against Los Angeles-based Herbalife in the U.S. Southern District Court in Florida. The complaint states:

  • The company uses misrepresentation to sell access to emotionally manipulative events that have 200 to 20,000 attendees. 
  • The events use labels such as “Circle of Success,” as a guaranteed pathway to life-changing financial success with Herbalife’s multi-level marketing business opportunity. 
  • Each of the plaintiffs distributors has spent thousands of dollars attending events, but they received no benefits from doing so contrary to frequent claims by Herbalife that: “If you go to all the events, you qualify for everything – you will get rich.” 
  • The plaintiffs are seeking damages and injunctive relief against “the corrupt organization of individuals and entities who sell, operate and compel participation in the Circle of Success.”

An Associated Press report states that the case might eventually involve Read the rest

How Flat Tummy Co gamed Instagram to sell women the unattainable ideal

Posted 03 September 2018

‘Appetite suppressant’ lollipops and ‘detox’ teas have been promoted by the company’s hand-selected celebrities and Instagram models.

The product for sale – 35 calories worth of flavored cane sugar laced with an extract of saffron that supposedly curbs hunger – sparked immediate backlash for a company that had built its brand selling so-called “detox” teas. Good Place actor Jameela Jamil called out Kim Kardashian West for promoting the lollipops to her 116 million Instagram followers (“You terrible and toxic influence on young girls,” Jamil tweeted), and more than 100,000 people signed an online petition calling for the billboard’s removal.

“Dietary supplements sold for detox or weight loss are snake oil, plain and simple,” said Dr S Bryn Austin, a Harvard Medical School professor who specializes in eating disorder risks. “The liver and kidneys already do the the so-called detox and adding junk products into Read the rest

Alkaline diet: Separating pHacts from pHiction

Posted 3 September 2018

Dr Harriet Hall explains why the alkaline diet, and other claims of pH imbalance requiring intervention in individuals without chronic disease, is mostly nonsense. For example, does Vogel’s Multiforce Alkaline Powder claims have any merit, or are they simply marketing rubbish?

She writes:

The internet is a cornucopia of facts, some true and some “alternative” (in other words, lies). One topic that is particularly plagued by misinformation is pH. People are restricting their diet, buying alkaline water, testing their urine with pH test strips, and buying into bogus cancer cures, all on the basis of false pseudoscientific claims. Going back to basics will help us distinguish pHacts from pHiction.

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