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Supreme Slim

A new weight-loss product has been released onto the South African market: Supreme Slim.

Comment: 

  1. This product claims to result in weight loss, but we are unaware of any studies that show that this product is effective.
  2. This product uses ingredients common to other weight loss products – ingredients have not been shown to be effective in weight loss.
  3. The ingredients in this product have been used in various combinations in other failed weight-loss products: why would they suddenly be working effectively in this product?
  4. When consumers health, money and safety is concerned, we can only argue for proof for the product, for without proof, we have to argue that it is no more than a scam.

It is not a surprise that the ingredients were mixed together in the laboratory, and, without testing on animals or humans, released for human consumption with the claim that the product will result in weight loss. It states: "At last a product without any nasty surprises. The only surprise you will get is getting on to the scale after a month and realise that you have lost a lot of that unwanted fat!"

Well the surprise is that the manufactures are gambling on your faith, gambling with your health and safety, and have not tested this product in a single study. Of course, as pointed out elsewhere, there will always be at least one individual that will lose weight even with a sea sand capsule taken once a day, and certainly not for 100% of users – taking this product is like playing the lottery except will cost you R500 per month!

Let's examine the individual ingredients and their side effects. (Note – if the individual ingredients dose are very low, no effect can be expected and side effects are low, but if the dose is high, then one can expect side effects.)

Let us look at the evidence as summarised in Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (NMCD) "Scientific Gold Standard for Evidence-Based, Clinical Information on Natural Medicines "

Citrus Aurantium 30%

Effectiveness:
"INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE:
Obesity.  . . .  preliminary clinical research suggests that a . . . product containing bitter orange 150 mg, providing 9 mg synephrine, plus caffeine and several other ingredients taken twice daily does not significantly reduce weight"

Safety:
"But there is concern that bitter orange can cause potentially severe adverse effects in some patients due to its stimulant effects. There are case reports of ischemic stroke, and cardiotoxicity including tachyarrhythmia, cardiac arrest, syncope, angina, myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmia, and death in otherwise healthy patients who have taken bitter orange extract alone or in combination with other stimulants such as caffeine"

Gingko Biloba 24%

Effectiveness: Never tested for weight-loss effect. 

Safety:
"LIKELY SAFE …when used orally and appropriately. "

Ginseng Extract 10:1

Effectiveness: Never tested for weight-loss

Safety:
"POSSIBLY SAFE …when used orally and appropriately, short-term."

Guarana Extract 22%

Effectiveness:
"INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE :
Obesity. Guarana taken orally might cause weight loss when used in combination with mate and damiana. There is also preliminary evidence that a specific combination product containing guarana, ephedra [a banned substance], and 17 other vitamins, minerals, and supplements might help reduce weight . . .  when used with a low-fat diet and exercise"
 

Safety:
"POSSIBLY UNSAFE …when used orally long-term in high doses. Guarana contains a significant amount of caffeine. Chronic use, especially in large amounts, can produce tolerance, habituation, psychological dependence, and other significant adverse effects. Doses greater than 250-300 mg per day have been associated with significant adverse effects such as tachyarrhythmias and sleep disturbances"

Kola Nuts (20% caffeine)

Effectiveness:
"INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE
Obesity. Preliminary, manufacturer-sponsored clinical research suggests that cola nut in combination with ephedra [banned] and willow bark might cause modest weight loss in overweight and obese people. . . . This combination might not be appropriate for weight loss due to safety concerns related to ephedra. Ephedra is banned in the US due to severe adverse effects"
 

Safety:
"LIKELY UNSAFE …when used orally in very high doses. Cola nut contains caffeine. The fatal acute oral dose of caffeine is estimated to be 10-14 grams (150-200 mg per kilogram). Serious toxicity can occur at lower doses depending on variables in caffeine sensitivity such as smoking, age, prior caffeine use, etc"

L-Tyrosine

Effectiveness: Not tested for weight loss.

Safety:
"POSSIBLY SAFE …when used orally and appropriately, short-term."

Magnesium Stearate Excipient? (An excipient is an inactive substance used as a carrier for the active ingredients of a medication.)
Phosphatidyl Serine 20% Excipient?
Pyridoxine Vitamin B6 – no effect on weight loss
Riboflavin Vitamin B2 – no effect on weight loss
Sodium Pyruvate

Effectiveness:
"INSUFFICIENT RELIABLE EVIDENCE to RATE
Weight loss. Preliminary clinical research suggest taking pyruvate orally in place of a portion of dietary carbohydrates and in combination with a low calorie diet seems to help increase weight loss and to decrease body fat. Other research suggests no effect on body weight or body composition. More evidence is needed to rate pyruvate for these uses."

Safety:
"POSSIBLY SAFE …when used orally and appropriately, short-term."

Sodium Starch Glycolate Excipient?
St Johns Wort herb

Effectiveness: Not tested for weight loss.
"LIKELY EFFECTIVE: Depression."

Safety:
"LIKELY SAFE …when used orally and appropriately."

Taurine

Effectiveness: Not tested for weight loss.

Safety:
"POSSIBLY SAFE …when used orally and appropriately. "

Caffeine Anhydrous

Effectiveness:
 "POSSIBLY EFFECTIVE:
Weight loss. Taking caffeine orally in combination with ephedrine [banned] seems to help reduce weight, short-term. Caffeine 192 mg in combination with ephedra 90 mg per day for 6 months seems to cause a modest weight reduction  . . . . This combination, along with limiting fat intake to 30 percent of calories and moderate exercise, also seems to reduce body fat . .  . "
[only "possibly effective" when used in combination with a banned substance!]

Safety:
"POSSIBLY UNSAFE …when used orally, long term or in high doses. Chronic use, especially in large amounts, can produce tolerance, habituation, psychological dependence, and other significant adverse effects. Doses greater than 250-300 mg per day have been associated with significant adverse effects such as tachyarrhythmias and sleep disturbances."

 

 Note: There are three sources of caffeine in this product: Caffeine anhydrous, guarana and kola nuts.

So it is very clear: there is NO good evidence that any of these ingredients individually can result in weight loss, so how does one then claim (without testing) that together they do!

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