Systematic review blasts “adrenal fatigue” diagnosis

Posted 26 September 2017

Some healthcare providers are using the term “adrenal fatigue” to describe an alleged condition caused by chronic exposure to stressful situations. According to this theory, chronic stress can lead to “overuse” of the adrenal glands, eventually resulting in their functional failure. Last year, two Brazilian endocrinologists concluded that “adrenal fatigue”—also referred to as “adrenal burnout” and adrenal “exhaustion”—should be regarded as a myth. Their review analyzed the 58 most relevant studies identified in a systematic literature search.

References:
1. Cadegliani FA, Kater CE. Adrenal fatigue does not exist: a systematic review. BMC Endocrine Disorders 16:48(1), 2016
2. A Science-Based Medicine article describes the origin and danger of the “adrenal fatigue” concept. Gavura S. Adrenal fatigue: A fake disease (updated). Science-Based Medicine, June 29, 2017

Source:  Consumer Health Digest #17-37, September 124, 2017

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FDA warns against curcumin injections

Posted 19 September 2017

The FDA has received reports of patients who experienced hypersensitivity reactions immediately after received intravenous infusions of curcumin (a component of the spice turmeric) compounded with polyethylene glycol 40 castor oil. The PEG 40 castor oil was a component of a curcumin emulsion product compounded by a pharmacy, ImprimisRx, located in Irvine, California. One patient was being treated by a naturopath for eczema; the other was being treated for thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) at a “holistic health center.”

Hypersensitivity reactions to other intravenous products containing polyethylene glycol castor oil have been reported and are the subject of warnings for a number of FDA-approved drugs. On June 23, ImprimisRx recalled all unexpired products containing the ungraded PEG 40 castor oil. The FDA is concerned about the risks associated with compounded drugs, particularly those that use non-pharmaceutical grade components and ingredients that lack a USP monograph. The problems Read the rest

Man gets cyanide poisoning from taking apricot kernel extract to prevent cancer

Posted 11 September 2017

DIY medicine can have serious consequences.

Michelle Starr 12 SEP 2017

Read at ScienceAlert

A seemingly healthy 67-year old Australian man developed cyanide poisoning after ingesting apricot kernel extract.

The man in this case was making his own extract, and consuming two teaspoons of it daily, in addition to taking a commercial fruit kernel supplement called Novodalin. He had had prostate cancer, which had gone into remission. 

“The gentleman involved has a scientific background and he had read that apricot kernel extract would prevent his cancer from recurring,” his anaesthetist, Alex Konstantatos, told The Huffington Post.

Apricot kernels have been widely publicised as a miracle cancer cure on and off since the 1950s. They contain a compound called amygdalin, which can be partially synthesised into laetrile.

When we ingest amygdalin or laetrile, our digestive bacteria and food enzymes break them down into cyanide, Read the rest

Supplements seized: UK and Dutch authorities capture DNP and steroid supplements

Posted 10 September 2016

Food safety agencies in the UK have seized large quantities of DNP following a multi-agency effort, while Dutch authorities captured anabolic-androgenic steroids intended for use in sports nutrition supplements.

Despite being illegal for human consumption, the 2,4 dinitrophenol (DNP), remains on sale online and in some gyms. Commonly used as a diet aid, DNP has severe side effects and has been responsible for eight deaths in the UK since 2015.

Due to it’s alleged fat burning properties, however, the drug is still commonly sold online and at gyms, in the forms of capsules or powder.

“DNP can and does kill. We are relentless in pursuing those seeking to profit from the illegal sale of this toxic substances for human consumption,” said Heather Hancock, FSA chairman.

Read the full article at NutraIngredients.com

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ZYTO device flunks tests

Posted 04 September 2017

ZYTO Corporation, of Orem, Utah, sells several devices that it claims are useful for determining what dietary supplements, herbs, or homeopathic products might be useful. The devices use a hand cradle that relays signals to and from a computer that runs ZYTO’s proprietary software. ZYTO claims that the software “sends stimuli to the body using digital signatures that represent actual things” and interprets fluctuations in skin resistance that indicate “the body’s degree of preference for the items being assessed.”
Reference: Barrett S. ZYTO scanning: Another test to avoid. Device Watch, Aug 22, 2017

Last year, Dr. Stephen Barrett was able to obtain a working ZYTO device and tested himself 43 times in ten days. Sixteen of the tests were “basic” scans that purported to detect problems with 20 body organs. These scans reported an average of 11 problematic organs, but the organs specified and the Read the rest