5 supplements that claim to speed up weight loss – and what the science says

Posted 31 January 2018

From The Conversation

When you google “weight loss” the challenge to sort fact from fiction begins. These five supplements claim to speed up weight loss, but let’s see what the evidence says (for raspberry ketones, Matcha green tea powder, Garcinia cambogia supplements, caffeine supplements, and alkaline water)

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Review study: Can magnesium be absorbed through the skin?

Posted 30 January 2018

Miracle Magnesium, BetterYou, AquaMAG, THATMagnesium, and others make claims that magnesium can be absorbed through the skin (transdermal absorption), and that using magnesium this way will cure or treat you for a number of ailments.

We have consistently argued that very, very few substances can be absorbed through the skin, and without proof that magnesium can be, that one should consider all claims unsubstantiated, and in many cases are simply scams.

We asked BetterYou for proof that their claims could be substantiated. They sent me three articles, one of which one is published in a journal. The study, A Pilot Study to determine the impact of Transdermal Magnesium treatment on serum levels and whole body CaMg Ratios, is published in the European Journal for Nutraceutical Research. This appears to be a non-peer reviewed journal.

Searching for this article led me to a recent review Read the rest

‘Expensive’ placebos work better than ‘cheap’ ones, study finds

Posted 28 January 2018

How do you convert a simple saline solution into a useful treatment for people with Parkinson’s disease? Tell them it’s a drug that costs $100 per dose. And if you want to make it even more effective, tell them it costs $1,500 instead.

That’s what researchers from the University of Cincinnati discovered in an unusual clinical trial. Instead of testing a placebo against an actual drug, they pitted two placebos against each other. The only difference between the two sham treatments was their purported price.

Both of the placebos improved motor function compared with a base line test. But when patients got the $1,500-per-dose placebo, their improvement was 9% greater than when they got the $100-per-dose placebo, the researchers reported.

Continue reading at the LA Times

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What are antioxidants? And are they truly good for us?

Posted 21 January 2018

Antioxidants seem to be everywhere; in superfoods and skincare, even chocolate and red wine. Products that contain antioxidants are marketed as essential for good health, with promises to fight disease and reverse ageing.

But are they really as good for us as we’re led to believe?

But it’s a different story when it comes to antioxidant supplements. Research has found antioxidant supplements may cause more harm than good. A 2012 meta analysis of over 70 trials found antioxidant supplements are ineffective or even detrimental to health. 

Read at The Conversation

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CellMark: CellAssure, Cognify

Posted 18 January 2018

Dr Craige Golding (“The Anti-Aging Doctor!”) [1], Dr Grant Fourie [2] and others are promoting/selling the product CellAssure. Dr Golding’s website states for this product:

CellAssure’s ingredients have been clinically proven to:

• Demonstrate Anti-Cancer / Anti-tumor effects
• Provide needed nutrition for cancer patients without adding sugar
• Improve immune system response
• Maintain or increase appetite
• Increase LBM (lean body mass)
• Reduce stress / anxiety and lower cortisol levels
• Provide relief with nausea/vomiting and diarrhea
• Mitigate anemia and improve my liver function

The USA Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has acted against the manufacturer with a stipulated order for permanent injunction that prohibits the company from making any representation for any dietary supplement, food, or drug of treating, curing, mitigating, or preventing any disease; symptom of cancer; and side effect, condition, or ailment resulting from cancer treatment. Read the rest

Copper Heelers

Posted on 17 January 2018

Do Copper Heelers have any benefits?

Claims are made that using this product will alleviate a number of conditions: “Aching feet; Swollen legs; Back & neck problems; Shoulder problems; Wrinkles; Sagging skin; Poor circulation; Sexual dysfunction; Postural problems; Poor digestive function; Cardiovascular activity”.

A consumer complained to the UK ASA regarding the claims being made for this product.

The company was asked to substantiate the claims, but as they could not provide evidence to support these, agreed to change the advert.

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Naturopathy’s fiercest and most-knowledgeable critic is being sued by a naturopath

Posted 15 January 2018

From Science-Based Pharmacy

britt_pic_2_crop
Britt Marie Hermes is an ex-naturopath who has come clean about her time as a naturopath. This video explains her transition from naturopathy to science and evidence, and is well worth watching:

Britt is being sued by a naturopath who believes you can treat cancer with vitamins and baking soda. From Britt’s post:

Colleen Huber is a naturopathic cancer crusader and owner of Nature Works Best (NWB) naturopathic cancer clinic in Tempe, Arizona. She is not a medical doctor and, to the best of my knowledge, has no formal training in cancer research. Yet, Huber promotes herself as a cancer expert (herehere, and here) and is an outspoken critic of standard-of-care treatments for cancer. She wrote that “conventional treatments (chemo, radiation, etc.) sicken and weaken you and ultimately strengthen the disease.”

Huber treats cancer

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How to counter the circus of pseudoscience

Posted 11 January 2018

An excellent article by Lisa Pryor in the New York Times, points out how orthodox health professionals are taught to consider all facts, consider emerging evidence, and a change in factors. These result in constant doubt, readjustment of opinion based on new facts, and constant re-evaluation of your opinion. How this compares with alternative medicine practitioners who have no doubt, only certainly, in spite of little training or expertise.

Most doctors, especially the good ones, are acutely aware of the limits of their knowledge. I have learned from those much more experienced and qualified than me that humility is something to be cultivated over time, not lost.

Our field is built around trying to prove ourselves wrong. In hospitals we hold morbidity and mortality meetings trying to show where we have failed, what we need to change, how we can do better. Our hospital work Read the rest

Detoxing is the health ‘resolution’ you should avoid this year

Posted 08 January 2018

  • Detoxing by drinking  juices, going on cleanses, or using other formulas is unnecessary and may be dangerous.
  • Juicing fresh fruits and vegetables also strips them of some of their most beneficial ingredients.

Ever wished there was an easy, quick way to cleanse your body of all those 2017 toxins?

Turns out you’re already equipped with everything you need. They’re called your liver and kidneys.

Together, these two toxin-bashing organs act as a super-efficient system for filtering out the vast majority of the harmful substances we eat and drink.

In other words, you never need to detox. Not for New Year’s Day. Not after too much Thanksgiving turkey. Not even because you spent most of last year subsisting on greasy take-out from the C-rated “restaurant” next door.

Here’s how it works: While our kidneys filter our blood and remove any waste from our diet, our liver processes Read the rest