Products Claiming to “Cure” Cancer Are a Cruel Deception

Posted 27 April 2017

Products Claiming to “Cure” Cancer Are a Cruel Deception

Food and Drug Administration

Beware of products claiming to cure cancer on websites or social media platforms, such as Facebook and Instagram. According to Nicole Kornspan, M.P.H., a consumer safety officer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), they’re rampant these days.

“Anyone who suffers from cancer, or knows someone who does, understands the fear and desperation that can set in,” says Kornspan. “There can be a great temptation to jump at anything that appears to offer a chance for a cure.”

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FDA cracks down on companies pushing fraudulent cancer claims

Posted 26 April 2017

FDA cracks down on companies pushing fraudulent cancer claims

By Laurie McGinley April 25 at 4:55 PM

Washington Post

The Food and Drug Administration ordered 14 companies to stop making bogus claims about cancer cures – including asparagus extract, exotic teas and topical creams for pets – or face possible product seizures and criminal prosecution.

The letters covered more than five-dozen unapproved products that the companies touted as preventing, treating or curing cancer, a violation of federal law, the agency said. The items included pills, ointments, oils, drops, teas and diagnostic devices.

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FDA – Illegally Sold Cancer Treatments

Posted 26 April 2017

The FDA has issued 14 warning letters and four online advisory letters to companies illegally selling more than 65 products that claim to prevent, diagnose, treat, mitigate or cure cancer. The products are marketed and sold without FDA approval, most commonly on websites or social media platforms. They have not been reviewed by FDA for safety and efficacy, and can be dangerous to both people and pets.

Continue reading at https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ProtectYourself/HealthFraud/ucm533465.htm

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Female libido booster Addyi shows up in supplements

Posted 26 April 2017

Following in the footsteps of Viagra, female libido booster Addyi shows up in supplements

By Megan Thielking @meggophone April 19, 2017

Following in the footsteps of Viagra, female libido booster Addyi shows up in supplements

Following in the footsteps of its predecessor Viagra, the female libido drug Addyi has snuck into over-the-counter supplements that tout their ability to “naturally” enhance sexual desire.

The Food and Drug Administration announced a recall Wednesday of two supplements marketed to boost women’s sex drive. The supplements Zrect and LabidaMAX – both manufactured by Organic Herbal Supply – actually contained flibanserin, a medication approved by the FDA in late 2015 to treat hypoactive sexual desire disorder in women. It’s the first time federal officials have recalled a product contaminated with the drug.

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Complementary Medicines – 2 more guidelines published for comment

Posted 21 April 2017

Two more complementary medicines/health supplements guidelines have been published for comment by the MCC:

The deadline for comment is 31 May 2017.

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Coty Rimmel mascara – exaggerated effects for the product?

Posted 20 April 2017

A TV ad in the UK for a Rimmel mascara, stated, “Rimmel introduces Cara Delevingne for new Scandaleyes Reloaded mascara. Dangerously bold lashes. New max-density brush for clump free lashes. Extreme volume … Extreme wear.” The ad also included several images of the product being applied to eye lashes and a model wearing the mascara.

A complainant challenged whether the ad misleadingly exaggerated the likely effects of the product.

The UK ASA concluded that “[B]ecause the ad conveyed a volumising, lengthening and thickening effect of the product we considered the use of lash inserts and the post-production technique were likely to exaggerate the effect beyond what could be achieved by the product among consumers.”

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Teens Receiving Inaccurate Information on Supplements

Posted 19 April 2017

A new study shows that teenage boys are frequently encouraged to use creatine and testosterone boosters by sales attendants at health food stores, despite American Academy of Pediatrics’ warnings.

Researchers pretending to be 15-year-old high school athletes asked sales attendants at 244 health food stores across the United States for advice on how to increase muscle strength. Creatine was recommended by 67.2% of the stores, 38.5% of which provided the recommendation without being asked specifically, while 28.7% recommended creatine when asked directly if it was not initially suggested. Furthermore, 74.2% of sales attendants stated that a 15-year-old could purchase creatine without a parent. Testosterone boosters were recommended by 9.8% of sales attendants. Study authors suggested that pediatricians should be educating teenage patients, particularly athletes, about these products and discourage their use.

References:

Herriman M, Fletcher L, Tchaconas A, et al. Dietary Supplements and Young Teens: Read the rest

Natural Healing Solutions – UK ASA ruling

Posted 19 April 2017

The website www.health-disk.com, which linked through to an online shop, www.naturalhealingsolutions.co.uk, seen on 12 January 2017 included several products. One product was entitled “Bespoke e-Lybra Treatment” and the product information stated “This is a bespoke homeopathic-like bioresonance formulation based on the BioData you provide that is used to match remedy signatures on a biofeedback basis … A distance treatment is given by the process of running the programme … You will need to provide the following BioData … for whatever individual requires a bioresonance formulation, eg. [sic] horse, dog, cat, person etc … A session can be directed towards helping support recovery from certain symptoms or can be used as a general support for maintenance purposes … The resultant remedy can be sent out as a bottle of programmed soft tablets or on a programmed e-Pendent or e-Pebble … The formulation should be stable in … Read the rest

Belle Gibson mimicked countless fake healers

Posted 05 April 2017

This article published in the Guardian, reports on Belle Gibson, a young Australian who claimed to have been cured of cancer following a ‘natural’ path, and in the process building a thriving career based on what in fact turned out to be a lie. She never had cancer.

[quote] Gibson’s public excoriation did nothing to temper her enthusiasm for peddling cures. No reflection on the damage she wreaked on vulnerable people. No self-imposed exile from being a wellness guru to her admiring followers. No, she simply moved on to Facebook under a pseudonym and continued to champion worm-releasing enemas, iris-altering tinctures, and tonsil-shrinking teas. While many people shake their head at this nonsense, she is not short of admirers who hold her in even higher estimation as a rebuke to the naysayers.[/quote]

There are lessons to be learnt here – South Africans are constantly being … Read the rest