Herbex, MMS products detained in the USA

Posted 30 November 2017

According to this USA FDA Import Alert dated 21 November 2017, Herbex products, Faith Herbal Drops, MMS (Miracle Mineral Solution), XXXL Penis Enlarging Ointment, Aloe Bitter Arthro-Detox Tablets and others were detained and prevented from entering the USA.

The Alert states, among other:

*** Unapproved drugs present serious safety and effectiveness concerns“.
When evidence exists for the marketing or promotion of unapproved drugs to individuals residing in the United States, the products should be considered for detention without physical examination“. 

The Alert, Import Alert 66-41, can be viewed here

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One-third of UK dieters have used slimming pills bought online – report

Posted 30 November 2017

UK medicines regulator warns that many of the websites are unregulated and sell fake diet pills containing banned ingredients

One-third of people trying to lose weight have tried potentially dangerous slimming pills bought online, a government survey has found.

One in three participants had taken substances bought through websites, according to the poll of 1,805 people released by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and Slimming World.

The UK government medicines regulator said many of the websites are unregulated and the diet pills are often fake and contain ingredients that have been banned because of their harmful side-effects.

“Slimming tablets can seem like a quick-fix solution to weight problems, but some of them contain very dangerous ingredients,” said the senior MHRA policy manager Lynda Scammell. “It’s essential you know what you’re buying online and what the risks are. If you don’t, your weight could Read the rest

Is apple cider vinegar really a wonder food?

Posted 30 November 2017

By Rosemary Stanton

Published in The Conversation

Folk medicine has favoured apple cider vinegar for centuries and many claims are made for its supposed benefits.

Apple cider vinegar is made by chopping apples, covering them with water and leaving them at room temperature until the natural sugars ferment and form ethanol. Bacteria then convert this alcohol into acetic acid.

Strands of a “mother” will form in the cider. These are strained out of many products but left in others, and are often the target of health claims. The “mother” can also be used to start the production of the next batch of cider.

But will apple cider vinegar really help you lose weight, fight heart disease, control blood sugar and prevent cancer? And what about claims it is rich in enzymes and nutrients such as potassium?

Weight loss

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Defects found in 32% of multivitamins

Posted 29 November 2017

ConsumerLab.com, a USA company, regularly evaluates products being sold in the USA. Their mission: “to identify the best quality health and nutritional products through independent testing”.

In a report released today, they make these points:

If you’re not careful, you might not get what you’ve bargained for. We discovered problems in 46% of the multivitamins we selected for testing. More specifically, the test showed that…

  • 12 multivitamins contained much less (as low as 24%) or much more (as high as 157%) vitamin A, vitamin D, folate from folic acid, and/or calcium than listed on labels.
  • Many supplements exceeded upper tolerable intake levels — possibly doing more harm than good.
  • Gummy vitamins were especially problematic: 80% failed testing
  • Four multivitamins in tablet form failed to break apart within the required time. One needed 3 hours to fully disintegrate, 5 times the
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Biogen Peptan Collagen – Does it work?

Posted 28 November 2017

Biogen (a Dischem brand) has been advertising Biogen Peptan Collagen extensively on Cape Talk, among other. This product is essentially hydrolyzed collagen. 

Does taking collagen have any benefits?

Here is a good review published in Time magazine online, which gives the low down on this ‘supplement’.

“There are many preliminary trials showing potential benefits for everything from osteoarthritis to skin improvement,” Moyad says. Research has also linked collagen supplements to improved skin elasticity and skin moisture. But Moyad emphasizes that all of this research is preliminary. “The studies are weak in general,” he says—meaning small in scope, short in duration or not yet replicated by follow-up experiments.

Another recent review of the claims is dissected in an article in Business Insider: It’s supposed to help your skin, improve joint health, and assist with gastrointestinal distress.

“Verdict? The cheapest way to get the supposed benefits of Read the rest

Why do teenagers use supplements, and where do they get their advice?

Posted 27 November 2017

We have previously pointed out that USN, a company selling “sports supplements”, targets primary and high school children through it’s allied brand, SportsMax. The school selling the most sports supplements would get a free Bobby van Jaarsveld music concert. We made the point that this was unconscionable behaviour.

A study has been published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behaviour, addressing the issue of why teenagers use supplements.

A commentary in NutraIngredients.com, makes the following points:

“Many adolescents use dietary supplements in an attempt to increase sports performance or improve immunity, finds a new study that also suggests supplements are frequently used despite a lack of knowledge about possible harmful effects”

“According to the existing information, adolescents are the most susceptible and misinformed group of customers; thus this population is the target market for dietary supplements” (Lead researcher)

Continue reading at NutraIngredients.com

The Read the rest

Dutch authorities issue new safety warning on toxic bodybuilding supplements

Posted 24 November 2017

The increasing availability of 2,4 dinitrophenol (DNP) on the grey market in the Netherlands has prompted the Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA) to issue a warning against the substance.

“The packages were deliberately mislabelled as harmless food ingredients, such as chocolate powder, in an attempt to mislead customs. Research into the delivery addresses suggested that the DNP was intended for incorporation into food supplements with the final outlet being for use in gyms.”

Continue reading at NutraIngredients

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Health Canada toughens green tea extract warnings

Posted 17 November 2017

‘Cases of liver injury continue to be reported in Canada and worldwide,’ safety review says

By David Common, CBC News Posted: Nov 15, 2017 7:31 PM ET

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/health-canada-green-tea-extract-cbc-marketplace-1.4404054

Health Canada is ordering a more explicit warning on labels of green tea extract products over concerns about the risk of liver injury. The over-the-counter pills have become a popular option for those seeking to lose weight.

The change follows a federal safety review, prompted after Madeline Papineau, a 17-year-old in Cornwall, Ont., took the extract and quickly developed liver and kidney injury. Doctors were initially stumped by the damage, until the teen’s sister mentioned she’d been taking a diet supplement.

Health Canada says the risk of liver injury has been noted on the labels of products containing green tea extract since 2008. But on Wednesday the agency announced it was “clarifying warnings” by asking manufacturers to Read the rest

Salin Plus – natural salt therapy – UK ASA ruling

Posted 15 November 2017

An UK regional press ad for Salin Plus, a natural salt therapy, seen in the Down Recorder on 26 October 2016 and several other dates up to 17 February 2017, stated in the headline that “COPD, Asthma and Sinusitis sufferers can get relief with Natural Salt Therapy – No Masks or Tubes”. The ad stated that “according to pharmacists, this natural salt therapy service can improve the health of sufferers of debilitating issues including Asthma, Sinusitis, Rhinitis … Cystic Fibrosis, Allergies, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Snoring and Sleep Apnoea”. 

The UK ASA challenged whether the efficacy claims for the medical conditions listed in the ad were misleading and could be substantiated.

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Risky stimulants turn up – again – in weight loss and workout supplements

Posted 13 November 2017

This article, by Rebecca Robbins and published in StatNews, reports on “[T]he ingredients, apparently new, were popping up on the labels of dietary supplements marketed for weight loss and workouts. Sometimes the label said DMHA. Sometimes, Aconitum kusnezoffii. Or other, even harder-to-parse names”.

“Dr. Pieter Cohen, the Harvard internist and noted supplement detective, took the case. He and his collaborators purchased and analyzed six supplements marked as containing one of the mystery ingredients. They expected that, however they were listed, all the ingredients would turn out to be a stimulant known as octodrine, which the Food and Drug Administration approved decades ago, in inhaled form, as a treatment for bronchitis, laryngitis, and other conditions.”

Continue reading at StatNews

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